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Dubbed by the World War II press as "The GI General" because of his close identification with his men, Omar Bradley rose to command the U. S. 12th Army Group in the European Campaign. By the spring of 1945, this group contained 1,300,000 men--the largest exclusively American field command in U.S. history. Mild mannered, General Bradley was a dedicated mentor, the creato Dubbed by the World War II press as "The GI General" because of his close identification with his men, Omar Bradley rose to command the U. S. 12th Army Group in the European Campaign. By the spring of 1945, this group contained 1,300,000 men--the largest exclusively American field command in U.S. history. Mild mannered, General Bradley was a dedicated mentor, the creator of the Officer Candidate School system, and a methodical tactician who served through World War II. Then, as a five-star general, he lifted the Veterans Administration from corruption and inefficiency to a model government agency, served as U.S. Army chief of staff, first chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and head of NATO. Alan Axelrod applies his signature insight and compelling prose to the life, strategy and legacy of the general who remains the model for all commanders today as the man who revolutionized the National Guard, shaped the US army’s focus on the individual soldier, and emphasized cooperation and coordination among the military services--a cornerstone of modern U.S. military doctrine.


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Dubbed by the World War II press as "The GI General" because of his close identification with his men, Omar Bradley rose to command the U. S. 12th Army Group in the European Campaign. By the spring of 1945, this group contained 1,300,000 men--the largest exclusively American field command in U.S. history. Mild mannered, General Bradley was a dedicated mentor, the creato Dubbed by the World War II press as "The GI General" because of his close identification with his men, Omar Bradley rose to command the U. S. 12th Army Group in the European Campaign. By the spring of 1945, this group contained 1,300,000 men--the largest exclusively American field command in U.S. history. Mild mannered, General Bradley was a dedicated mentor, the creator of the Officer Candidate School system, and a methodical tactician who served through World War II. Then, as a five-star general, he lifted the Veterans Administration from corruption and inefficiency to a model government agency, served as U.S. Army chief of staff, first chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and head of NATO. Alan Axelrod applies his signature insight and compelling prose to the life, strategy and legacy of the general who remains the model for all commanders today as the man who revolutionized the National Guard, shaped the US army’s focus on the individual soldier, and emphasized cooperation and coordination among the military services--a cornerstone of modern U.S. military doctrine.

30 review for Bradley: A Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    For all of the WWII movies and books that I've read, there has been relatively little about General Omar Bradley. So, I thought this would be a good chance to learn his story and how he effected the outcome of WWII. My expectations were that this would be a deep biography of Bradley; I was disappointed in this it was a relatively high-level story of his major accomplishments. My lesson, if you want a biography, read a biography. Still I can tell you that I did learn about about Bradley that I di For all of the WWII movies and books that I've read, there has been relatively little about General Omar Bradley. So, I thought this would be a good chance to learn his story and how he effected the outcome of WWII. My expectations were that this would be a deep biography of Bradley; I was disappointed in this it was a relatively high-level story of his major accomplishments. My lesson, if you want a biography, read a biography. Still I can tell you that I did learn about about Bradley that I did not know. This was a relatively short book and worth the time to gain the historical knowledge.

  2. 4 out of 5

    George

    Axelrod creates an excellent picture of a soldier's general. A leader passionate about his men. Knew that! War correspondent Ernie Pyle gave him that nickname. The book is a lot about his early life ,USMA '15 as well as middle life between WWI and WWII. Then, he finally gets a command and it's the middle of WWII. The book spins a lot of wheels around his commands and movement between confusing Army commands in WWII. For example, what's an Army Group? It's a group of Armies. i though that the US Axelrod creates an excellent picture of a soldier's general. A leader passionate about his men. Knew that! War correspondent Ernie Pyle gave him that nickname. The book is a lot about his early life ,USMA '15 as well as middle life between WWI and WWII. Then, he finally gets a command and it's the middle of WWII. The book spins a lot of wheels around his commands and movement between confusing Army commands in WWII. For example, what's an Army Group? It's a group of Armies. i though that the US Army is an Army? Not so. Anyway, confusing to us non Army folks. At the end, author spent very little time, a sentence or two about his post WWII time, as the VA chief, first NATO General and the first Chairman of the Joint Chiefs--two significant achievements glossed over. No words at all about his retirement. The book just ended.

  3. 4 out of 5

    David Shaffer

    Ok but not as good as A Soldier's Story or Jim DeFelice's bio on Bradley. Not for a more established reader on WW 2 or Bradley.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darrell

    Omar Bradley was the GI general. He was known for his relationship with the enlisted men. He was also key to the planning and command of D-Day. Although, MacArthur, Patton, Eisenhower and British Field Marshal Montgomery were better known, Bradley was instrumental in North Africa and Europe for the Allied victory. Axelrod gives a good view of the man behind the stars. He starts with his humble beginning, how Bradley almost didn't go to West Point and finally, his post WWII years. It is a good rea Omar Bradley was the GI general. He was known for his relationship with the enlisted men. He was also key to the planning and command of D-Day. Although, MacArthur, Patton, Eisenhower and British Field Marshal Montgomery were better known, Bradley was instrumental in North Africa and Europe for the Allied victory. Axelrod gives a good view of the man behind the stars. He starts with his humble beginning, how Bradley almost didn't go to West Point and finally, his post WWII years. It is a good read and recommended to all people interested in the military leadership during WWII.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Frank Thun

    Well, i am just a fan of George C. Marshall. Why? I admire his considerate, humble leadership style, his eye for persons, organizational abilities and job design. I attributed the same strength to Bradley - and this book proved me right. Guess i Need to read a book about Dwight D. Eisenhower next... What i really like about those american Generals - including Ulysses Grant - is that they rose by merit alone. There is always chance and opportunity involved, naturally, but the base is ability which Well, i am just a fan of George C. Marshall. Why? I admire his considerate, humble leadership style, his eye for persons, organizational abilities and job design. I attributed the same strength to Bradley - and this book proved me right. Guess i Need to read a book about Dwight D. Eisenhower next... What i really like about those american Generals - including Ulysses Grant - is that they rose by merit alone. There is always chance and opportunity involved, naturally, but the base is ability which took them from humble origins to being great leaders. Good, solid book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey Lavoie

    This book was well written and a very good summary of A General's Life, but that was all it accomplished. Now this in itself is a feat as Bradley's works (both of them including a Soldier's Story) are very lengthy and contain a lot of detail; however, the author only cites several sources. Furthermore, the author did very little extra-research and includes no rarer writings or library archives. Also, my own issue and critique of all previous Bradley biographies is that they end around 1951, but This book was well written and a very good summary of A General's Life, but that was all it accomplished. Now this in itself is a feat as Bradley's works (both of them including a Soldier's Story) are very lengthy and contain a lot of detail; however, the author only cites several sources. Furthermore, the author did very little extra-research and includes no rarer writings or library archives. Also, my own issue and critique of all previous Bradley biographies is that they end around 1951, but the General lived until 1981!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jim

    Perhaps Bradley is one of the most overlooked military figures in US history. This short bio does justice to the man who was called "the GI General." Unpretentious and certainly not as colorful as George S. Patton, yet "Brad" represented the characteristics of American military leadership: selflessness, humility, and adaptability with integrity and respect that reflected the democracy he served.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Zac

    Stereotypical military history too focused on what army went where and not on what Bradley was doing, thinking, and feeling. Could only loosely be described as biographical. Also not enough attention devoted to his role in the early Cold War.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Renee'

    Incredible man! I hope somewhere there are still people out there with this much honor and character! We were lucky to have him lead us when he did!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Good short audiobook about Omar Bradley. A lot of this information shows up in other books about other leaders, but this focuses on Bradley.

  11. 5 out of 5

    David

    Nice, short quick read on General Omar Bradley.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott Loughridge

    Great read. Just very quick read, a more in-depth book would be nice.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ralph

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Harris

  15. 5 out of 5

    David

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pablo Canziani

  17. 4 out of 5

    James H.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Toby Field

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ken

  20. 5 out of 5

    Leonard

  21. 4 out of 5

    Gregory Butera

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt Dicker

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mom aka Sam

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nick Lloyd

  25. 4 out of 5

    Greg Canellis

  26. 5 out of 5

    Howard Brooks

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bob

  28. 5 out of 5

    Steven P. Nowick

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    One of the less compelling entries in this series I think because he himself is a less compelling leader. Well worth reading, as are all the entries in this series that I have read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rich

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