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Once there was a little mermaid who fell in love with a human boy . . . The story may be familiar, but Lisbeth Zwerger's art makes this fairytale seem brand-new. This Jubilee edition, celebrating 200 years of Hans Christian Andersen, is superbly illustrated in Zwerger's signature style. Known for her popular and award-winning editions of classics such as The Wizard of Oz a Once there was a little mermaid who fell in love with a human boy . . . The story may be familiar, but Lisbeth Zwerger's art makes this fairytale seem brand-new. This Jubilee edition, celebrating 200 years of Hans Christian Andersen, is superbly illustrated in Zwerger's signature style. Known for her popular and award-winning editions of classics such as The Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, Zwerger is herself the recipient of the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for lasting contributions to children's literature. The Little Mermaid is sure to win her new fans, and to delight her old ones. The text is an all-new translation by Anthea Bell, and includes many lovely and poignant details that may be new to even those who think they know the little mermaid's story well.


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Once there was a little mermaid who fell in love with a human boy . . . The story may be familiar, but Lisbeth Zwerger's art makes this fairytale seem brand-new. This Jubilee edition, celebrating 200 years of Hans Christian Andersen, is superbly illustrated in Zwerger's signature style. Known for her popular and award-winning editions of classics such as The Wizard of Oz a Once there was a little mermaid who fell in love with a human boy . . . The story may be familiar, but Lisbeth Zwerger's art makes this fairytale seem brand-new. This Jubilee edition, celebrating 200 years of Hans Christian Andersen, is superbly illustrated in Zwerger's signature style. Known for her popular and award-winning editions of classics such as The Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonderland, Zwerger is herself the recipient of the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for lasting contributions to children's literature. The Little Mermaid is sure to win her new fans, and to delight her old ones. The text is an all-new translation by Anthea Bell, and includes many lovely and poignant details that may be new to even those who think they know the little mermaid's story well.

30 review for The Little Mermaid

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bionic Jean

    The Little Mermaid, or "Den lille havfrue" is one of the most famous fairy tales by the Danish author, Hans Christian Andersen. It is a tale which has captured the imagination, sparking off numerous adaptations, and a ballet version of it inspired a statue which sits on a rock in the Copenhagan harbour in Langelinie. Even though the statue is quite small, it has itself become a Copenhagen icon and a major tourist attraction. The tale was first published in 1837, along with "The Emperor's New Clot The Little Mermaid, or "Den lille havfrue" is one of the most famous fairy tales by the Danish author, Hans Christian Andersen. It is a tale which has captured the imagination, sparking off numerous adaptations, and a ballet version of it inspired a statue which sits on a rock in the Copenhagan harbour in Langelinie. Even though the statue is quite small, it has itself become a Copenhagen icon and a major tourist attraction. The tale was first published in 1837, along with "The Emperor's New Clothes". Hans Christian Andersen generally published his fairy tales, or retellings of fairy tales, in small books containing only a small number. This particular pairing was a good one. This sad tale about yearning love and sacrifice, proves a perfect counterweight to the humour of "The Emperor's New Clothes". At the start, the story focuses on a very young mermaid, who lives in an underwater kingdom with her family. Her father is the mer-King, and she has five older sisters, each of whom had been born one year apart. Their grandmother helps to raise them all. When each mermaid becomes fifteen, she is allowed to swim to the surface of the sea for the first time, to glimpse the world above, and observe all that happens with the strange land-people. Each of the sisters in turn looks forward to reaching the memorable date. Then when she is old enough, each of them is keen to visit the upper world and to reports back on what she saw and did. The beautiful youngest daughter, quietly and eagerly, awaits her turn. And each time, as another sister returns, the Little Mermaid listens with longing to all they tell of the strange world above. (view spoiler)[ At last the little mermaid's turn arrives. She swims up to the surface, and sees a human prince on a ship, celebrating his birthday. Without his knowing, the little mermaid falls in love with this handsome prince with his jet-black eyes, from a distance. Like all mer-people, she is excited to see a violent storm approaching. But then she realises that because humans are different from mer-people, the handsome prince is actually in great danger. The little mermaid valiantly rescues him from drowning, and carries him to the safety of land, near a white building. Then she waits in hiding, to make sure he is found. Eventually a group of girls come out from the building and discover him, so the little mermaid returns to her home under the sea. But as time passes, the little mermaid sadly realises that the prince does not even know it was she who had saved his life. She is so quiet and thoughtful that her sisters begin to worry. When she tells them, one of her sisters helps her to find the kingdom where the handsome prince came from, so that she can watch him as he lives his day to day life in the palace. However, it does not really help. The little mermaid becomes even more melancholy after this, and asks her grandmother what would happen to humans if they did not drown. Would they live forever? Her grandmother explains that humans have only a short lifespan whereas mer-people live for 300 years. But when mermaids die, they turn to sea foam and cease to exist, whereas humans have an immortal soul, which rises up into the sky and lives on in heaven. According to her grandmother, the only way a mermaid can acquire an immortal soul, is if a human man falls in love with her and marries her. This makes the little mermaid determined to make the prince fall in love with her, but she needs help, so she sneaks away from a party and secretly visits the Sea Witch. She is very frightened, finding her way to the entrance through grasping polyps, and eels. One eel even has a dead mermaid in its clutches. Clearly the Sea Witch lives in a dangerous part of the ocean, "She had built her house from the bones of shipwrecked men, and here she sat, letting a toad feed out of her mouth, just as some people do with a pet canary ... She pressed [the vile slimy eels] close to her vast spongy chest." As with all stories of this kind, the hideous Sea Witch agrees that she can help, but demands a terrible price for her special potion. The little mermaid must give up her best talent - her beautiful singing voice. In return, the Sea Witch will give her the potion. The Sea Witch tells the little mermaid that drinking the potion will feel agonising, as if a sword is being passed through her body. But when the little mermaid recovers, she will still be beautiful and have two "pretty legs". She will also be able to dance more gracefully than any human has ever danced before. But every step she takes will feel as if she is walking on sharp knives. The conditions pile on. The Sea Witch warns that once the little mermaid becomes human, she will never be able to return to the sea. If the prince does not fall in love with her, and marries someone else instead, then the little mermaid will die the next day. At dawn on the first day after he does so, the little mermaid will die of a broken heart and dissolve into sea foam upon the waves. And, just to finally seal the bargain, the witch will cut out the little mermaid's tongue as payment. The little mermaid remains undeterred by all these terrible conditions. After she agrees to the arrangement, the little mermaid swims to the shore, near the prince's palace, and drinks the potion, fainting with the agonising pain. But when she comes to, she sees that she now has a pair of (what to her, look) very strange human legs, instead of her beautiful tail. The handsome prince discovers her, and says that she reminds him of the girl who (he assumes) had saved him - the girl from the white building who happened to be there when he woke up. Of course, the little mermaid has no voice, so cannot tell him the truth. Although the prince admires the little mermaid enormously and is fascinated by her beauty and grace, he does not fall in love with her. He likes to see her dance, and she dances for him even though her feet bleed and she suffers excruciating pain with every step. The prince is kind to the little mermaid, and has a boy's velvet suit made for her, so that he can take her everywhere with him on horseback. Soon, the prince's parents decide it is time for their son to marry, and encourage him to marry a princess from a neighbouring kingdom. The prince confides in the little mermaid that he is sure he will do no such thing. But when the prince meets the princess, in true fairytale fashion, she turns out to be the girl from the white building who found him on the beach - and hence the girl he believes saved his life. The prince unknowingly shares his joy in this with the heartbroken little mermaid, who still cannot convey the true story. He declares his love for the princess, and the royal wedding is announced at once. The little mermaid has no choice but to help with all the preparations, and even carry the bride's train up the aisle. After the wedding, the prince and princess celebrate on a wedding ship, and the little mermaid realises that she has lost everything, and will now die very soon, in a matter of hours. But unbeknownst to her, her sisters have a plan. They swim up to her, looking very different. The sisters have made a bargain with the Sea Witch. She demanded that they cut off all their long, beautiful hair in exchange for a special knife. The Sea Witch has promised that if the little mermaid plunges this knife into the prince's chest and kills him, then when his blood drips on her feet, her legs will turn back into a tail. If the little mermaid does this, and also lets the prince die, she will become a mermaid once more, all her suffering will end, and she will live out her full life in the ocean with her family as before. The little mermaid watches the prince as he sleeps, but the only word on his lips is the name of his bride. She cannot bear to kill him, and just as dawn breaks, the little mermaid tosses the knife into the sea. She follows it by throwing herself in after it, since she fully expects to turn into sea foam. However, she does not. She feels the warm sun and realises that she still exists, but as an earthbound spirit, a spirit of the air, instead. There are many other daughters of the air around too. They explain to the little mermaid that because she tried with all her heart to obtain an immortal soul, and because of her supreme selflessness and mercy in not killing the prince, she has become one of them instead of turning into sea foam. Additionally she will be given the chance to earn her own soul by doing good deeds for humans for 300 years. One day she will have earned her immortal soul and will rise up into heaven. And each time she visits the house of a good child, as a spirit of the air that time will be lessened. (hide spoiler)] So does this story have a happy ending? It certainly is a heart-breaking love story, and one which fulfils many satisfying features of fairy tales. The young mermaid is willing to give up her life in the sea - in fact her entire identity as a mermaid - in order to gain a human soul. The working title of the story was "Daughters of the Air". But the final message is unclear, and has been heavily criticised over the years. The little mermaid's eventual earning of an immortal soul depends on the behaviour of human children - whether they are good or bad. If they are good then that takes a year off her 300 years, but bad behaviour makes the spirits of the air weep, and a day is added for every tear they shed. This was a later revision by Hans Christian Andersen, as shown below, and it seems even more punitive that the first! P.L. Travers, in addition to writing the series about "Mary Poppins", was a noted expert on folklore. She wrote, "This final message is more frightening than any other presented in the tale. The story descends into the Victorian moral tales written for children to scare them ... a year taken off when a child behaves and a tear shed and a day added whenever a child is naughty? Andersen, this is blackmail. And the children know it and say nothing. There's magnanimity for you." It baffles me. Is it a tragic ending? Is it a happy one? I could accept either, although the events in this tale heavily point towards one rather than the other. What I dislike is the inconclusiveness, and indecision. Hans Christian Andersen's original manuscript shows that he has not deliberately written an ambiguous ending, but had a change of heart - and possibly not a final one. So four stars. The descriptive passages early in this longish tale are simply beautiful and the entire piece is very affecting.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ahmed Ejaz

    By now, I should be saying that I am used to reading Anderson's bitter-sweet tales. After all, I have read many of them. BUT HELL NO! I can't say it. The only reason I still read his tales is because his writing style is so vivid and beautiful. I am kind of addicted to his writing in such a way that I must have a dose of it once in a while. This tale is my favourite as far as description of scenes are concerned. He has a way with imagining awesome scenes. But for plot, I think almost every ta By now, I should be saying that I am used to reading Anderson's bitter-sweet tales. After all, I have read many of them. BUT HELL NO! I can't say it. The only reason I still read his tales is because his writing style is so vivid and beautiful. I am kind of addicted to his writing in such a way that I must have a dose of it once in a while. This tale is my favourite as far as description of scenes are concerned. He has a way with imagining awesome scenes. But for plot, I think almost every tale of his revolves around bitter-ending love story. This tale too has it. I felt nothing new. One thing I can say here is that for the first time, even though I was sad, I didn't mind this bitter-ending. 7 January, 2018

  3. 5 out of 5

    Dominique

    Hmm... I think it´s wrong to compare it with the Disney version of The Little Mermaid, although I didn´t expected Andersen´s version was so... what shall I call it... f*cked up... The point of view of the Little Mermaid herself was wonderful, she was sweet and good-hearted. But the prince, omg! Why would you love such a person?! I mean: The prince said she should remain with him always, and she received permission to sleep at his door, on a velvet cushion. What is she?! A dog?! And the ending Hmm... I think it´s wrong to compare it with the Disney version of The Little Mermaid, although I didn´t expected Andersen´s version was so... what shall I call it... f*cked up... The point of view of the Little Mermaid herself was wonderful, she was sweet and good-hearted. But the prince, omg! Why would you love such a person?! I mean: The prince said she should remain with him always, and she received permission to sleep at his door, on a velvet cushion. What is she?! A dog?! And the ending was an anticlimax, but okay, I suppose that´s because I saw the Disney movie.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ivana - Diary of Difference

    Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest I grew up with Disney movies and my favourite one was the one with the mermaid that has long red hair, and I loved her love story, and also enjoyed watching the rest of the movie series that followed years later. And while loving Ariel for so long, I have never actually read the original story. So a few weeks ago, I decided to cherish it properly, as a true childhood love deserves to be cherished. And I was left with my jaw dropped and my mouth Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest I grew up with Disney movies and my favourite one was the one with the mermaid that has long red hair, and I loved her love story, and also enjoyed watching the rest of the movie series that followed years later. And while loving Ariel for so long, I have never actually read the original story. So a few weeks ago, I decided to cherish it properly, as a true childhood love deserves to be cherished. And I was left with my jaw dropped and my mouth open, unable to sleep. I can’t say this book crushed my childhood love, but it definitely shook me quite hard. If you are expecting to read about the little mermaid, and her adventures in the water, and how she would give anything to see how people live on Earth, and fall in love with a prince – you will get all that. In fact – the book description is far better compared to the movie. Incomparable, actually. The book glows with bright colourful descriptions of the world under the sea, and it is so vividly enchantingly explained. But if you are expecting to read about the adorable love story of Ariel and the prince, and their happily ever after – that is not happening. Because things go wrong. Horribly wrong. With a crushing, terrible end, that will torture you in your dreams. It wasn’t my intention to make this review so dark. The story is still wonderful, and full of life. However, there is no happy ending, and that, for me, was crucial to not enjoy it. And I am not usually upset with unhappy endings. It happens so often. But this one was so brutal and cruel, that it felt so disturbing. Maybe, because it is my favorite childhood movie. Maybe, because I knew this to be a happy story. Maybe, because I didn’t expect this at all. Hans Christian Andersen is an amazing writer. I have read many of his stories, and enjoyed them greatly. I honestly don’t know what was going on in his life when he was writing this, but wow. Just wow. Blog | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Pinterest

  5. 4 out of 5

    Olivia-Savannah Roach

    I am going to have to stop telling people The Little Mermaid is my favourite fairytale and start telling them it's one of my favourite stories. I really do like the tale. I like the danger to it, the sadness, the abandonment of family and life, the loss, the pain and the darkness. So much longing in this story, longing for what you don't have, and then what you abandoned to get what you do have... it's a cycle. I find it really meaningful and raw and I love when magical tales can make you feel t I am going to have to stop telling people The Little Mermaid is my favourite fairytale and start telling them it's one of my favourite stories. I really do like the tale. I like the danger to it, the sadness, the abandonment of family and life, the loss, the pain and the darkness. So much longing in this story, longing for what you don't have, and then what you abandoned to get what you do have... it's a cycle. I find it really meaningful and raw and I love when magical tales can make you feel that way. But at the same time, the actual fairytale itself is a bit... boring. It takes a long time to get to the point, and then the ending comes pretty quickly. And then there is a quick hash at tidying up everything in the last page so it's more of a bittersweet ending than anything else. I kind of wish that it went all the way with the ending pathway it seemed to be on. I also feel like the pacing was off. And the story was just a bit boring throughout... the way it was told was not as captivating as it could've been. It was atmospheric, but it wasn't absorbing like I wanted it to be. Hmm, mixed feelings.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jonnie

    Hah. This is going to be like the ragequit of book reviews. *calm deep breaths* *inhale* *exhale* *googling pictures of fluffy kittens* WHAT THE FUCK HANS? WHAT THE FUCK! No no no no no. NO. I need to bleach this version from my SOUL. Hans, I'M TAWKING TO YOU. Rise up out of your 140 year old grave right now AND FIX THIS SHIT. I'm hunting down the original, and setting it on fire. Or at the very least writing Sebastian into your story. YOU CAN'T HAVE THE LITTLE MERMAID WITHOUT THE SASSY JAMAICAN CR Hah. This is going to be like the ragequit of book reviews. *calm deep breaths* *inhale* *exhale* *googling pictures of fluffy kittens* WHAT THE FUCK HANS? WHAT THE FUCK! No no no no no. NO. I need to bleach this version from my SOUL. Hans, I'M TAWKING TO YOU. Rise up out of your 140 year old grave right now AND FIX THIS SHIT. I'm hunting down the original, and setting it on fire. Or at the very least writing Sebastian into your story. YOU CAN'T HAVE THE LITTLE MERMAID WITHOUT THE SASSY JAMAICAN CRAB OK. I can't even fathom how this is classed as a fairy tale. This wasn't meant for children, right? I mean, this is downright DEPRESSING. I mean, I need some chocolately snacks and counselling to get through this crap. I need a large milkshake and some cheesy fries, STAT. Rage partially subsided, I can now safely inform readers of this messy messy tragic tragic review that the next sentences will contain spoilers. So many spoilers they'll sting your eyes. In this lovely (and original, yuck) story of The Little Mermaid, she does trade her voice to the sea witch in exchange for legs, yes. However, our good pal Hans also sees to it that the sea witch actually cuts out her tongue, meaning she will never speak or sing again. She gets her legs though. But wait, what's this? Every time she takes a step it's as if she's walking on blades? OH HOW SWEET. AT LEAST SHE GETS HER LEGS THOUGH! But what about the Prince? OH that prince. The one who calls her dumb all the time, and constantly compares her to some other girl who he *thought* saved his life, when it was actually her all along. The one who drops her as soon as he sees someone who he *thinks* resembles his "rescuer". That DICK. He's an entitled prat with a punchable face and a punchable personality. Shoulda let the bitch drown. Let's see, what else? OH my favourite quotes! What's a book (good or bad) without my favourite quotes, RIGHT!? (Guys, I'm getting hysterical) The prince said she should remain with him always, and she received permission to sleep at his door, on a velvet cushion. HOW KIND. Only the best for The Little Mermaid, amiright? I mean, it's velvet. (I have such a poisonous tone to my voice right now) "If I were forced to choose a bride, I would rather choose you, my dumb foundling." *grumble* Her tender feet felt as if cut with sharp knives, but she cared not for it; a sharper pang had pierced through her heart. Imma take this moment to throw some shade at The Little Mermaid herself. Because Hans inadvertently made me. So you willingly leave your grandmother, father and sisters, whom you love, to try and win the affections of some dude you saved one time. Not only do you agree to cut your tongue out, you also subject yourself to a life of misery because every time you take a fucking step, you're basically stepping on knives. Your feet bleed all over the place, and you just go "oh well. The Prince is a babe so la dee da." You lady, are DUMB. Internet memes are speaking to me now. Let's just stick to the Disney version. The one where Prince Eric is a babe aaaaand they live happilyeverafter THE END. *starts humming under the sea*

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    A hauntingly beautiful story paired with achingly gorgeous illustrations! I'm sorry to say that this is the first time I've read the "actual" story of the Little Mermaid, previously acquainted only with very general retellings and the Disney movie version (which is delightful in its way). This version purports to be closest to Andersen's original as it makes only slight adaptations from the mid-19th century translation by Mary Howitt, a correspondent and friend of Andersen who introduced his wor A hauntingly beautiful story paired with achingly gorgeous illustrations! I'm sorry to say that this is the first time I've read the "actual" story of the Little Mermaid, previously acquainted only with very general retellings and the Disney movie version (which is delightful in its way). This version purports to be closest to Andersen's original as it makes only slight adaptations from the mid-19th century translation by Mary Howitt, a correspondent and friend of Andersen who introduced his work to the English reading public. It is deeper, sadder, and more stirring than the happy-ever-after versions--indeed, this little mermaid not only seeks the love of the prince but the immortality that will be hers if she obtains it (otherwise, mermaids turn to seafoam after their three hundred year life!) Wow!!! Santore's illustrations are so beautiful! I snapped up this edition based on the cover art and am not disappointed by the rest of the illustrations!!! Some of the full-page spreads are so enchanting! I'm not sure I'd recommend this version to most children. The complex plot point of immortality aside (which some parents may or may not wish to delve into!), the story is extremely wordy and long (I even put off reading it since I could read about seven regular picture books in time it took me to read this!) and some pages have only basic margin illustrations and the rest is all text. Also, parents should note that the mermaids in this version have none of the Disney G-rated seashells covering their breasts--usually there is a wisp of hair over the center area, but it could still be viewed by some as too risque for children. Also, some of the parts with the sea-witch might be a little too creepy for sensitive youngsters. These parental cautions aside, I highly recommend this story to adults or older children seeking the "real" story of the Little Mermaid accompanied by artwork you will not soon forget! NOTE TO SELF: Search for Chihiro Iwasaki illustrated edition.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    In Andersen's version of the tale, at the bottom of the sea, five mermaid princesses lived with their father. While they all pined to go to the surface to explore, none of this was permitted until their fifteenth birthdays. One by one, the mermaids ascended on their fifteenth birthdays to explore the outside world, returning with wonderful tales. The youngest is the most excited of all, making her way to the surface, only to help a prince who falls into the sea during a storm. From that day forw In Andersen's version of the tale, at the bottom of the sea, five mermaid princesses lived with their father. While they all pined to go to the surface to explore, none of this was permitted until their fifteenth birthdays. One by one, the mermaids ascended on their fifteenth birthdays to explore the outside world, returning with wonderful tales. The youngest is the most excited of all, making her way to the surface, only to help a prince who falls into the sea during a storm. From that day forward, she vows to find him again and love him like no other. However, to do so would require her to turn in her fish tail for human legs and cause her eternal agony. She is prepared to do this and takes on a few more horrors in order to be a woman. After making the transformation, the former mermaid is unable to convince the prince to marry her, thereby ruining her chances to live happily ever after. There are other horrors, which seem to appear in the original version of children's fairytales. Noe was shocked that the story did not follow the Disney version, though it is interesting to see his reaction to the actual outcome. He liked the story, but admitted that it was sad. I still ask myself what Andersen, the Brothers Grimm, and others who wrote these stories thought when penning such morbid themes into their work.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    The Little Mermaid I grew up with was a sweet and cheerful red head who I could sing along and be happy with, be happy for. She was one of Disney's greatest mutation projects, a character most kids born after the year 1989 would be most familiar with - that was the year of the adaptation of the originally dark and doleful tale of the youngest mer-daughter of the royal underwater empire into something much more luminous and chipper. Don't get me wrong, I loved and lived the Disney concept as a li The Little Mermaid I grew up with was a sweet and cheerful red head who I could sing along and be happy with, be happy for. She was one of Disney's greatest mutation projects, a character most kids born after the year 1989 would be most familiar with - that was the year of the adaptation of the originally dark and doleful tale of the youngest mer-daughter of the royal underwater empire into something much more luminous and chipper. Don't get me wrong, I loved and lived the Disney concept as a little girl, and God bless Ariel's happy soul, I really loved that kid. The Little Mermaid in Hans' original is quiet and pensive, reserved in an alienating manner, and unnamed. She's always and only ever addressed as that - The Little Mermaid, for she was the youngest of the six royal mer-daughters. By all accounts, she was the most beautiful, most graceful, most introverted, and the most musically talented(no one's voice could ever compare to hers). I felt no warmth from her character at all. The story starts out quite ordinarily, as any fairytale would. The narration wasn't whimsical, it lacked the power of mesmerism and wonder but it was strangely and soothingly beautiful, engaging just for the simple fact of being so. Firstly we're introduced to the underwater world, to the 6 royal mer-daughters and their grandmother. We later learn of the mer-tradition, a rite of passage and the great enduring adventure of a mer-child: At the age of 15, they are granted a long awaited permission to rise to the surface of the water and see the world above, they could feed their curiosities, watch and wonder at humans and the human ways that were so different from theirs. For 5 of the royal sisters, it was an adventure, a transitory exhilaration. But for The Little Mermaid - who had to wait the longest for her turn while enduring an hungry fascination only fed fat by the stories her sisters brought back - it was something much more. A calling. And when finally her day arrived, with the flower wreath of blessing from her grandmother, she set out to see her glass world (And here I could feel how impatiently joyous she was; Finally!). During her time above, she happens upon a ship, saves a prince and falls in love with him. He becomes the apotheosis of her dream to be a part of something greater than her. A world so different and uncharted, puzzling. She becomes even more obsessed, more determined to be a part of that world. And one day when her grandmother tells her about the fates of human souls, and the contrasting bleak nothingness of sea foam which awaits all mer-people after they die, she decides to stop wanting, she decides to have it and she pays a heavy price for it. "Then your tail will divide and shrink until it becomes what the people on earth call a pair of shapely legs. But it will hurt; it will feel as if a sharp sword slashed through you. Everyone who sees you will say that you are the most graceful human being they have ever laid eyes on, for you will keep your gliding movement and no dancer will be able to tread as lightly as you. But every step you take will feel as if you were treading upon knife blades so sharp that blood must flow. I am willing to help you, but are you willing to suffer all this?" "Yes," the little mermaid said in a trembling voice, as she thought of the Prince and of gaining a human soul.” ❎ A FAIRYTALE THAT'S MORE THAN JUST A FAIRYTALE "If human beings are not drowned,” asked the little mermaid, “can they live forever? do they never die as we do here in the sea?” “Yes,” replied the old lady, “they must also die, and their term of life is even shorter than ours. We sometimes live to three hundred years, but when we cease to exist here we only become the foam on the surface of the water, and we have not even a grave down here of those we love. We have not immortal souls, we shall never live again; but, like the green sea-weed, when once it has been cut off, we can never flourish more. Human beings, on the contrary, have a soul which lives forever, lives after the body has been turned to dust. It rises up through the clear, pure air beyond the glittering stars. As we rise out of the water, and behold all the land of the earth, so do they rise to unknown and glorious regions which we shall never see.” “Why have not we an immortal soul?” asked the little mermaid mournfully; “I would give gladly all the hundreds of years that I have to live, to be a human being only for one day, and to have the hope of knowing the happiness of that glorious world above the stars.” ⏩ It's that time again. The time when we have to differentiate between want and need. Did The Little Mermaid want or did she need? Because want is flippant, careless, too common and unserious. But with need her actions would be justifiable. Acceptable. It would be easier to feel pity. ⏩ I don't think it's crazy to want to belong, to feel like you could belong to something great, but I don't think it's okay to be selfish about it. And this was how The Little Mermaid began wrongly. It was honestly really sad to read. The extreme choices she made... I would like to say mindlessly, but it would be incorrect to say so, because even though the word would fall right into place, mindless isn't the word to use for - what I would from here on out refer to as - a need great enough to beget such extremeness. But reading her choices wasn't the most saddening part, it was following on helplessly as all her sacrifices and efforts came to naught. After The Little Mermaid becomes human, the Prince finds her and takes custody of her. Yes, custody, not care, because he only loved her as one would love a child. He made several references to the girl who saved him but he never realized she was right there under his very nose. And I swear I found this silly, did they not read and write during that time? But of course, this question was only a consequence of reading such a book in the time of my life when my mind favors logic above all else. So what do you do? Squelch it and read on. ⏩ Through Hans' tale, you find out that the witch who granted The Little Mermaid her wish was just a tool, a passive character in the flow of events. This really intrigued me because in the Disney version, the witch named Ursula was a very antagonistic villain. She became evil so Ariel could shine and be blameless. Hans showed us the reality of life and how choices work. Letting The Little Mermaid take responsibility for her actions. You do the deed, you pay the price and bear the responsibility. It's all you, it can be that linear and there's no villain sometimes, sometimes you become the villain, your very own antagonist. ⏩ Hans captured the beauty of life - and afterlife, the mystery of it's meaningfulness and meaninglessness. The Little Mermaid saw the human world through a glass window. She idolized that world. She wanted to have a soul, to bask in quality and damn quantity, for what is a hundred years if you have not love, hope, passion, happiness and equals in opposite to show for it? Is it wrong to aspire to greater, to look at life as beyond the horizon and not through myopic eyes? And if mundane contentment will not do, how much are you willing to give up to achieve such glorious living? How much is okay to give up? And this leads me to this old, lost word: Sacrifice. Leave your father, your sisters and the world you know, for a boy you don't know but place all your hopes on. Leave never to return again. Make him fall in love with you completely and marry him or you will die. Give up your voice, your tongue, and hurt every time you walk. All this for the unknown. Stupid isn't it? Nowadays no one makes such potentially destructive investments without guarantees. And to what end was it all? More sacrifice . Sacrifice is the thematic centre of this story. The Little Mermaid's final act of sacrifice was striking. She was offered one final chance to save herself after the Prince married a Princess from another land. Your life or the life of the one who failed you? The dream that failed you. It's one thing to take away from this tale. In spite of her pain, regardless of it, of her failures and losses, she made her last choice. And she was rewarded for it. ⏩ One little grievance of mine. If a man should fall so much in love with you that you were dearer to him than his mother and father… and he let a priest take his right hand and put it in yours, while he promised to be eternally true to you, then his soul would flow into your body and you would be able to partake of human happiness. He can give you a soul and yet keep his own HOW ABSURD I don't know why I found this idea absolutely appalling. But the thought of sharing my soul with anyone - even if it wouldn't mean fracturing it or living a half-life, even if I would still get to keep and own it - is an absolute and squeamish NO NO for me. They never mentioned it, but I imagine there will be consequences of such an aberrancy. So I guess you could say this was a bumpy ride. I'm happy I could read and appreciate this, personally, but no I will not read this to my little girl(when the time comes) because I don't want her thinking it's okay to cut your tongue and sell your voice to the local witch for the love of a boy who would rub your handicap in your face by calling you dumb - and it doesn't matter if he meant to be romantic about it because who amongst us knows how to associate the word dumb with romance? - and tells you you could sleep at his door, as if it's one mighty privilege. If you can't do it to your dog then don't do it to a human being(No, I didn't mean it the other way around). This story was really nice and faithful to the rules of fairytale land in the beginning...and then it turned sour, then ugly, then nasty, then morbid, then horrific, depressing and cathartic... in the end I got the significance of the story. Now it's time to be thoughtful and gauge if the hassle was worth it. 4/5 stars for the affect.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Britany

    Wow-- I knew this would be drastically different the the flame colored heroine of Disney's creation, but I don't know that I was prepared for this. For most of the book (almost 3/4) the story remains mostly the same. A young daughter of a widowed merman and her grandmother are raising her and her multitude of sister mermaids. On her 16th birthday, she spies a prince on a ship and then rescues his life from the sea. She also makes a trade with the sea witch, but the terms of the deal are much mor Wow-- I knew this would be drastically different the the flame colored heroine of Disney's creation, but I don't know that I was prepared for this. For most of the book (almost 3/4) the story remains mostly the same. A young daughter of a widowed merman and her grandmother are raising her and her multitude of sister mermaids. On her 16th birthday, she spies a prince on a ship and then rescues his life from the sea. She also makes a trade with the sea witch, but the terms of the deal are much more gruesome than I would have imagined and the ending simply left me aghast. Really glad that I finally can say that I've read the original.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Merphy Napier

    I know this has really high ratings but I still feel like I shouldn't have loved this as much as I did. It was so tragically awesome. I love that it didn't have a happy ending. It was weird as snot but I loved it.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chelsey Ellice

    The Disney version of The Little Mermaid is so much better. It’s a happy ending!! The original story, which is this, doesn’t end how I expected. It was so sad. I did enjoy the rest though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sandra

    Oh this story will always remind me of my childhood, so of course this is a five star story

  14. 5 out of 5

    Candace Robinson

    I know the original story but had never actually read it. So I grabbed the ARC for the upcoming, new, illustrated version. Let me just say I’ve only read one Andersen book which was that horrific Christmas tree story! Thank all those dead trees that this story was much better. I loved this one! First, I really loved the mermaid and her naiveness because she really didn’t know much better yet she had a heart of gold. The prince was a douche bag so I was glad about the ending and that there was stil I know the original story but had never actually read it. So I grabbed the ARC for the upcoming, new, illustrated version. Let me just say I’ve only read one Andersen book which was that horrific Christmas tree story! Thank all those dead trees that this story was much better. I loved this one! First, I really loved the mermaid and her naiveness because she really didn’t know much better yet she had a heart of gold. The prince was a douche bag so I was glad about the ending and that there was still hope for our girl!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula W

    There isn't much to like about this story. A young mermaid finds out she doesn't have a soul and will end up as nothing more than sea foam after her death, so she goes about stalking a human she hopes will fall in love with her and give her part of his soul. Which could work, I guess, if she hadn't gotten her tongue cut out or if the human didn't see her as a pet instead of a serious love interest. He even had her sleeping outside his room on a cushion. ͡¯\_(°_o)_/¯

  16. 5 out of 5

    Anya

    This is horrifying and tragic and I really loved it

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nalia

    “But a mermaid has no tears, and therefore she suffers so much more.” I actually re-read this, i've read this once i was a kid. Basically, i grew up with Hans Christian Andersen's book and The Little Mermaid is always be my favorite. If you know the little mermaid from Disney then think the ending was happy ending and they live happily ever after, you can't found it here. The little mermaid that i know was sad story. This is about the sacrifice that Little Mermaid made for her love. She left her “But a mermaid has no tears, and therefore she suffers so much more.” I actually re-read this, i've read this once i was a kid. Basically, i grew up with Hans Christian Andersen's book and The Little Mermaid is always be my favorite. If you know the little mermaid from Disney then think the ending was happy ending and they live happily ever after, you can't found it here. The little mermaid that i know was sad story. This is about the sacrifice that Little Mermaid made for her love. She left her beautiful life and her family for the man that actually never know what's her feeling or what she has done to him. He never know that he can live because The Little Mermaid save his life. For him, The Little Mermaid will do anything. She give up her voice to be a human who can live with her love. Not only that, she must win the prince's heart otherwise she would turn into the foam of the sea. So, you won't found the happily ever after between the Little Mermaid with the Prince, because the Prince didn't love the Little Mermaid, and when the Little Mermaid have a choice between her life and Prince's life in other to get her old live, still the Little Mermaid choose to save her prince and sacrifice herself. So she die and become the foam of the sea...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I choose to give it 5 stars because of the lovely way in which it is written, but, umm, still in a bit of a shock at the surprise ending, after being attuned to the blissful elixir of the Disney version all these years.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Briar's Reviews

    The illustrated The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Anderson and Bernadette is a marvellous little tale that recounts the exact story of The Little Mermaid. The illustrations are very soft and subtle, making this story feel more whimsical than how dark it actually is. I did enjoy re-reading this fairy tale and taking a trip down memory lane, with the help of some pictures this time around! I appreciate new versions of these stories coming out with new pictures to help bring the classics back to The illustrated The Little Mermaid by Hans Christian Anderson and Bernadette is a marvellous little tale that recounts the exact story of The Little Mermaid. The illustrations are very soft and subtle, making this story feel more whimsical than how dark it actually is. I did enjoy re-reading this fairy tale and taking a trip down memory lane, with the help of some pictures this time around! I appreciate new versions of these stories coming out with new pictures to help bring the classics back to life. My only complaint is that this version it felt like it didn't bring anything new to the story. It was just new pictures. I understand it's an exact replica with new pictures, but I wanted a little more? Maybe more exciting pictures with brighter (or even darker) colours? This soft palette just didn't feel like it matched much. It felt more Disney than Hans Christian Andersen. Three out of five stars. Thank you to NetGalley and NorthSouth Books for providing me a free copy of this book in exchange of an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is the first time I've read this original story (of possibly my favorite Disney movie). And obviously, it's a completely different experience, and the story is one that's been told in many forms throughout the last century at least. I did feel that it was closer to the Disney version than say, Snow White/Briar Rose. While I still don't like the less-than-happy ending, I enjoyed the story, imagery, etc enough to give it 4 stars. Probably my favorite of HCA's tales that I've read so far.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steph

    Well I had heard this version was very different from the Disney version and oh was it different. I think it's a little bizarre if I'm honest but definitely not our ordinary happily ever after which I think I like.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mel (Epic Reading)

    Beautifully illustrated with a palette of blues, greens and soft colours; this is the original little mermaid story and so vicious and painful. No Disney happy fairy tale magic exists in the original text that Hans Christian Andersen wrote. Additionally the story is longer than your average children's book, but I didn't mind as reading the delicate font allowed me to also be immersed in each pages beautiful illustrations. It's important to note that Andersen first published this story in 1836. T Beautifully illustrated with a palette of blues, greens and soft colours; this is the original little mermaid story and so vicious and painful. No Disney happy fairy tale magic exists in the original text that Hans Christian Andersen wrote. Additionally the story is longer than your average children's book, but I didn't mind as reading the delicate font allowed me to also be immersed in each pages beautiful illustrations. It's important to note that Andersen first published this story in 1836. To say that relations between men and women have changed over the last 250+ years would be an understatement. So be forewarned the original masculine domination themes, the trickery and subservience of women is portrayed here along with more. A lot of critique has been tossed at The Little Mermaid over the years; and rightfully so. It's not a pleasant story; and yet somehow our heroine ends up with a happy ending. This really highlights that the belief of the day was that the suffering of women would be rewarded in the afterlife. A very Christian belief that fits nicely into the rhetoric of the 1800's. I first read this original text when I was about 8 years old. Disney had just released their version of Ariel (1989) and I was obsessed (as little girls tend to be over Disney movies). The songs, the excitement, and my favourite part, Ursula. As I grew older I came to realize that I never saw myself being a princess; but if I was any character it was likely to be the clever villain. Interpret that as you will (lol). I also realized I shouldn't trust any Disney movie ever again! What really stuck with me, right up to today, from this original story, is that pain and suffering is usually required in order to gain something you desire. Not a bad lesson for an 8-year-old. I did wonder what my Mom was hoping I'd get from the story at the time. As an adult we discussed it and she told me that all she ever tried to do was ensure I had enough reading material as I blew through books in minutes, not hours. Content became irrelevant as I got older as she figured I'd ask questions if I had any; and just wanted to keep me reading. If you want a copy of the original story this is a beautifully illustrated version. I definitely recommend this latest edition from NorthSouth Books. If you are hoping for some nostalgia towards the Disney movie or story this is really not for you. For today's young girls it's probably worth having them read it and then setting up a conversation about how they feel about: the outcome of the story, what they think of Ariel taking on voluntary pain to be with Eric, and if there is a level of pain or suffering that is unreasonable. My thought here is that a little girl might think that a man who loves her and occasionally beats her is acceptable based on this story (for example). Of course that is up to each individual parent to decide. I would not recommend this as a gift for a little girl you don't know really well or know how the parents might react. It's a bit too vicious to be loved by many; and it veers so far away from the Disney story that I could see some parents who have not read it being upset by the content. Please note: I received an eARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. This is an honest and unbiased review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eman

    Disney's The Little Mermaid is one of my favorite animated movies. The book is even better. I personally assume that when Hans Christian Andersen wrote The Little Mermaid, he didn't intend it for little children even though the theme is kinda childish. It's more suitable for teens, or can fit in the YA genre more than Children's Literature. The book is so beautifully written with a creative touch on the mer-people and a deep take on self-sacrifice. It doesn't have your typical happy ending we're Disney's The Little Mermaid is one of my favorite animated movies. The book is even better. I personally assume that when Hans Christian Andersen wrote The Little Mermaid, he didn't intend it for little children even though the theme is kinda childish. It's more suitable for teens, or can fit in the YA genre more than Children's Literature. The book is so beautifully written with a creative touch on the mer-people and a deep take on self-sacrifice. It doesn't have your typical happy ending we're used to in fairy tales. It also contains some nudity, so when The Little Mermaid realizes that she's naked she basically covers herself up with her long hair. Morals of the story: - Blind/unconditional love sucks. If you sacrifice yourself for the one you truly love, he/she may not be worthy of your sacrifice. - Some men are selfish jerks. Even if you're drop-dead-gorgeous, they turn their back on you as soon they lay their eyes on another hot chick.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ken

    Having visited The Little Mermaid statue on a visit to Copenhagen in 2014, this was an obvious choice for Denmark in my #WorldCupInBooks challenge this summer. It’s hard not to compare it to the Disney version, but I was quite surprised how of the animated movie owed to the original story. Once a Mermaid reaches 15 years of age, they’re allowed to go up to the surface. When The Little Mermaid reaches this age, she rises up and watches a prince celebrating he’s birthday on a ship. During a storm the Having visited The Little Mermaid statue on a visit to Copenhagen in 2014, this was an obvious choice for Denmark in my #WorldCupInBooks challenge this summer. It’s hard not to compare it to the Disney version, but I was quite surprised how of the animated movie owed to the original story. Once a Mermaid reaches 15 years of age, they’re allowed to go up to the surface. When The Little Mermaid reaches this age, she rises up and watches a prince celebrating he’s birthday on a ship. During a storm the ship sinks and the Mermaid saves the prince. She soon falls in love and wishes to live on the land as a human. The story has a darker ending as The Little Mermaid’s pact with the Sea Witch is much more sinister, in the context of the short fairy tale I felt that it worked quite well. Thought of course I prefer the Disney version!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Reading_ Tam_ Ishly

    Expect this: this book is more of words than of illustrations. The artstyle is a bit underwhelming but it works for the book which I guess it's original purpose is to tell the story as it is. I loved it. But I cannot say the same about the artstyle or the choice of colours used. It's a bit underwhelming but also quite intimidating to the eyes. I expected more from this book I guess judging from its cover. I cannot help getting disappointed as I kept on reading the book. I would have appreciated th Expect this: this book is more of words than of illustrations. The artstyle is a bit underwhelming but it works for the book which I guess it's original purpose is to tell the story as it is. I loved it. But I cannot say the same about the artstyle or the choice of colours used. It's a bit underwhelming but also quite intimidating to the eyes. I expected more from this book I guess judging from its cover. I cannot help getting disappointed as I kept on reading the book. I would have appreciated the book more if the book was represented as it is with minimal illustrations. Because the narration is amazing and in-depth. The illustrations or the colour hues might work well with the physical version of the finished copy with possible glossy bigger pages. Thanks #NetGalley for the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Amina

    He loves her like a pet, because she's devoted to him. She's allowed to sleep on his doorstep on a velvet cushion He will marry because he can't marry the one he loves Mr. prince: He loves her like a pet, because she's devoted to him. She's allowed to sleep on his doorstep on a velvet cushion He will marry because he can't marry the one he loves Mr. prince:

  27. 5 out of 5

    Natsu

    This is a re-read. My parents bought me a book of fairy tales when I was a kid. Even then I found it waaaaaaay better than the deluded "happily-ever-after" thing which Disney presented (I've read the Disney book, but I never watched the animated movie). Don't get me wrong, I've nothing against Disney, I love "Frozen" and Belle's (actually The Beast's) Library. It shows that life isn't all peachy. There's pain, sacrifice, and defeat in between and sometimes... there is no happy ending unless you l This is a re-read. My parents bought me a book of fairy tales when I was a kid. Even then I found it waaaaaaay better than the deluded "happily-ever-after" thing which Disney presented (I've read the Disney book, but I never watched the animated movie). Don't get me wrong, I've nothing against Disney, I love "Frozen" and Belle's (actually The Beast's) Library. It shows that life isn't all peachy. There's pain, sacrifice, and defeat in between and sometimes... there is no happy ending unless you look at the big picture.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    The Little Mermaid, illustrated by Chihiro Iwasaki. For someone who doesn't particularly like the story of The Little Mermaid, I do seem to read it fairly often! From the abbreviated version illustrated by Katie Thamer Treherne, which I found pretty, but unremarkable, to the complete translation, accompanied by the distinctive artwork of noted fairy-tale interpreter, Lisbeth Zwerger, this popular tale has been retold numerous times. The artwork in Michael Hague's edition has always struck me as r The Little Mermaid, illustrated by Chihiro Iwasaki. For someone who doesn't particularly like the story of The Little Mermaid, I do seem to read it fairly often! From the abbreviated version illustrated by Katie Thamer Treherne, which I found pretty, but unremarkable, to the complete translation, accompanied by the distinctive artwork of noted fairy-tale interpreter, Lisbeth Zwerger, this popular tale has been retold numerous times. The artwork in Michael Hague's edition has always struck me as rather repellent, and oddly ill-suited to the story, whereas Sulamith Wülfing's is the most gorgeous I have seen. It is Charles Santore's retelling, however, that best captures (visually speaking) my own sense of the story. This edition, illustrated by the marvelous Japanese children's book artist, Chihiro Iwasaki - whose work has been so influential, that there are two museums dedicated to her, in Japan - is the sixth retelling of Hans Christian Andersen's famous tale that I have reviewed in my recent Andersen project, and its chief appeal lies in its dreamy watercolor vistas. Like her work on Andersen's The Red Shoes , Iwasaki's illustrations make wonderful use of color, and convey a sense of almost constant motion, something particularly appropriate in her underwater scenes. I can't say that this is my favorite style of illustration, but it is certainly beautiful, for all that. The text of this 1984 edition is translated by the prolific Anthea Bell, which I found quite interesting, as she also worked on the subsequent 2004 edition illustrated by Lisbeth Zwerger. Unlike that second version, however, which was a faithful and complete translation, this Little Mermaid is somewhat abbreviated, and leaves out a number of details, from the surface tales told by the Little Mermaid's sisters, to the final passage concerning her duties as a spirit of the air. The text and illustrations work well together, so I would say that the editorial decisions here are sound. Still, this edition is long out-of-print, so unless the reader is particularly interested (as am I) in Iwasaki's work, I would advise looking for a more recent retelling.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Sorbello

    Synopsis: The Little Mermaid lives in an underwater kingdom with her father, the sea king; her grandmother and her five elder sisters. When a mermaid turns 15, she is allowed to swim to the surface to watch the world above, and as the sisters become old enough, one of them visits the surface every year. When the Little Mermaid's turn comes, she ventures to the surface, sees a ship with a handsome prince, and falls in love with him from a distance. In order to earn his affection, she has to make Synopsis: The Little Mermaid lives in an underwater kingdom with her father, the sea king; her grandmother and her five elder sisters. When a mermaid turns 15, she is allowed to swim to the surface to watch the world above, and as the sisters become old enough, one of them visits the surface every year. When the Little Mermaid's turn comes, she ventures to the surface, sees a ship with a handsome prince, and falls in love with him from a distance. In order to earn his affection, she has to make a few sacrifices. Review: Ariel has her tongue cut out so she can't speak, her tail chopped off so she can never rejoin her family in the sea, and in return, she's given legs to walk on land to finally be with the prince that earned her love. Things don't end happily ever after, however. Walking on legs that bleed as if she's constantly stepping on knives, unable to explain how she feels or what she's thinking, and unable to win the love of the person she sacrificed everything for, Ariel is doomed to a lonely existence in purgatory where she's reduced to seafoam and unable to be with the people of the land or the people of the sea. By sacrificing what mattered most, Ariel ended up with nothing. I love the darker tone and the harsher lessons that can be learned from the original version of the story. It's a brutally honest tale that warns people that sometimes no amount of sacrifices or hard work will guarantee that something will turn out the way you expect, and sometimes we devote our time, affection and attention to people that are worthy of none of these things; losing what really matters in the process. Setting yourself up with unrealistic ideals and motivations often leads to self-destruction. So, what can be learned from Ariel's tragic downfall? Make your goals realistic and be careful who you give your heart to. *** My Social Media My Instagram Account: https://www.instagram.com/michael_sor... My Wattpad Account: https://www.wattpad.com/user/Michael-... My YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCPPs... My Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/SorbelloHorror My Facebook Account: https://www.facebook.com/michael.sorb...

  30. 4 out of 5

    The Rebel Scribe

    The Little Mermaid has been one of my favorite Disney movies since I saw it in theaters. I was a tiny thing and when I got the VHS I would play it as much as I could. The original story isn't exactly like the Disney version. It's a bit darker but has a similar message to it. I actually prefer this version to be honest. I'm not going to spoil anything about it because I know it's one of those classics that everyone wants to read or has been putting off reading, counting me. I finally read it sinc The Little Mermaid has been one of my favorite Disney movies since I saw it in theaters. I was a tiny thing and when I got the VHS I would play it as much as I could. The original story isn't exactly like the Disney version. It's a bit darker but has a similar message to it. I actually prefer this version to be honest. I'm not going to spoil anything about it because I know it's one of those classics that everyone wants to read or has been putting off reading, counting me. I finally read it since I realized how short it was. I just have to say that after reading Peter Pan and Alice in Wonderland and disliking them both. I feel good knowing that one of my favorite Disney movie's source material isn't a let down. I really loved this story, it was dark but filled with this raw emotion. It really was what I need to read tonight.

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