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A Man Called Trent (Leisure Historical Fiction)

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Set in New Mexico, A Man Called Trent opens to a nester named Dick Moffitt lying dead where he was killed by King Bill Hale's riders. Sally Crane, who is sixteen and was adopted by Moffitt, and Moffitt's fou8rteen-year-old Jack witnessed the murder from their hiding place.


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Set in New Mexico, A Man Called Trent opens to a nester named Dick Moffitt lying dead where he was killed by King Bill Hale's riders. Sally Crane, who is sixteen and was adopted by Moffitt, and Moffitt's fou8rteen-year-old Jack witnessed the murder from their hiding place.

30 review for A Man Called Trent (Leisure Historical Fiction)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barnabas Piper

    Classic L'Amour - so reliable and enjoyable for exactly what it is.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nick Dupree

    Another hero against villainy, alias "Trent," is deeper and more complex than most of the L'Amour protagonists I've become acquainted with so far. He's tough, but he's become tired of all the shooting and bloodshed that's commonplace on the lawless frontier. and a darkness weighs on him. Sick of all the "Badman" nonsense, he's taken an alias, "Trent," and hung up the gun belt permanently in rural New Mexico Territory, or so he thought. When "King" Bill Hale, local land baron and expert off-scree Another hero against villainy, alias "Trent," is deeper and more complex than most of the L'Amour protagonists I've become acquainted with so far. He's tough, but he's become tired of all the shooting and bloodshed that's commonplace on the lawless frontier. and a darkness weighs on him. Sick of all the "Badman" nonsense, he's taken an alias, "Trent," and hung up the gun belt permanently in rural New Mexico Territory, or so he thought. When "King" Bill Hale, local land baron and expert off-screen villain, decides to claim the entire valley, he sends his thugs in to shoot and burn everyone farming and homesteading in the valley, including "Trent," who's trying to settle down there. He and his neighbors, including some comically battle-eager Hatfields (of the Kentucky back-country Hatfield-McCoy feud) homesteading in the valley, band together to resist Hale. "Trent" soon comes up with a plan and takes up the gun belt again. Like most L'Amour dime novels, it's not the plot that gives it value. The plot is the standard Western fare, and in parts lumbers along in a way that would bore many (hence 3 stars). But I love fiction that immerses the reader in its world, and this novella does that. Descriptions like "between the rows of saloons, dance halls, stores, and stables, a river of dirt, sand and mud that passed for the town's main street" and "a burro wandered sleepily through the town" create an atmosphere, really drawing you in. Those little peeks into the Old Southwest are where L'Amour shines. I do wish our beautiful half-Irish/half-Mexican love interest had been explored more instead of left a two-dimensional "damsel-in-distress," all her lines expressing distress. Good casual reading. An off-shoot of L'Amour's "Kilkenny" series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Two novellas featuring the beginning of the Kilkenny series. This 2006 compilation of Louis L'Amour material shows the late author's estate is still repackaging his pulp stories 18 years after the prolific author's death. Kilkenny series - two pulp novellas featuring Lance Kilkenny, originally published in 1947 under the byline Jim Mayo. #0.1a "The Rider of Lost Creek" was expanded and published as an original paperback in 1976. #0.1b "A Man Called Trent" was reworked and published as the origina Two novellas featuring the beginning of the Kilkenny series. This 2006 compilation of Louis L'Amour material shows the late author's estate is still repackaging his pulp stories 18 years after the prolific author's death. Kilkenny series - two pulp novellas featuring Lance Kilkenny, originally published in 1947 under the byline Jim Mayo. #0.1a "The Rider of Lost Creek" was expanded and published as an original paperback in 1976. #0.1b "A Man Called Trent" was reworked and published as the original paperback "The Mountain Valley War" in 1978.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd Hinkle

    Always love Louis L"Amour books. His description of the area and people makes you feel as if you are there.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Angie

    Trent is a "nester" just trying to make a home for himself in the New Mexico hills. He keeps to himself and doesn't want trouble. But trouble finds him in the way of King Bill Hale. Hale owns most of the land in the area and now wants it all. His name has gone to his head and he thinks he actually is king. So he is driving all the nesters out of the high country any way he can. Trent bands together with the other nesters to fight Hale and keep their rightful claims. So it turns out Trent is actu Trent is a "nester" just trying to make a home for himself in the New Mexico hills. He keeps to himself and doesn't want trouble. But trouble finds him in the way of King Bill Hale. Hale owns most of the land in the area and now wants it all. His name has gone to his head and he thinks he actually is king. So he is driving all the nesters out of the high country any way he can. Trent bands together with the other nesters to fight Hale and keep their rightful claims. So it turns out Trent is actually Kilkenny, a famous gunman, who has hung up his guns for a life of peace. But when trouble comes calling he is willing to take up those guns again. This story is pure Louis L'Amour even though it is one I haven't read. Confession: I read many a Louis L'Amour book in my teen years and quite enjoyed them. These books are good stories even if they are pretty formulaic. There is the typical western strongman trying to take over and the good people who are willing to stand up to him. It isn't particularly to my tastes now, but it is entertaining.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim Murphy

    A man called "Trent" who, we discover three pages into the book is really Lance Kilkenny of "Kilkenny" fame, wanders into a remote western town where the "law" is whatever King Bill Hale says it is. "Trent" joins forces with the other oppressed people and...you can figure out where this one goes. I'm a fan of Louis L'Amour. I have two problems with this book: First, if you are going to call your protagonist "Trent", then make him "Trent" and hold the revelation of his true identity to somewhere A man called "Trent" who, we discover three pages into the book is really Lance Kilkenny of "Kilkenny" fame, wanders into a remote western town where the "law" is whatever King Bill Hale says it is. "Trent" joins forces with the other oppressed people and...you can figure out where this one goes. I'm a fan of Louis L'Amour. I have two problems with this book: First, if you are going to call your protagonist "Trent", then make him "Trent" and hold the revelation of his true identity to somewhere near the climax (especially if that's your title.) Page 3 is, well, just FAR too early. Second, at some point in his early career, L'Amour rewickered "Trent" into "The Mountain Valley War", a good read. "A Man Called Trent" just retells that story, in a poorer way that even the author understood, so it has the feel of publishers asking "how can we repackage everything the man ever wrote and squeeze a little more money out of it?" 'Twould have been better to leave it in the pile of unpublished books. This story was already told.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sep

    Trent, the main character, is dealing with a murdered neighbor and his orphaned children right off the bat. Trent and a group of small farmers have settled on the ridge out of the way of the local big cattle baron. The cattle baron, faced with a drought, hankers after the lush, stream-filed ridge and can think of only one way to get it and that involves threats, guns and, if necessary, murder. Trent turns out to be an old friend living under an assumed name AND has the possibility of romance in h Trent, the main character, is dealing with a murdered neighbor and his orphaned children right off the bat. Trent and a group of small farmers have settled on the ridge out of the way of the local big cattle baron. The cattle baron, faced with a drought, hankers after the lush, stream-filed ridge and can think of only one way to get it and that involves threats, guns and, if necessary, murder. Trent turns out to be an old friend living under an assumed name AND has the possibility of romance in his future.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Radigan

    Yes, Louis L'Amour's stories are formulaic-the bad guys lose and the good guys win. But no worse than, say, detective stories where the detective invariably solves the mystery. It's not a question of the outcome so much as how the story gets to it. Who are the real villains, who dies, who escapes? Admittedly this story has problems. Some characters act in ways you would not believe, and the ending is rather anticlimactic. But overall a decent read

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally

    One of my favorite Louis L'Amours. A story about a reluctant gunfighter fighting to keep his land. Wonderfully described boxing scenes and shootouts. My only problem is the women in this story are a little helpless. If you can get past that, it's a great read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    If you like westerns, you'll enjoy this one.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wilson E. Stevens Sr.

    This book has two short novels in it, the last one called "A Man Called Trent". Both are very good stories, and it was an enjoyable read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanne Stacey

    I'm not usually an old western book kinda gal, but I read these every-so-often because it reminds me of my grandmother. Miss you!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rob

    This was a great story with lots of action from start to finish. This was a Good Read

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Baker

    The story is very much a product of its time. It has not aged well: the ideals it espouses as good, honorable and worth pursuing are no longer considered as such, and it is just not for me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    xtian

    Fantastic

  16. 5 out of 5

    Stan Blackburn

    I love a good Western, and Lois Lamour is one of the best. Trent is right up there with Hondo and Shane.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Morris Graham

    The second of L'Amour's Kilkenny series. Lance Kilkenny is is sick of killing. He is a gunfighter that has always stayed on the right side of a fight, but has amassed a considerable reputation. Kilkenny has just come from a considerable fight that nearly killed him. Deciding that his luck can't hold forever, he changes his name to Trent and settles in the high country above a valley with some other "nesters" who have filed legal claims with the government and are building homes and their dreams, The second of L'Amour's Kilkenny series. Lance Kilkenny is is sick of killing. He is a gunfighter that has always stayed on the right side of a fight, but has amassed a considerable reputation. Kilkenny has just come from a considerable fight that nearly killed him. Deciding that his luck can't hold forever, he changes his name to Trent and settles in the high country above a valley with some other "nesters" who have filed legal claims with the government and are building homes and their dreams, trying to raise their families in peace. The local land baron, "King Bill" Hale, decides even though he owns most of town and all the grass of the valley, he wants the grass at the higher elevations, and is willing to drive the nesters out to get it. A man gets killed while resisting King Bill's eviction notice. Trouble has found Kilkenny, and he eventually has to strap his pistols back on and take on the king of the valley. True, there are not a whole lot of different plots in a western, mostly about land. But, L'Amour does it masterfully, developing the characters, giving us a double-helping of western lore, terrain and a smattering of history to his action-packed story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Laura Beth

    I liked this book a lot. I read mostly romance so this is definitely a change of genre for me, but I read a lot of Louis L'Amour back when I was in high school and saw the audio book on my online library and got nostalgic. This was a good, short read. It reads like a B western, but that is what made it so enjoyable. I could almost see Clint Eastwood or Lee Van Cleef playing the lead role. L'Amour does an excellent job at describing the old west and the story was interesting without being overly I liked this book a lot. I read mostly romance so this is definitely a change of genre for me, but I read a lot of Louis L'Amour back when I was in high school and saw the audio book on my online library and got nostalgic. This was a good, short read. It reads like a B western, but that is what made it so enjoyable. I could almost see Clint Eastwood or Lee Van Cleef playing the lead role. L'Amour does an excellent job at describing the old west and the story was interesting without being overly deep. (I wasn't looking for a treatise on political issues of the old west or the atrocities committed by the white men.)

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ted

    In memory of my father I picked up a classic Western. While he and my sister and I have very different taste in books, we all love stories, and I remember how he consumed Westerns by the armload. As to this one: the language and characters are iconic (which is the nice way of saying cliched past the point of parody) and the story needs no recap. Good guys are good, badies are bad, women are women. That's that.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jmrathbone

    The second in the Kilkenny Saga novels and I think the better of the two. The plot is more complete and the characters are better defined. L’Amour gets a little philosophical when he writes (speaking of the early settlers) “In such a country men would be born, men who loved liberty and would ever fight to preserve it”.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    A follow-up to L'Amour's "The Rider of Lost Creek". This novel again features Lance Kilkenny, a "good" gunfighter, as he moves to a new location to settle another war between western cattlemen in the 1880s. Great fun.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Maurynne Maxwell

    Discovered it's a re-release of 2 novellas I have read. I wish publishers wouldn't do this...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mike Brand

    I just wanted something easy to read and to try out the Library2go options. I enjoyed the book, though it was somewhat predictable.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Nice western. It was a little corny, but not enough to ruin it. I did not, however, like the reader.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Light

    Great story. Young kids witness the death of the pa and then have to trust a stranger to get them back on their feet and safe.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dan Panke

    It's tough to beat the consistency that Louis L'Amour has with writing western stories. Another classic.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Gonzalez

    a quick read, but got bored from the start because it was the basic Western scenario.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ken Schloman

    Great early L'Amour. The book is actually two novellas published in the pulp magazine"West" in 1947 under the name Jim Mayo.If you like westerns, this is a must read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Really not his best. Slow and ponderous. Dull.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    One of his better efforts.

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