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The ninth in the Edgar(r) Award-nominated series featuring midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Sergeant Malloy in turn-of-the-century New York City. Sarah Brandt has made her uneasy way to Chinatown to deliver a baby. There she meets a group of Irish women who, completely alone at Ellis Island, married Chinese men in the same predicament. But even as a new century dawns, N The ninth in the Edgar(r) Award-nominated series featuring midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Sergeant Malloy in turn-of-the-century New York City. Sarah Brandt has made her uneasy way to Chinatown to deliver a baby. There she meets a group of Irish women who, completely alone at Ellis Island, married Chinese men in the same predicament. But even as a new century dawns, New Yorkers still cling to their own kind, scorning children of mixed races. When the new mother's half-Chinese, half-Irish niece goes missing, Sarah knows that alerting the police will accomplish nothing, and seeks the one person she can turn to-Detective Sergeant Malloy. And when the missing girl is found dead in a Chinatown alley, Sarah and Malloy have ample suspects in her murder-from both sides of Canal Street.


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The ninth in the Edgar(r) Award-nominated series featuring midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Sergeant Malloy in turn-of-the-century New York City. Sarah Brandt has made her uneasy way to Chinatown to deliver a baby. There she meets a group of Irish women who, completely alone at Ellis Island, married Chinese men in the same predicament. But even as a new century dawns, N The ninth in the Edgar(r) Award-nominated series featuring midwife Sarah Brandt and Detective Sergeant Malloy in turn-of-the-century New York City. Sarah Brandt has made her uneasy way to Chinatown to deliver a baby. There she meets a group of Irish women who, completely alone at Ellis Island, married Chinese men in the same predicament. But even as a new century dawns, New Yorkers still cling to their own kind, scorning children of mixed races. When the new mother's half-Chinese, half-Irish niece goes missing, Sarah knows that alerting the police will accomplish nothing, and seeks the one person she can turn to-Detective Sergeant Malloy. And when the missing girl is found dead in a Chinatown alley, Sarah and Malloy have ample suspects in her murder-from both sides of Canal Street.

30 review for Murder in Chinatown

  1. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    Number nine in this excellent series. I was unaware just how much of a melting pot New York was at the turn of the century. Italians, Chinese, Irish all trying for a better life and none of them ready to accept other nationalities as being as good as themselves. Sarah Brandt does not care. She delivers babies from any and every family. In Murder in Chinatown, as the title suggests, she attends the delivery of a new baby in a Chinese family. As usual Sarah becomes embroiled in the affairs of the fa Number nine in this excellent series. I was unaware just how much of a melting pot New York was at the turn of the century. Italians, Chinese, Irish all trying for a better life and none of them ready to accept other nationalities as being as good as themselves. Sarah Brandt does not care. She delivers babies from any and every family. In Murder in Chinatown, as the title suggests, she attends the delivery of a new baby in a Chinese family. As usual Sarah becomes embroiled in the affairs of the family and then when murder occurs Frank Molloy is involved too. This was an intricate and tricky murder case with a large number of possible suspects of whom the actual murderer was possibly the least likely! I enjoyed it very much and guessed the culprit mere seconds before Molloy did. This series is managing to stay consistently good. I am looking forward to the next one:)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jonetta

    Midwife Sarah Brandt goes to Chinatown for a delivery and eventually gets caught up in some family drama regarding a missing teen, Angel Lee. Determined to not get involved in another potentially dangerous situation, she seeks advice from Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy who does provide some useful information. However, when the girl is later found murdered, Sarah asks Frank for help in finding her killer. The story centered around the Lee family, two Irish women married to Chinese men and their Midwife Sarah Brandt goes to Chinatown for a delivery and eventually gets caught up in some family drama regarding a missing teen, Angel Lee. Determined to not get involved in another potentially dangerous situation, she seeks advice from Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy who does provide some useful information. However, when the girl is later found murdered, Sarah asks Frank for help in finding her killer. The story centered around the Lee family, two Irish women married to Chinese men and their mixed-race children. I was unfamiliar with the Chinese Exclusion Act, signed into law in 1882, prohibiting all immigration of Chinese laborers. It was built on the 1875 Page Act that banned Chinese women from immigrating to the US. Those men who had already immigrated had no alternative but to marry women of other races. Irish girls in particular were known to marry Chinese men who offered them a higher standard of living and made better husbands. Of course, the women were often ostracized by their families and their children faced discrimination. I like how the author doesn’t shy away from the realities of the era and I learned a lot about the effect of the immigration policy on the Chinese community. The case was fascinating and I went down the wrong path in solving the mystery, falling victim to a few red herrings. I really liked how Sarah and Frank worked together, with him reaching out to her for help this time. This was another entertaining and educational story in a series I’ve come to love.

  3. 4 out of 5

    tamar

    This is book nine in the Gaslight Mystery Series by Victoria Thompson. I love this series but I had to take a huge break when after eight books, Suzanne Toren took over as narrator and it took me a little getting used to her. Now, after taking the break, she sounds just fine and I’m back into the series. Sarah Brandt, nurse and midwife, is in Chinatown delivering the baby of Cora and George Lee. Cora, an Irishwoman, is married to George, the Chinese “Paper Son” (son on paper for immigration purp This is book nine in the Gaslight Mystery Series by Victoria Thompson. I love this series but I had to take a huge break when after eight books, Suzanne Toren took over as narrator and it took me a little getting used to her. Now, after taking the break, she sounds just fine and I’m back into the series. Sarah Brandt, nurse and midwife, is in Chinatown delivering the baby of Cora and George Lee. Cora, an Irishwoman, is married to George, the Chinese “Paper Son” (son on paper for immigration purposes only), of Charlie Lee. Charlie Lee’s wife, Minnie, also Irish, is close with Cora and helping out while Cora gives birth. Suddenly Minnie’s fifteen-year-old daughter, Angel, bursts into the room in an emotional state announcing she will not enter into the marriage her father has arranged with an “old” man (of 40), Mr. Wong. Sarah is confused and learns a great deal about poor Irish women who marry Chinese to better their lives (and the ones in this story live very comfortably as opposed to the Irish families living in crowded appalling conditions in the neighborhood only several blocks away). This is a lot to take in for Sarah – immigration issues, arranged marriages, mixed-race couples and mixed-raced children and assorted racial tensions. Charlie Lee, small dry-cleaning magnate, wishes to secure Angel’s comfortable future by betrothing her to the wealthy Mr. Wong when she finishes High School. Mr. Wong is a different sort of tycoon with a diverse portfolio of businesses including opium dens. Sarah comes back the next day, to check on Cora and the baby, and finds the family in utter turmoil. Angel has run away, and they have turned every stone but cannot find her. The family is consumed by fear for the young Angel, and Sarah, of course, gets involved. Once Sarah is involved, murder soon follows. Next enters her unwitting and unrequited love-interest, Detective Frank Malloy. Once the young Angel is found murdered, the two almost immediately begin their alternate sparring and simpering. Frank frets over Sarah’s safety and Sarah promises (unfaithfully) NOT TO GET INVOLVED – they are just so darned cute. I can’t get enough of this series. There are the usual list of suspects and witnesses, some quirky and some less so, another murder and the promised attempt on Sarah’s life. The indigent, as usual, are portrayed in a very unflattering light. Also, as always, various historical events of the period are seamlessly woven into the story. This is not the best book that I have read so far in the Gaslight Mystery series. It was a little anticlimactic because I mistakenly read book ten out of sequence, so I already know who killed Sarah’s husband, Dr. Mike Brandt, four years earlier. Now that I am caught up, I look forward to watching Sarah’s and Frank’s relationship blossom (maybe?) as I move on to book eleven (in about four weeks when the library sends me my loan). If any of you Torontonians are reading this library book, please hustle and return ASAP so that Book Eleven drops onto my shelf sooner rather than later!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Leona

    This was my least favorite in the series. The story started out strong, but then it lost steam. Character development was lacking and the vivid descriptions of 19th century NYC (which I love) were missing. Not bad, but probably worth skipping over.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

    Murder in Chinatown 3 Stars Midwife Sarah Brandt finds herself embroiled in another murder when the young niece of her latest client goes missing and is later found dead. The case is made all the more difficult by the fact that the victim is of mixed Chinese-Irish parentage and the suspects from both ethnic groups abound. A good mystery with interesting historical background on the interracial marriages between the Chinese men and Irish women. The information on the restrictions places on Chinese Murder in Chinatown 3 Stars Midwife Sarah Brandt finds herself embroiled in another murder when the young niece of her latest client goes missing and is later found dead. The case is made all the more difficult by the fact that the victim is of mixed Chinese-Irish parentage and the suspects from both ethnic groups abound. A good mystery with interesting historical background on the interracial marriages between the Chinese men and Irish women. The information on the restrictions places on Chinese immigrants was eye opening. The range of suspects and motivations make the investigation particularly intriguing, and the eventual revelation of the culprit is satisfying. So why only 3 stars? Well, this is actually the first book in which Sarah's actions annoy me. She makes a certain request of Frank Malloy that is very disconcerting particularly in light of the crimes committed against women both in the past and to this day. Thankfully, the issues is resolved quite easily, but it still put a damper on my appreciation for the story. The romance between Frank and Sarah is progressing as they both appear to have accepted their feelings for one another even if they have yet to admit them out loud. The next book will focus on the murder of Sarah's husband and I am eager to find out who killed him and why.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    I needed something light and this fit the bill. Though the constant racism spouted by most of the supporting characters was tough to get through, as this latest case takes place in New York City’s Chinatown. What starts as a teen runaway situation becomes a murder investigation, which is complicated as no one Frank deals with in Chinatown wants to have anything to do with him. And the motives are complicated by familial and cultural expectations. Sarah becomes involved initially because she’s hel I needed something light and this fit the bill. Though the constant racism spouted by most of the supporting characters was tough to get through, as this latest case takes place in New York City’s Chinatown. What starts as a teen runaway situation becomes a murder investigation, which is complicated as no one Frank deals with in Chinatown wants to have anything to do with him. And the motives are complicated by familial and cultural expectations. Sarah becomes involved initially because she’s helping the Irish wife of a Chinese man give birth, and stays involved, much to Malloy’s annoyance. :) By the case’s end, we see how Sarah’s, Maeve’s and Catherine’s relationship is getting stronger, and it looks like Malloy may be getting closer to finally making progress on Dr Brandt’s cold case.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Helen

    I don't think Victoria Thompson intended to create reverse stereotypes, but I think that's almost what she did in this Gaslight Mystery. It's good to get away from the evil Chinese lurking in dark alleys, but the Chinese in this are all simple immigrants, with only one slightly tainted with criminality. The men are politely spoken, decent, hard-working, and kind. On the other side are the Irish women who are usually portrayed as hard working, religious young women grateful for every chance they' I don't think Victoria Thompson intended to create reverse stereotypes, but I think that's almost what she did in this Gaslight Mystery. It's good to get away from the evil Chinese lurking in dark alleys, but the Chinese in this are all simple immigrants, with only one slightly tainted with criminality. The men are politely spoken, decent, hard-working, and kind. On the other side are the Irish women who are usually portrayed as hard working, religious young women grateful for every chance they're offered and scrubbing their way to a better life. Here the Irish are disorganised, lazy and drunk (especially the men), dirty, and foul mouthed. Irish women genuinely wanting a decent life marry Chinese men and are gently cared for ever after. I don't accept either of those pictures as generally true, although there are doubtless many examples of both. The story was believable and so are the characters, mostly. I am not completely happy with people who defy the norms of their places and times, like Frank and Sarah, but it makes them easier to like when they are closer to our norms. MS Thompson tries to move Frank closer to ordinary police of his time by having him quick with his fists and feet when Sarah's not around, but I think he would have been rougher in real life. Interesting having Roosevelt there as the Commissioner of Police, so that you can see what the police were like by looking at the changes he was trying to bring in. So let's see: the police were corrupt and had to be "rewarded" to do their jobs, Tammany Hall showed how corrupt politicians could be, the majority of people were racially biased, and street violence was common. Certainly no good old days here. Even if the racial portraits are a little off kilter it is interesting to see things from a slightly different viewpoint.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Not totally sure how to feel about this one. There's a fair bit of racism, but I'm not 100% sure that it's all in the spirit of historical accuracy. It was a decent little mystery and I didn't have trouble following along despite the fact that it was the ninth in a series, but I can't say I'm eager to read the others. I picked this up somewhere, for free, mostly because it's set in New York City at the turn of the nineteenth century. You get a taste of tenements, the "mixed salad" of American im Not totally sure how to feel about this one. There's a fair bit of racism, but I'm not 100% sure that it's all in the spirit of historical accuracy. It was a decent little mystery and I didn't have trouble following along despite the fact that it was the ninth in a series, but I can't say I'm eager to read the others. I picked this up somewhere, for free, mostly because it's set in New York City at the turn of the nineteenth century. You get a taste of tenements, the "mixed salad" of American immigrants, ridiculously restrictive immigration laws, and the sleazy underbelly of the criminal justice system--or lack thereof. Unfortunately, it hits you over the head with these things repeatedly, and most of it is told rather than shown. American historical fiction at its most basic. The book didn't need to be half as long as it is if we didn't have to rehash every development in the case in real time. All that said, there were definitely interesting details to absorb. So yeah, it was okay, but it wasn't great.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Amanda McGill

    For full review - The Limit of Books Does Not Exist Murder in Chinatown is the 9th novel in the Gaslight mystery series and I love this series! I love reading about what adventures and murders Sarah gets herself involved with. Also I have never read anything about the turn of the century so I love the historical aspect. It’s interesting to make comparisons between today’s society and what society was like over 100 years ago. Sadly there are things that haven’t changed. In this novel, Sarah is open For full review - The Limit of Books Does Not Exist Murder in Chinatown is the 9th novel in the Gaslight mystery series and I love this series! I love reading about what adventures and murders Sarah gets herself involved with. Also I have never read anything about the turn of the century so I love the historical aspect. It’s interesting to make comparisons between today’s society and what society was like over 100 years ago. Sadly there are things that haven’t changed. In this novel, Sarah is open and honest about what the situation is like for the Chinese who have immigrated to the US. Only Chinese men are allowed to come over to work in the United States. They are treated as second class citizens even though in some situations they are making good money, even better than white immigrants. Because of the lack of Chinese women, Chinese men are marrying Irish women and having mixed babies. These children are not treated as Irish or Chinese since neither society will accept them as they are not fully 100% of a certain race. Thankfully we have Sarah. Even though she is well aware of the stereotypes, she ignores them and helps deliver babies regardless of what the situation is. In this novel, a Irish woman is giving birth and after the birth, an Irish-Chinese young woman goes missing and eventually is found dead. Obviously there is a lot of tension between the Irish and the Chinese, each pointing to the other as the murderer. I enjoyed the mystery more than previous novels since I didn’t guess who the killer was. Thompson did a great job throwing in a number of suspects who each had a reason for killing the young woman. If you haven’t heard of this series, I would highly recommend it!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christina T

    I typically love this series but this wasn't one of my favorite books in the series. It took me forever to read which is also an indication that I didn't enjoy it as much. The Good, The Bad, And The Stuff in the Middle: In this book, similar to Murder in Little Italy, the topic of racial prejudice was a major topic. As these are set in the late 1800's it wasn't a surprise but for me it was tiresome. People hated the Irish. People hated the Italians. And in this one, people hated the Chinese. Con I typically love this series but this wasn't one of my favorite books in the series. It took me forever to read which is also an indication that I didn't enjoy it as much. The Good, The Bad, And The Stuff in the Middle: In this book, similar to Murder in Little Italy, the topic of racial prejudice was a major topic. As these are set in the late 1800's it wasn't a surprise but for me it was tiresome. People hated the Irish. People hated the Italians. And in this one, people hated the Chinese. Considering every single person in New York in this book is either a foreigner or can easily trace their family tree to show their roots are also foreign....the hatred was almost too much for me. Thankfully Sarah does not fall into this way of thinking so her attitude was one of the only aspects that prevented me from chucking this book. When Thompson went out of her way to mention the Chinese way of talking was different and their "L's" came out as "R's" with an example....well folks...that was almost the chucking point. I couldn't help but start to mentally read the dialogue that way. Up until that point I was happily reading everything in my own voice. The mystery felt like it took too long to resolve (of course that was probably due to me taking forever to read this book) and Sarah and Frank's relationship did not progress even a little bit. This made me sad as I view the budding relationship between the two important in my enjoyment of the series. The solving of Sarah's husband's murder moved barely half an inch but now has a timeline where Frank only has a few weeks to find his killer. So the next few books might have closure on that underlying link. What did I like about this book? Agnes/Catherine and Maeve. I love those girls and they are just blooming under Sarah's guidance. I love the family unit she has created and the addition of the nosy but lovable elderly woman next door is even more of a plus. In a Nutshell: I'm hoping this was just a one off and the next book will be better for me because I am not ready to give it up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark Baker

    After a recent close call, midwife Sarah Brandt has vowed to stay away from solving crimes and getting involved in anything dangerous. However, she is in Chinatown with the Lee family since Cora Lee is about to give birth and gets a front row to the family drama unfolding. Cora’s niece, Angel, is upset that her father has arranged a marriage for her to an older man and runs away. The family is frantic to find her because the city is no place for a fifteen-year-old to be alone. While the family d After a recent close call, midwife Sarah Brandt has vowed to stay away from solving crimes and getting involved in anything dangerous. However, she is in Chinatown with the Lee family since Cora Lee is about to give birth and gets a front row to the family drama unfolding. Cora’s niece, Angel, is upset that her father has arranged a marriage for her to an older man and runs away. The family is frantic to find her because the city is no place for a fifteen-year-old to be alone. While the family does find her, she turns up dead a few days later. Sarah manages to get NYPD Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy involved in the case because she fears other police won’t care to fully investigate given who the victim was. But can Malloy figure it out? Will Sarah get involved despite her promise to stay away from murder? Once again, we are expertly transported back to 1890’s New York City. Along with our normal glimpses of life during the time period, we get to see a bit of how the Chinese were treated during the time; unfortunately, it isn’t pretty. However, the book never stops to preach at us, instead working this in during the mystery. The case itself is strong with plenty of twists to keep us entertained until the end. I thought I had a few things figured out, but I discovered I was wrong when I reached the logical ending. Sarah, in her efforts to stay out of the case, isn’t quite as involved as Frank, but she still has plenty to contribute. Both are great lead characters, and I enjoyed spending time with the regular supporting players as well as meeting the new characters introduced here. We get some advancement on a couple of on-going storylines, and it looks like one of them will be the main focus of the next in the series. I’m definitely looking forward to seeing where that leads. Read my full review at Carstairs Considers.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tammie

    Sarah Brandt has made her uneasy way to Chinatown to deliver a baby. There she meets a group of Irish women who, completely alone at Ellis Island, married Chinese men in the same predicament. But even as a new century dawns, New Yorkers still cling to their own kind, scorning children of mixed races. This was a big improvement over the last book in the series. I loved Murder in Chinatown but like most of the other books in this series I figured this one out early on. As I've said many times bef Sarah Brandt has made her uneasy way to Chinatown to deliver a baby. There she meets a group of Irish women who, completely alone at Ellis Island, married Chinese men in the same predicament. But even as a new century dawns, New Yorkers still cling to their own kind, scorning children of mixed races. This was a big improvement over the last book in the series. I loved Murder in Chinatown but like most of the other books in this series I figured this one out early on. As I've said many times before, I really think that Sarah and Malloy are written to be a bit too slow sometimes. It was pretty obvious who the killer was based on the fact that (view spoiler)[ there was unexplained blood on the person (hide spoiler)] . But neither of them questioned how it got there? Things like that keep me from giving these books 5 stars. I give most of them 4 stars based on how much I enjoy being immersed in the world and the characters. If I was just basing it on the mystery aspect I would probably give them 2 or 3. The developing relationship between the characters is what keeps me reading this series more than anything. The relationship between Sarah and Frank is moving at a snail’s pace, and I would usually be frustrated with how slow it’s moving, but for some reason in this series it hasn't bothered me yet. Review also posted at Writings of a Reader

  13. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    Four months after I started this absolute gem, I finally finished it. WHAT A BOOK! Okay so I thought I would be upset that Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt still haven’t thrown caution to the wind and give in to their love for each other. The truth is that I love watching their characters develop independently of each other. More importantly, it’s the waiting game that keeps bringing me to the next book. The mystery in this one is entirely unpredictable! I really thought I figured it out like six(ty) Four months after I started this absolute gem, I finally finished it. WHAT A BOOK! Okay so I thought I would be upset that Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt still haven’t thrown caution to the wind and give in to their love for each other. The truth is that I love watching their characters develop independently of each other. More importantly, it’s the waiting game that keeps bringing me to the next book. The mystery in this one is entirely unpredictable! I really thought I figured it out like six(ty) times. If you’re a fan of mystery, you’ll like this one. *trigger warning* The book accurately depicts racism in the 1890’s towards Chinese immigrants. I don’t think it came towards either of the main characters, but I was left wondering why Thompson chose to delve into somethings that weren’t necessary. I think she’s trying to set the scene as accurately as possible, but some of it did leave me feeling uncomfortable.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robin

    When Midwife Sarah Brandt delivered a baby in Chinatown, she encounters Irish women who have married Chinese men. This is during a time when Chinese women were not allowed to immigrate to the United States. Several of the men married Irish women who were also alone in the city. Sarah meets 15-year-old Angel Lee, a biracial teenager who doesn't want to marry the older Chinese man her father has chosen for her. The next day, Sarah learns that Angel has disappeared. She decides to ask Detective Ser When Midwife Sarah Brandt delivered a baby in Chinatown, she encounters Irish women who have married Chinese men. This is during a time when Chinese women were not allowed to immigrate to the United States. Several of the men married Irish women who were also alone in the city. Sarah meets 15-year-old Angel Lee, a biracial teenager who doesn't want to marry the older Chinese man her father has chosen for her. The next day, Sarah learns that Angel has disappeared. She decides to ask Detective Sergeant Frank Malloy for any ideas where the girl could be. When Angel's body is found in an alley, Malloy and Sarah find themselves drawn into the middle of another mystery. The 9th book in the Gaslight Mysteries series is another entertaining read. While Sarah and Malloy investigate the murder, we learn about the prejudices faced by the Chinese immigrants in New York City at that time. This mystery has several suspects. I latched onto one suspect for over half of the book, then realized who the actual villain was in the second half. My rating: 4.5 Stars.

  15. 5 out of 5

    The Book Report

    Everything was wrong with this installment of Gaslight Mysteries. Glad to be in the midst of a binge, having enjoyed nine mysteries and with another ten ahead. Had I waited a year - or, worse, picked this up as a stand-alone - the flimsy story and questionable dialogue would have been enough to squelch my adoration for the series. The narrator change for the audio book was downright heartbreaking. Characters were given painful, stereotypical 'central casting' accents, and our two main characters Everything was wrong with this installment of Gaslight Mysteries. Glad to be in the midst of a binge, having enjoyed nine mysteries and with another ten ahead. Had I waited a year - or, worse, picked this up as a stand-alone - the flimsy story and questionable dialogue would have been enough to squelch my adoration for the series. The narrator change for the audio book was downright heartbreaking. Characters were given painful, stereotypical 'central casting' accents, and our two main characters were trampled. The reading took all the joy and connection between our duo: Sarah's joyful "Malloy!" greeting was eliminated and the vocal choices for Frank were totally off-putting, turning him into a caricatured gruff and mean clod. The reading was so grating, I was pulled out of the book dozens of times. Fingers crossed that the original reader returns for the remainder of the series. The main historical facts of the book is fascinating. In all my New York research and tours of the LES, I had never heard of the prominence of Irish and Chinese marriages. More character development or exploration of that topic would have gone a long way. Content and plot was also disappointing: frustrating number of re-cap scenes; Sarah was sidelined for much of the story; minimal scenes with Frank and Sarah working together; questionable portrayal of complex racial friction in NYC; introduction of superfluous characters (will Sarah ever find a female friend?); and surprisingly sex-fueled contrivances (which is uncharacteristic for the series). The deeper conversations with Maeve were the highlight of the book and I look forward to learning more about her character. Perhaps in future books Sarah will re-connect further with her childhood friend who teaches English? Little landed for me, obviously. Yet, it is comforting to know that an author can have a dip in creativity and continue to enjoy a successful career. One bad episode does not ruin the series.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Another excellent story about the team of Sarah Brandt, midwife, and Frank Malloy, cop. This story is set in Chinatown in New York City. Many Irish immigrant women married Chinese men because most of the Chinese who came here were men, not women. The Irish women often preferred marrying the Chinese because it gave them a higher standard of living. All those Chinese laundries we see in movies were actually very lucrative businesses. Such marriages were win/win for both parties: the Chinese men te Another excellent story about the team of Sarah Brandt, midwife, and Frank Malloy, cop. This story is set in Chinatown in New York City. Many Irish immigrant women married Chinese men because most of the Chinese who came here were men, not women. The Irish women often preferred marrying the Chinese because it gave them a higher standard of living. All those Chinese laundries we see in movies were actually very lucrative businesses. Such marriages were win/win for both parties: the Chinese men tended to be good husbands, the women had stable living conditions, the men weren't deported because they were married. The downside was the rest of the Irish community pretty much disowned family members who married the Chinese, and the Chinese looked down on their own who married the Irish. But within the community of the Irish-Chinese families life was pretty good. When a 15 y.o. Chinese/Irish girl turns up murdered after running away because her father was going to marry her off to a very wealthy 40 y.o. Chinese man there is no shortage of suspects among both the Irish and Chinese. This was the first time I became aware of the alliance between the Irish and Chinese in the turn of the 19th century time. I'd like to learn more.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    I enjoyed this story as well even though I detected a mistake that her editor could have saved the author from! Very intrigued to read about the Chinese characters and their way of living in this time period! I figured out who did it some pages ahead of Sarah and Malloy but it was good all the same! I love Sarah and Malloy with each instalment more! Can't read the next instalment to figure out what happened with Tom Brandt and what is the truth about his character!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sherri

    This the 9th installment of the Gaslight Mystery series. Not my favorite so far... The story starts out well and then loses steam for me. It seems to ramble on and not as well character development. The location background of the story doesn't seem to play as much a part other than showing the racism of different ethnic groups in NYC. Points of interest were Katherine (aka Aggie) and Maeve's character development. This was the audio book version. COMPLETELY disappointed in the change of narrator. I This the 9th installment of the Gaslight Mystery series. Not my favorite so far... The story starts out well and then loses steam for me. It seems to ramble on and not as well character development. The location background of the story doesn't seem to play as much a part other than showing the racism of different ethnic groups in NYC. Points of interest were Katherine (aka Aggie) and Maeve's character development. This was the audio book version. COMPLETELY disappointed in the change of narrator. It was terribly awful. The female sub-characters sounded liked wining 10 year-olds, Malloy sounded like a Western gunslinger constantly drawing out his syllables and words, and Sarah sounded like she was constantly walking on egg shells. Awful change. If it weren't for following this series and not having a paperback at my disposal, I would've dumped this one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Talia

    The latest addition the Gaslight Mystery series, this book was enjoyable. I felt like the author balanced the murder plot and her character development quite well. It was nice to see more of Maeve and Catherine and follow how they have fared under Sarah's care. I think those two characters were an excellent addition to her world. I would like to see more development between Sarah and Frank. I realize, though, that in the timeline of the stories, they've only known each other for little more than The latest addition the Gaslight Mystery series, this book was enjoyable. I felt like the author balanced the murder plot and her character development quite well. It was nice to see more of Maeve and Catherine and follow how they have fared under Sarah's care. I think those two characters were an excellent addition to her world. I would like to see more development between Sarah and Frank. I realize, though, that in the timeline of the stories, they've only known each other for little more than a year, so I will have to be patient! I picked out the murderer a bit before the end, but with the clue she gave, it would've been hard not to! I recommend this book and this series. They're winners!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    This is the 9th book in the Gaslight Mystery series, set in turn-of-the-century New York. Sarah, a midwife, left her upper class life for one is more meaningful teams up with detective sergeant Frank Malloy (much to his dismay) in solving murders. This murder victim was a very young new bride, who was 1/2 Irish and 1/2 Chinese, and married a poor Irish lad instead of the older (30), Chinese man her father had chosen. Sarah is midwife to the young girls aunt, calls in Malloy to solve the crime, e This is the 9th book in the Gaslight Mystery series, set in turn-of-the-century New York. Sarah, a midwife, left her upper class life for one is more meaningful teams up with detective sergeant Frank Malloy (much to his dismay) in solving murders. This murder victim was a very young new bride, who was 1/2 Irish and 1/2 Chinese, and married a poor Irish lad instead of the older (30), Chinese man her father had chosen. Sarah is midwife to the young girls aunt, calls in Malloy to solve the crime, even as she promises him she will not get involved, they both know better. Malloy also continues to search for the murderer of Sarah's husband. Fast pace, great real like characters, and a look at the shady side of vintage New York.

  21. 4 out of 5

    CJ - It's only a Paper Moon

    Though Sarah has promised that she would stay out of detecting, she finds herself once again in a murder case, though I'd say she is more in the outer parameters versus smack dab in the middle. This is the first book in which Sarah takes more of a backseat and Frank is shown a bit more doing his job. Catherine has a nice little surprise for us by the end and Sarah and Frank's relationship is gradually moving but it is slow as molasses so it's frustrating me to no end.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Meera

    This one was slow to get my interest but half way through it started getting better. And I actually hadn’t figured out who did it before it was revealed and that was nice.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Kallenberger Marzola

    Once again, we travel down a murderous path with Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt in Murder in Chinatown, book nine in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series. Like the previous book, Murder in Little Italy, we hear about more injustices of the times. Sarah is called to deliver a baby in Chinatown. When she gets there, she finds that some Irish women marry Chinese men for, what they perceive is a better life. Chinese men treat their women with respect and offer them a good home and freedom that Once again, we travel down a murderous path with Frank Malloy and Sarah Brandt in Murder in Chinatown, book nine in Victoria Thompson’s Gaslight Mystery series. Like the previous book, Murder in Little Italy, we hear about more injustices of the times. Sarah is called to deliver a baby in Chinatown. When she gets there, she finds that some Irish women marry Chinese men for, what they perceive is a better life. Chinese men treat their women with respect and offer them a good home and freedom that they wouldn’t have with Irish men. They also must deal with the prejudice of inter-racial relationships. This case starts with a missing girl. Her mother knows Sarah as a midwife, and her work with the police. She calls her to help find her daughter because the police will not help. Instead of finding the girl alive, they find her body. Needless to say, Sarah turns to her friend Frank for help. New tidbit learned: I had no idea that Chinese women were not allowed to come to the US during this time. This series continues to teach a little history with its murders, family dynamics and romance. Love it. As soon as I get a chance to stop by the library, I will pick up the next couple books in this series. Nine books down and they still hold my attention from start to finish.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    I almost set this book aside. It was bumpy going for awhile, or it may just have been the mood I was in. I had trouble getting into the story. I guess that I like my mysteries to be about ordinary people in everyday locales, so when the author adds political intrigue, social justice or foreign customs to the story I find that I don't care so much. I have read the books leading up to Murder in Chinatown and some after but I didn't feel the deep involvement of Brandt or Malloy in this one. As Mr I almost set this book aside. It was bumpy going for awhile, or it may just have been the mood I was in. I had trouble getting into the story. I guess that I like my mysteries to be about ordinary people in everyday locales, so when the author adds political intrigue, social justice or foreign customs to the story I find that I don't care so much. I have read the books leading up to Murder in Chinatown and some after but I didn't feel the deep involvement of Brandt or Malloy in this one. As Mrs. Brandt took a step back and tried not to interfere or help with the investigation the story lost the vitality it had in others. I can sum up the story line: An Irish-Chinese girl runs away because her father arranged to have her marry "an old Chinese man". Soon after she is found, married to a poor Irish boy living in a tenement, she is dead. The Irish say that her father did it, her brother points at the Irish family, then James Wong, her jilted husband-to-be also has to be considered. The story focuses quite a bit on the poor dysfunctional Irish family because their whereabouts can never be documented, thus they are all suspect. With no real clues to go on Malloy finally starts interviewing possible witnesses to the murder in a house that looks down upon the murder scene. Of course it is the last apartment, top floor that he finds a witness, but she is old and can only describe the perpetrator as Chinese by the queue and clothing. Now the story gets a bit scrambled (read, annoying) because of false confessions and a surprise that Wong is shacking up with another young girl, his motive not fully explained (other than sex). When a second murder occurs Malloy has to turn to Brandt for her logical skills in weeding out possible killers from his list of suspects. Always too many suspects in these stories!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Another stellar setting in one of my new favorite series. I love how the author weaves history into her books. You can tell that she's done her research and truly cares about setting the scene correctly. She has a brilliant talent for showing, not telling. Sarah heads to Chinatown to deliver a baby, but when the new mother's half-Irish, half-Chinese niece disappears, Sarah knows just who to ask for help. Frank and Sarah have to discover what happened to the girl. One thing that really stood out Another stellar setting in one of my new favorite series. I love how the author weaves history into her books. You can tell that she's done her research and truly cares about setting the scene correctly. She has a brilliant talent for showing, not telling. Sarah heads to Chinatown to deliver a baby, but when the new mother's half-Irish, half-Chinese niece disappears, Sarah knows just who to ask for help. Frank and Sarah have to discover what happened to the girl. One thing that really stood out to me was the appalling poverty. It makes me ever so glad that I live in this time period and was born where I was. I appreciate the author teaching us about this time period and the different factions of New York City in the Gilded Age.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Betty Strohecker

    This was another great mystery in the Gaslight series. When Sarah finds out the young daughter of a client's relative has been murdered, she asks Malloy to find the killer and bring justice to this Chinese immigrant family. So this story takes the reader into New York's Chinatown and gives a glimpse into the life and culture of this community. One of the things I enjoy so much about this series is the chance to learn so much about the early ethnic groups who settled New York, trying to create a This was another great mystery in the Gaslight series. When Sarah finds out the young daughter of a client's relative has been murdered, she asks Malloy to find the killer and bring justice to this Chinese immigrant family. So this story takes the reader into New York's Chinatown and gives a glimpse into the life and culture of this community. One of the things I enjoy so much about this series is the chance to learn so much about the early ethnic groups who settled New York, trying to create a new life for themselves in America. This book brings together the Irish and Chinese communities. I was unaware of the fact that early immigration laws prohibited Chinese men from bringing their wives to the US. No Chinese women were allowed to immigrate, in the hopes that the men would eventually return to China. This led to a number of Chinese men marrying Irish women, who were hopeful of rising out of the poverty of their community. The mystery was a page turner, keeping me guessing until the last twenty pages. New developments moved the story forward in Frank and Sarah's relationship, as well as the homelife of each character.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lynne Tull

    Early on in the story I thought I had this mystery figured out. Then, of course, I was wrong. I didn't figure it out until Frank did. This story gave me a peek into Chinatown in turn-of-the-century New York City. That's all I'll say. Don't want to accidentally put in a 'spoiler'. I don't think Frank and Sarah will ever get together. Things of the heart moved slower in that era. Still Recommending.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anne - Books of My Heart

    I love this series but this one is a new narrator. I loved the narrator of the first 8 books and I am not used to this narrator but apparently she does the rest of the series. I really loved the first narrator. This mystery was more Frank and less Sarah. But I loved seeing Brian and Catherine in this one, and Maeve.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Even after nine books, I still love this series. This is the slowest romance I've ever read though.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Ellen

    Sarah delivers a baby in Chinatown. Then the ladies find out the friend's daughter has run away and they try finding her. They find her married to a young Irishman but the next day she is murdered. It is a race to find out who has done it.

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