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To a generation in full revolt against any form of authority, "Tune in, turn on, drop out" became a mantra, and its popularizer, Dr. Timothy Leary, a guru. A charismatic and brilliant psychologist, Leary became first intrigued and then obsessed by the effects of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s while teaching at Harvard, where he not only encouraged but instituted their expe To a generation in full revolt against any form of authority, "Tune in, turn on, drop out" became a mantra, and its popularizer, Dr. Timothy Leary, a guru. A charismatic and brilliant psychologist, Leary became first intrigued and then obsessed by the effects of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s while teaching at Harvard, where he not only encouraged but instituted their experimental use among students and faculty. What began as research into human consciousness turned into a mission to alter consciousness itself. Leary transformed himself from serious social scientist into counterculture shaman, embodying the idealism and the hedonism of an age of revolutionary change. Timothy Leary is the first major biography of one of the most controversial figures in postwar America.


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To a generation in full revolt against any form of authority, "Tune in, turn on, drop out" became a mantra, and its popularizer, Dr. Timothy Leary, a guru. A charismatic and brilliant psychologist, Leary became first intrigued and then obsessed by the effects of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s while teaching at Harvard, where he not only encouraged but instituted their expe To a generation in full revolt against any form of authority, "Tune in, turn on, drop out" became a mantra, and its popularizer, Dr. Timothy Leary, a guru. A charismatic and brilliant psychologist, Leary became first intrigued and then obsessed by the effects of psychedelic drugs in the 1960s while teaching at Harvard, where he not only encouraged but instituted their experimental use among students and faculty. What began as research into human consciousness turned into a mission to alter consciousness itself. Leary transformed himself from serious social scientist into counterculture shaman, embodying the idealism and the hedonism of an age of revolutionary change. Timothy Leary is the first major biography of one of the most controversial figures in postwar America.

30 review for Timothy Leary: A Biography

  1. 4 out of 5

    5 Track

    Author's negative bias presented as objectivity gets somewhat in the way of the information. And, his forst 40 years of life are pretty much dealt with in the first quarter of the book. I realize all the exciting stuff happened after that, but I want to know more about how he became who he was! I suspect psychological intuition is not one of Greenfield's strengths. (He did a good job on the Bill Graham book, but that was an oral bio and besides it was mostly Bill's book). The one place where the Author's negative bias presented as objectivity gets somewhat in the way of the information. And, his forst 40 years of life are pretty much dealt with in the first quarter of the book. I realize all the exciting stuff happened after that, but I want to know more about how he became who he was! I suspect psychological intuition is not one of Greenfield's strengths. (He did a good job on the Bill Graham book, but that was an oral bio and besides it was mostly Bill's book). The one place where the author seems sympathetic to his subject is during the periods of Leary's persecution & incarceration, however much he brought it on himself. Like Lenny Bruce or maybe W Reich, TL put himself somewhat inadvertently in the way of the industrial gov't machine & it ate him. So this was equally parts informative and frustrating... Only a good read if you're willing to pick through the cowshit to locate the psilocybic mushrooms.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Becky Loader

    I now know more about Tim Leary than I need to know.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erik Graff

    Tim Leary was on the fringes of my awareness during the sixties and beyond. I'd read his scientific papers in preparation for a report delivered in a high school public speaking class, but not much else. He, like Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, I saw as a jokester, not to be taken very seriously after he left Harvard. This biography, purportedly the first serious effort in that regard, confirms that initial impression. Leary does not come off at all well. Rather, his seems another story of an ordi Tim Leary was on the fringes of my awareness during the sixties and beyond. I'd read his scientific papers in preparation for a report delivered in a high school public speaking class, but not much else. He, like Abbie Hoffman and Jerry Rubin, I saw as a jokester, not to be taken very seriously after he left Harvard. This biography, purportedly the first serious effort in that regard, confirms that initial impression. Leary does not come off at all well. Rather, his seems another story of an ordinary middle class guy going off the rails--and not very amusingly--to pursue, as the bible puts it, the fleshpots of Babylon. Leary, if Greenfield is to be believed, was an opportunistic narcissist without a moral center, immersed in deceits which led to ultimate self-deceit. Leary was also a cultural icon, conncected in very many ways to the elites of the West. His depravity reflects theirs and vice versa. One thing lacking from this book is any concrete sense as to how so many could have gotten so inspired by psychedelics. Here, Aldous Huxley still serves.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    An engrossing account of a remarkable & often awful life, I found it repellent & fascinating. Leary was a sort of cult leader, and if he'd been from a different socio-economic group he could have been a Manson. His intense self-absorption brought him rewards but also in some ways destroyed his life. He's typical of a certain breed of American mid-century 'alpha' type. The type of person dramatic things happen around, but - for the most part - he survives & others close to him suffer. An engrossing account of a remarkable & often awful life, I found it repellent & fascinating. Leary was a sort of cult leader, and if he'd been from a different socio-economic group he could have been a Manson. His intense self-absorption brought him rewards but also in some ways destroyed his life. He's typical of a certain breed of American mid-century 'alpha' type. The type of person dramatic things happen around, but - for the most part - he survives & others close to him suffer.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Reilly

    Timothy Leary: An Experimental Life by Robert Greenfield (audiobook unabridged version). This was a long engrossing biography about the 60's LSD guru who helped bring psychedelics to the masses. Leary may be the most controversial figure to emerge from the hippie movement, Leary started as a serious Clinical Psychologist and Harvard Professor. Introduced to psychedelic drugs by a colleague Leary was interested in clinical studies on the subject. What started out as professional science slowly de Timothy Leary: An Experimental Life by Robert Greenfield (audiobook unabridged version). This was a long engrossing biography about the 60's LSD guru who helped bring psychedelics to the masses. Leary may be the most controversial figure to emerge from the hippie movement, Leary started as a serious Clinical Psychologist and Harvard Professor. Introduced to psychedelic drugs by a colleague Leary was interested in clinical studies on the subject. What started out as professional science slowly degraded into madness, debauchery, tragedy and pseudoscience especially when he shifted from Mescaline to the more hallucinogenic LSD. What ensued was drug busts, traveling adventures, suicides, prison breaks and alliances with revolutionary groups like the Weatherman and Black Panther Party. Rock groups idolized Leary, Lennon wrote "Come Together" and The Moody Blues wrote "Timothy Leary is Dead" for Leary, Jimi Hendrix wrote and performed for Leary's only musical album. Leary appeared to be a sociopath which was evident in his close relationships, he never showed interest in his own children even when his only daughter killed herself, he was constantly chasing a good time and did so at the cost of the people that surrounded him. I found him to be extremely flawed and brilliant at the same time. He definitely lead and interesting life.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    This was an absolutely fascinating book to listen to. It covers the sprawling history of this man's astonishing life in a lot of detail, and is therefore not just a book about a brilliant, multi-faceted, flawed human being, but a must-read for anyone interested in what really went down in the 1960s counter-culture. The colorful parade of characters who were major players in that time (and later on) is endless, and I read with great interest as famous writers, radicals, musicians, high society ty This was an absolutely fascinating book to listen to. It covers the sprawling history of this man's astonishing life in a lot of detail, and is therefore not just a book about a brilliant, multi-faceted, flawed human being, but a must-read for anyone interested in what really went down in the 1960s counter-culture. The colorful parade of characters who were major players in that time (and later on) is endless, and I read with great interest as famous writers, radicals, musicians, high society types, philosophers, great beauties, and leading scientists all made appearances, along with a good number of people who are not household names. The book is over-stuffed with juicy gossip, wit, outrageous personalities, politics, and jaw-dropping occurrences of many kinds. If the 1960s was a three-ring circus, then Leary, while not exactly its ringleader, was very much in the center ring. It is however, a little short on serious thought. Leary was a highly regarded psychologist who did some significant work. He clearly believed that psychedelic drugs had the power to revolutionized human consciousness in a positive way. And while he may have been a little too messianic in the way he went about things, enough so that the authorities made putting him behind bars a top priority, I would wager that he was a more thoughtful individual than the attention-seeking, celebrity-loving partyboy that Greenfield portrays him as. This biographer clearly did not think very highly of his subject, and one gets the impression that he comes at this from the perspective of a regular middle-class guy who (and he is not alone in this to be sure) takes a very dim view of prancing characters like Leary who thumb their noses at mainstream propriety. Greenfield does make a convincing case, based on what appears to be very extensive research, that Leary was a self-centered, lying showboat who had a highly negative impact on those close to him. But even a biographer who despises him cannot hide the fact that Leary was a charismatic and courageous leader who inspired many to try new ways of living, and who paid dearly for his outspokenness. He was a lousy dad and a guy who sold out his former comrades to get himself sprung from jail, it is hard to deny it. But it is impossible to deny that Leary affected the lives of millions - it was a negative effect in some cases for sure - and that his life was one of the wildest and most kaleidascopic lives probably anyone has ever had, and that it makes for great reading and listening (Lawlor does a solid job in the audio version I listened to, telling it pretty straight and broadcast news-like). So when is Oliver Stone going to do the movie version?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Lovins

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Very well written, filled with interesting details about Leary and the turbulent times in which he lived.Not all of it's pretty, of course.His personal life for example. His first wife (out of 5) killed herself with car exhaust after witnessing Leary and his mistress discuss a possible tryst. Leary's adult daughter accused him of sexually molesting her and her brother as children, was arrested for defecating in a laundromat washing machine, arrested again for shooting her boyfriend in the back o Very well written, filled with interesting details about Leary and the turbulent times in which he lived.Not all of it's pretty, of course.His personal life for example. His first wife (out of 5) killed herself with car exhaust after witnessing Leary and his mistress discuss a possible tryst. Leary's adult daughter accused him of sexually molesting her and her brother as children, was arrested for defecating in a laundromat washing machine, arrested again for shooting her boyfriend in the back of the head, and then, while in prison, hanged herself with a shoelace. When Leary began turning state's evidence against former associates in 1974, his son Jack declared at a press conference that his father "would inform on anybody he can to get out of jail and it would not surprise me if he would testify about my sister or myself if he could"(p. 507).Nevertheless, Leary's son from a later marriage recently wrote a letter to the New York Times Book Review criticizing Greenfield for writing "ultimately a false representation of a good man ... My 18 years of living with Leary as a son was ultimately a beautiful experience." Being "a good man" is obviously in the eye of the beholder. Leary certainly left behind a wide swath of destruction. After escaping prison and landing in Algeria in 1970, for example, Leary went on the record urging the Weather Underground and others to "escalate the violence, they should start hijacking planes, they should kidnap prominent sports figures and television and Hollywood people in order to free Bobby Seale and in order to free John Sinclair"(p. 415). Like him or not, reading about Leary's various adventures in academia, altered states of consciousness, communal living, and politics (he once ran for governor of California) is quite entertaining. Greenfield vividly reconstructs encounters with G. Gordon Liddy (the Watergate burglar who eventually became Leary's debating partner), Ram Dass, Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassidy, Aldous Huxley, Alfred Hofmann (inventor of LSD), Michael Hollingshead (who once drilled a hole in his own head and who introduced Leary to LSD), Jack Kerouac, Jerry Garcia, Ken Kesey, Eldridge Cleaver, and many other interesting characters.Definitely worth reading.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Todd Martin

    Timothy Leary was a psychologist, Harvard Professor and counter-cultural figure in the 1960s who gained fame through his promotion of psychedelic drugs as tools for the expansion of consciousness. After becoming embroiled in legal battles and serving prison time in the 70s, Leary became a lecturer and futurist in later life, becoming interested in human life extension, computers and space colonization. He died in 1996. I always thought of Leary as an interesting figure, and saw him speak back whe Timothy Leary was a psychologist, Harvard Professor and counter-cultural figure in the 1960s who gained fame through his promotion of psychedelic drugs as tools for the expansion of consciousness. After becoming embroiled in legal battles and serving prison time in the 70s, Leary became a lecturer and futurist in later life, becoming interested in human life extension, computers and space colonization. He died in 1996. I always thought of Leary as an interesting figure, and saw him speak back when I was in college in the early 90s during his stand-up philosopher / futurist phase (his talk got me interested in the writing of William Gibson at the time). He had a legacy connecting him to numerous cultural icons and had a flare for originality that resulted in several phrases that have made themselves into the collective lexicon (most notably “Turn on, tune in, drop out”). With that as a background, I have to say that Timothy Leary: A Biography portrayed him in a less than flattering light. Greenfield depicts Leary as irresponsible and unethical in both his professional life as an academic and as a popular figure. A hedonist with the personality of a cult leader and a flare for self-promotion, Leary (whose weight of opinion was based on his academic credentials) abandoned all objective integrity early on in his career in his enthusiasm for physical pleasure and personal aggrandizement. In his wake, he left arrests, broken marriages, child neglect (potentially abuse) and suicides. By setting himself up as a self-appointed leader of a movement and recklessly promoting illegal drug use, he also created a backlash that helped damage any hope for a rational national drug policy. With that said, I do think the book focused almost entirely on the negative aspects of Leary’s life and overlooked or minimized the positive aspects of his message. A search of YouTube will pull up some interesting interviews in which he discusses a variety of topics. Leary’s legacy will likely be mixed, at best, but he certainly led a wild life and Greenfield did a nice job turning it into an interesting, if negative, book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Clay

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A very thorough biography of a man that is often mythologized. I knew some about Leary, but not very much, and I am fascinated by people who describe themselves as prophetic. Furthermore, I am interested in American history in general and the Beat movement and counterculture that took place from the 50's to the 70's. All of those fascinations lead me to this book. In short, I was not disappointed. I learned much about Leary and the times when he was most popular. At the end of the book it seems li A very thorough biography of a man that is often mythologized. I knew some about Leary, but not very much, and I am fascinated by people who describe themselves as prophetic. Furthermore, I am interested in American history in general and the Beat movement and counterculture that took place from the 50's to the 70's. All of those fascinations lead me to this book. In short, I was not disappointed. I learned much about Leary and the times when he was most popular. At the end of the book it seems like his life was mostly about finding fame, and not about any particular message. He bounced around from ideal to ideal trying to constantly remain in the limelight. After all is said and done, he is kind of just a charismatic ass hole who may of had some decent ideas at first but never stayed sober long enough to examine his message critically. Here are just a few things that I learned about Leary that I did not know previously. 1. One of his early experiments with psilocybin involved giving it to prisoners in hopes of rehabilitating them. 2. That he escaped from prison and lived as a fugitive in Algeria for a while. 3. After his prison escape he became politically vocal (something he discouraged previously) and even encouraged militant revolt. 4. Spent time in prison a second time where he briefly was in a cell next door to Charles Manson. 5. He turned into a snitch for the FBI to shorten his prison stay. 6. When he finally got out of prison he was in the witness protection program for a while and lived in the Pecos Wilderness near Santa Fe, NM. 7. While in NM he sought a job and UNM and at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, but was unsuccessful. 8. Some of his ashes were shot into space when he died. (He was obsessed with space travel after he got out of prison for the second time) 9. Earlier in life he inspired the Beatles song Come Together during a conversation with John Lennon. 10. His "autobiography", Flashbacks, is filled with inaccuracies and outright fiction in some instances.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lee

    Interesting book on a very interesting figure. Timothy Leary is the kind of person who everyone who lived through the 60's thinks they know and everyone who didn't has heard of but doesn't bother knowing. This book tracks the amazing, disturbing and often times sad life of Timothy Leary and the role he played in making the 60's. The writing is nothing to write home about, but it is well-researched.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Josef

    Unflinching look at the text and sub-text of the real life human being known as Timothy Leary. Again, this bio pulls no punches and reveals what we all know by personal experience, but rarely attribute to the human beings paraded as "celebrities" to us via the many media channels perpetually surrounding our eyes and ears, that is, flawed, but real humanity. I personally enjoyed the parts dealing with the actual, scientific study and experimentation with the hallucinogenic, chemical properties of Unflinching look at the text and sub-text of the real life human being known as Timothy Leary. Again, this bio pulls no punches and reveals what we all know by personal experience, but rarely attribute to the human beings paraded as "celebrities" to us via the many media channels perpetually surrounding our eyes and ears, that is, flawed, but real humanity. I personally enjoyed the parts dealing with the actual, scientific study and experimentation with the hallucinogenic, chemical properties of Mushrooms and of course Ab Hoffman's wunderstuff, LSD25. The long, slogging, journey from deeply flawed curious inquirer after truth, to the feeble, broken Shaman, only able to hear the voices in his own mental echo-chamber is a stiff-drink to be sure, but in reality no tougher than what one would encounter if they read a bio on any one of us, which again leads me back to my first sentence. He was more than all the low-calorie, psychedelic esoterica,(ie. Gnosticism and ancient Pharmacopeia wrapped in 1960's counter-cultural nomenclature). He was a human being.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Roderick

    This was one of those books that I bought with no intention of reading immediately but did plan on reading eventually. I had just finished Tom Wolf's THE ELECTRIC KOOL-AID ACID TEST and was reading a bit of Hunter S. Thomson's work at the time that I bought this, so I was very interested in knowing more about Leary. My only concern would was whether or not this book would glorify Leary because I only wanted to know about Leary. Despite being a big fan of Thompson's (although I don't agree with h This was one of those books that I bought with no intention of reading immediately but did plan on reading eventually. I had just finished Tom Wolf's THE ELECTRIC KOOL-AID ACID TEST and was reading a bit of Hunter S. Thomson's work at the time that I bought this, so I was very interested in knowing more about Leary. My only concern would was whether or not this book would glorify Leary because I only wanted to know about Leary. Despite being a big fan of Thompson's (although I don't agree with him 100% either) I didn't want to read someone philosophize about the brilliance and this book didn't do that. It spoke volumes about who Leary was, the influence he had on a generation, and just portrayed him a very neutral light and let his actions and results of his behavior speak for themselves -which only subsequently lead to portraying him in a negative light. VERY GOOD BOOK! I highly recommend it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Having read many of Timothy Leary's books, as well as the "Flashbacks" auto-bio, I was initially excited to read this book. Unfortunately, it seems as if Greenfield (who supposedly met Leary in 1970) was under contract to write a hatchet job. Leary's faults and foibles, of which he did seem to have many, get highlighted and his achievements deliberately get undermined or given back-handed praise. I slogged through the whole book, but ultimately found it a bit depressing and tabloid-like. Don't get Having read many of Timothy Leary's books, as well as the "Flashbacks" auto-bio, I was initially excited to read this book. Unfortunately, it seems as if Greenfield (who supposedly met Leary in 1970) was under contract to write a hatchet job. Leary's faults and foibles, of which he did seem to have many, get highlighted and his achievements deliberately get undermined or given back-handed praise. I slogged through the whole book, but ultimately found it a bit depressing and tabloid-like. Don't get me wrong - I don't think a book praising Leary to the rafters would do the man justice either. It would be nice to have a balanced analysis of this often misunderstood and complex critter. If you're not familiar with Leary but would like to learn about him, I would suggest avoiding this bio and go for the John Higgs book ("I Have America Surrounded")instead.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Claude

    A must read for fools that idolise Timothy Leary without really knowing what kind of person he is. The start part of the book where they explain his family history is a bit boring. It's a fairly lukewarm read until you get up to the part where he is working at Harvard and experimenting with drugs actually. I found it to be a worthwhile read as it confirmed my suspicions that Tim Leary was a dick, (just like Che Guevara if you actually get to know the facts from his life). It is also interesting t A must read for fools that idolise Timothy Leary without really knowing what kind of person he is. The start part of the book where they explain his family history is a bit boring. It's a fairly lukewarm read until you get up to the part where he is working at Harvard and experimenting with drugs actually. I found it to be a worthwhile read as it confirmed my suspicions that Tim Leary was a dick, (just like Che Guevara if you actually get to know the facts from his life). It is also interesting to read because of the large number of celebrities that Tim met in his life. I am astounded at how so many celebrities that I thought were wise human beings seemed to like him. maybe he was utterly charming in person, so it made his flaws bearable. I suppose we all have flaws.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kalma Piponius

    Some have complained that this book concentrates too much on Leary's negative sides. I think biography should be critical on its object and if it's not its a dissapointment. Leary's life included probably so much content that even with this many pages it can't be contained there but only partly. For example his later theories, like 8-circuit conciousness -model, is not mentioned at all - maybe thought as too outrageous. It's obvious that his family life suffered from his hedonistic and messianic Some have complained that this book concentrates too much on Leary's negative sides. I think biography should be critical on its object and if it's not its a dissapointment. Leary's life included probably so much content that even with this many pages it can't be contained there but only partly. For example his later theories, like 8-circuit conciousness -model, is not mentioned at all - maybe thought as too outrageous. It's obvious that his family life suffered from his hedonistic and messianic life style. As it's also obvious that he was not unfallible. He wanted to be happy and positive and didn't think too much of everyday realities. All in all pretty good book, I think. If someone wants to know more about his theories, he/she should look for some place else.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book actually erred on the side of being too thorough. I don't want to know what people had for lunch or breakfast. I'm not using that as an idiom, specific meal contents are listed more than once. I didn't really know much about Timothy Leary beyond, "Turn on, tune in, drop out" and I learned an awful lot about how he could very possibly be the most selfish and self-absorbed person I've heard about in awhile. It was a little hard to keep going at points because of how unlikeable Leary is.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    I wish I could have met this guy. I knew about him and even read some of his books a few years ago. But this excellent biography introduced me to so much more. I will be picking up some of his books to read with a new perspective. He was dramatically wrong a lot, but at least he was trying with all he had. One of my favorite quotes before I read this bio. "Never trust a philosopher who hasn't been to jail." - TL

  18. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Great biography! Really engaging from beginning to end...Leary was a very charismatic person, someone you'd love to hang out with, but definitely a narcissist and a horrible father. I'm waiting for the movie...Tim Robbins as Leary??? Leary was everywhere...on stage at Altamont, in bed with Yoko and John, escaped prison with the help of the Weather Underground then ended up in Algeria with Eldridge Cleaver, in prison next to Manson. A fascinating read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    The American Conservative

    'This book alludes to Leary’s charisma, but it never demonstrates it. By the time it’s over, the average reader might be forgiven for asking why such a man ever attracted any followers in the first place. That’s a pretty big failure in a biography of a pop icon.' Read the full review, "The Acid Guru's Long, Strange Trip," on our website: http://www.theamericanconservative.co... 'This book alludes to Leary’s charisma, but it never demonstrates it. By the time it’s over, the average reader might be forgiven for asking why such a man ever attracted any followers in the first place. That’s a pretty big failure in a biography of a pop icon.' Read the full review, "The Acid Guru's Long, Strange Trip," on our website: http://www.theamericanconservative.co...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    I learned that Timothy Leary was kinda like Uma Thurman's uncle. Thurman's mother, the model Nena, was briefly married in 1964 to Leary after the two were introduced by Salvador Dalí; she married Thurman's father Robert Thurman, the first westerner to be ordained as a Tibetan buddist monk, in 1967.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    The author almost comes across as looking down upon his subject as an amoral deviant but it's a fascinating enough read. I'm motivated to do more reading on relevant characters and philosophies glossed over in this book in order to reach my own conclusions. Dude lived a hell of a life...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vince

    Doctor Tim was certainly an amusing 60's character. The author treads a fine line, not to lionize Leary, who was a mess and frequently wrong but not to be overly critical of the man and his work. Worth a read and for you trivia buffs out there I never knew his ex wife was Uma Thurman's mother.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tom Schulte

    I never realized how reckless and unhinged Leary was, but this is still a fascinating tale of rebel-pioneer asea in a changing world. His insights into the psychology of the incarcerated seem perceptive.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I couldn't finish this it was so god awful. I don't know whether it was just Leary's reprehensibility itself or the very dry but very slanted style of the writing, but I was both bored and horrified all at the same time. But, I'm done.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mark Katzman

    An astounding, wild ride of a life. Enjoy the interview I did with him way back in the last century. http://fusionanomaly.net/timothyleary... An astounding, wild ride of a life. Enjoy the interview I did with him way back in the last century. http://fusionanomaly.net/timothyleary...

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Listen to this as an audiobook he had a very interesting life. And a hard one but definitely lived up to its fullest

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tc

    only interesting in the fact that I recall a lot of the references

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shadesohd

    Timothy Leary is a total huckster--a very pathetic figure. However, the story of his life provides a unique perspective on many fascinating currents of 20th century American history.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lelia

    Sad story, sad man.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Captivating.

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