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The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt

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Facts and fictions are different truths. Minna Pratt stares at this message above her mother's typewriter every day and tries to understand it. But how can she, when her mind is already so full? She wishes her mother would ask her normal questions like "How was your day?" instead of "What is the quality of beauty?" She wishes her brother, McGrew, could catch a baseball. Sh Facts and fictions are different truths. Minna Pratt stares at this message above her mother's typewriter every day and tries to understand it. But how can she, when her mind is already so full? She wishes her mother would ask her normal questions like "How was your day?" instead of "What is the quality of beauty?" She wishes her brother, McGrew, could catch a baseball. She wishes she had a vibrato and could play Mozart on her cello the way he deserves to be played. Then she meets Lucas Ellerby. Minna thinks Lucas has the perfect life. His home runs smoothly and evenly. Dinner conversation is full of facts, and everyone always has matching socks to wear. So why is he so intrigued by her family? Minna doesn't know, but as her friendship with Lucas grows, she discovers some important truths about herself and her family. In Patricia MacLachlan's hope-filled coming-of-age story Minna learns to value her family because of their eccentricities, and to value herself because of her own.


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Facts and fictions are different truths. Minna Pratt stares at this message above her mother's typewriter every day and tries to understand it. But how can she, when her mind is already so full? She wishes her mother would ask her normal questions like "How was your day?" instead of "What is the quality of beauty?" She wishes her brother, McGrew, could catch a baseball. Sh Facts and fictions are different truths. Minna Pratt stares at this message above her mother's typewriter every day and tries to understand it. But how can she, when her mind is already so full? She wishes her mother would ask her normal questions like "How was your day?" instead of "What is the quality of beauty?" She wishes her brother, McGrew, could catch a baseball. She wishes she had a vibrato and could play Mozart on her cello the way he deserves to be played. Then she meets Lucas Ellerby. Minna thinks Lucas has the perfect life. His home runs smoothly and evenly. Dinner conversation is full of facts, and everyone always has matching socks to wear. So why is he so intrigued by her family? Minna doesn't know, but as her friendship with Lucas grows, she discovers some important truths about herself and her family. In Patricia MacLachlan's hope-filled coming-of-age story Minna learns to value her family because of their eccentricities, and to value herself because of her own.

30 review for The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deborah O'Carroll

    Re-read August 2019 Still love this book. It makes me smile. ^_^ Original Review I LOVE THIS STORY A TON AND I DON'T EVEN KNOW WHY. This one’s weird because it’s modern and I like it. It’s by the author of Sarah, Plain and Tall, and I randomly picked it up at a library sale because it looked interesting. I don’t know, there’s just this really neat feel to the story and it’s about a girl who plays cello and her mom’s a writer, and a boy who likes frogs and is from a rich family and… I don’t know that Re-read August 2019 Still love this book. It makes me smile. ^_^ Original Review I LOVE THIS STORY A TON AND I DON'T EVEN KNOW WHY. This one’s weird because it’s modern and I like it. It’s by the author of Sarah, Plain and Tall, and I randomly picked it up at a library sale because it looked interesting. I don’t know, there’s just this really neat feel to the story and it’s about a girl who plays cello and her mom’s a writer, and a boy who likes frogs and is from a rich family and… I don’t know that there’s much PLOT exactly, but I just love it so much. It’s the best. Like… I hardly like any straightforward contemporaries but this one is so perfect and I just LOVED it. <3 (I just wish Goodreads had my edition up… which it doesn’t. The cover on the one I have is so much more adorbz than the Goodreads cover.)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aldean

    This book was a test. The day after our first date my now-wife dropped by with this book, one of her absolute favorites, for me to read and discuss. I was so terrified of missing some key point she was trying to make that I read through it in one sitting and then wrote a two-page book report as evidence of my earnest intentions if nothing else. But I got it right, evidently, because she kept me around. A greatly charming little story of gaining confidence in who you are. I will continue to highly This book was a test. The day after our first date my now-wife dropped by with this book, one of her absolute favorites, for me to read and discuss. I was so terrified of missing some key point she was trying to make that I read through it in one sitting and then wrote a two-page book report as evidence of my earnest intentions if nothing else. But I got it right, evidently, because she kept me around. A greatly charming little story of gaining confidence in who you are. I will continue to highly recommend it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kricket

    i have never met any children who act as whimsical and adorably intelligent as patricia maclachlan's characters, but even with their poetic dialogue they're very real somehow. i'm not sure how she does it. minna is eleven, plays the cello, adores her younger brother mcgrew and wishes her novelist mother would ask her the right questions. when lucas ellerbee, violist, frog-lover, and cutie patootie, joins her chamber quartet, minna discovers something else she wants: a vibrato. (i think this is w i have never met any children who act as whimsical and adorably intelligent as patricia maclachlan's characters, but even with their poetic dialogue they're very real somehow. i'm not sure how she does it. minna is eleven, plays the cello, adores her younger brother mcgrew and wishes her novelist mother would ask her the right questions. when lucas ellerbee, violist, frog-lover, and cutie patootie, joins her chamber quartet, minna discovers something else she wants: a vibrato. (i think this is what sealed my love for this book as a 5th grader: i played viola and spent a ridiculous amount of time worrying about my lack of vibrato. leave it to maclachlan to uncover the deepest desires of orchestra nerds! in the book, vibratos just show up like, say, your first armpit hair. i hoped this would happen to me so i wouldn't have to do the horrible vibrato-building exercises assigned by my conductor.) as the title implies, the book is also about art as a version of the truth, or as picasso says in the opening quote, "a lie that makes us realize the truth." reading as a kid, this all went over my head, but it makes for continuing enjoyment of this tiny but pithy book as an adult.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Geizy

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt is about a young girl who is searching for her vibrato. During the whole book she goes through many struggles such as, her fingers can't reach the third string on her Cello, her parents dont pay as much attention to her as thier suppose too, and falling in love with the Violinist, Lucas. But at the end everything turns out to be perfec. Her parents went to the competion, she got her vibrato and her crush is now like her best friend. I can relate to Minna be The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt is about a young girl who is searching for her vibrato. During the whole book she goes through many struggles such as, her fingers can't reach the third string on her Cello, her parents dont pay as much attention to her as thier suppose too, and falling in love with the Violinist, Lucas. But at the end everything turns out to be perfec. Her parents went to the competion, she got her vibrato and her crush is now like her best friend. I can relate to Minna because as learned how to play the Clarinet, it took me some time to get used to the notes and fingers because I wasnt familiar to the Clarinet. But now I'am in Gold Band. Im not perfect at it but i cant deny that Im good at playing it. This book really inspired me to practice more and I also noticed that I really enjoy reading. I guess some book always have happy endings. I enjoyed reading this book and i encourage you to read it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dalton Fitzgerald

    This book has a very rare and difficult quality of perfection about it which renders it tricky to compare with other books of any kind. The rarified atmosphere it breathes reminds me strongly of the works of A. A. Milne, but the setting and authorial voice has (to my recollection) more of New England than Old. The plot is simple, the writing flawlessly economical; it draws the ear of the reader the way a Japanese painting draws the eye. Perhaps it is the sort of book Hemingway would have written This book has a very rare and difficult quality of perfection about it which renders it tricky to compare with other books of any kind. The rarified atmosphere it breathes reminds me strongly of the works of A. A. Milne, but the setting and authorial voice has (to my recollection) more of New England than Old. The plot is simple, the writing flawlessly economical; it draws the ear of the reader the way a Japanese painting draws the eye. Perhaps it is the sort of book Hemingway would have written, had he given up the life of a hard-drinking, two-fisted, machismo-crazed depressive in favor of that of a cheerful author of children's fiction. In any event, I cannot recommend it more highly.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Josiah

    "There is often...no room for perfection in an imperfect world." —Imelda, The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt, P. 86 If Patricia MacLachlan's name weren't printed on the cover of this book, I can't say that I'd have been likely to be able to identify her as the author just from the writing. I'm used to a slightly more rhythmic sensation to the words she chooses, the gentle waves of her lovely descriptions creating a quiet harmony even when they're describing just mundane, everyday things, or s "There is often...no room for perfection in an imperfect world." —Imelda, The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt, P. 86 If Patricia MacLachlan's name weren't printed on the cover of this book, I can't say that I'd have been likely to be able to identify her as the author just from the writing. I'm used to a slightly more rhythmic sensation to the words she chooses, the gentle waves of her lovely descriptions creating a quiet harmony even when they're describing just mundane, everyday things, or simple outdoors scenes that we could pass a hundred times without ever looking at with deeper insight. The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt has more of an urban feel to it, but Patricia MacLachlan's writing is no less nice for the different type of surroundings. As always, she manages to tell a story with utmost economy of words, putting a fair amount of plot into a relatively short junior novel. Minna Pratt comes from an eccentric family, a situation certainly not unfamiliar to the main characters in Patricia MacLachlan's stories. Her parents and younger brother, McGrew, all have artsy temperaments, and while Minna has her own fair share of endowment in that area, she approaches life from a much more serious and analytical point of view. Though Minna has been taking cello lessons for years, she's never really hit her groove with it, being surpassed by some of the other students as their "light" turns on and they really get what they're trying to do with their individual instruments. As she waits for her own moment of inspiration to arrive, a new student joins the class, a boy named Lucas who has played the viola for as long as Minna has been involved with the cello. The debut pupil quickly befriends Minna and provides her with a new take on her quirky family, as well as on her own much less spontaneous personality. Lucas actually wishes that he might have a family a little bit more like Minna's, and as they learn from each other about better understanding the families they were born into, Lucas also serves as the bridge between Minna and her cello epiphany that she's been awaiting for so long. I can't say that I'm totally sure what this book is meant to teach. The story is nice, though, and there are some memorable characters (especially McGrew, in my opinion) to add a smile or two along the way. I would give one and a half stars to The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    read this years ago, literally about 15 years ago, and it stayed on my mind...couldn't remember title for life of me, but "that vibrato book" would float onto the surface of my brain OFTEN. and then I found it, reread it, and see why. I'll go with luminous. something about the present-tense narration, or tiny details, or slow movement, or sense of waiting for something to happen. it sort of glows with all that. read this years ago, literally about 15 years ago, and it stayed on my mind...couldn't remember title for life of me, but "that vibrato book" would float onto the surface of my brain OFTEN. and then I found it, reread it, and see why. I'll go with luminous. something about the present-tense narration, or tiny details, or slow movement, or sense of waiting for something to happen. it sort of glows with all that.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    I first read this book in perhaps the third or fourth grade, and have read it possibly 10+ times since. From the very first time that I picked up The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt, I fell in love with it. The entire book just has a melodic quality that sucks you in. I cannot begin to understand what it is in particular that makes me love this book; it is just of such a quality that it stays with you for long after you've put it down. The characters in it are all unique, each with their own q I first read this book in perhaps the third or fourth grade, and have read it possibly 10+ times since. From the very first time that I picked up The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt, I fell in love with it. The entire book just has a melodic quality that sucks you in. I cannot begin to understand what it is in particular that makes me love this book; it is just of such a quality that it stays with you for long after you've put it down. The characters in it are all unique, each with their own quirks that make them thoroughly likeable: McGrew, who sings the headlines on the bus. Lucas, who keeps frogs. Emily Parmalee, who always wears pink feather earrings. Minna's mother, who writes and watches soap operas and, try though she might, isn't always helpful in Minna's search for truth. Minna's father, who sings opera. And of course, there is Minna herself, who is looking for truth and wants a vibrato. Each of them is richly painted, leaving you with the impression of knowing these people, being a part of their lives, yet somehow knowing that there may be depths to them yet to be seen, hiding beneath the surface. If you are searching for something profound in this book, you may not find it. If you are searching for truth, as Minna is, you may not find that either. If you are someone like me, you may just find that profundity and truth. Still, any way you look at it, what you will find is a wonderful story that gets under your skin and lives with you for a little while, the kind that makes a smile tug at the corners of your mouth with a recollection. You may just learn something as well. Did you know? Shiny teeth are highly valued in the beaver community.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ariel

    This was a perfectly lovely children's book about an 11 year old girl who longs for vibrato in her cello playing, has a crush on a boy, and doesn't feel understood by her parents. Minna felt very real to me, although the side characters were not very developed and I felt like her parents were gratuitously wacky. Overall, it was a very nice book. I appreciated that it didn't feel it needed to go into histrionics of poverty, death, or any other kind of trauma to be relevant. This is definitely a bo This was a perfectly lovely children's book about an 11 year old girl who longs for vibrato in her cello playing, has a crush on a boy, and doesn't feel understood by her parents. Minna felt very real to me, although the side characters were not very developed and I felt like her parents were gratuitously wacky. Overall, it was a very nice book. I appreciated that it didn't feel it needed to go into histrionics of poverty, death, or any other kind of trauma to be relevant. This is definitely a book I would get for an elementary school girl.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Ravlin

    Really good book although not usually my type of book it was very interesting

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ami

    This is one of my favorite children's books. Patricia MacLachlan's prose is poetry and Minna, herself, is simply lovely. This is one of my favorite children's books. Patricia MacLachlan's prose is poetry and Minna, herself, is simply lovely.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristin Boldon

    Read this aloud to my 12 and almost-10yo boys. We all loved it. So funny, sweet, and true. Plus frogs! Also, this line: "Shiny teeth are highly valued in the beaver community." Read this aloud to my 12 and almost-10yo boys. We all loved it. So funny, sweet, and true. Plus frogs! Also, this line: "Shiny teeth are highly valued in the beaver community."

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mimi 'Pans' Herondale

    Real rating: 3.5 stars This book was enjoyable, but not amazing.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mary (booksandpizza)

    I’m slowly making my way through my childhood favorites and re-reading all of them. This was nice but nothing spectacular.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah B

    To my surprise I found myself chuckling at parts of this story. I had not expected that at all as most of it is kind of serious. It's about a young girl who plays a string instrument and she's waiting for her vibrato to come to her. She thinks her family is odd and thinks her friend's family is better. But he likes her family better. I had to laugh at the basket of socks that day there for months, ignored, with no matchers in the basket at all. And at the many frogs watching Minna's mother type To my surprise I found myself chuckling at parts of this story. I had not expected that at all as most of it is kind of serious. It's about a young girl who plays a string instrument and she's waiting for her vibrato to come to her. She thinks her family is odd and thinks her friend's family is better. But he likes her family better. I had to laugh at the basket of socks that day there for months, ignored, with no matchers in the basket at all. And at the many frogs watching Minna's mother type her stories.. but this book really about how parents are caught up in their own things and ignore their children. And how the children reach out in different ways to try to communicate with them.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex Telander

    Minna Pratt lives in a very interesting world, where each day she lives it to the fullest. She is an improving cello player who has lessons every day and should be practicing every day – though she doesn’t. She is in search of her vibrato, as she prays to God and Mozart and anyone else she thinks who might be able to help her get it. The book is filled with interesting characters, like her brother McGrew who has a very entertaining personality, and then there’s Lucas, the handsome boy who seems Minna Pratt lives in a very interesting world, where each day she lives it to the fullest. She is an improving cello player who has lessons every day and should be practicing every day – though she doesn’t. She is in search of her vibrato, as she prays to God and Mozart and anyone else she thinks who might be able to help her get it. The book is filled with interesting characters, like her brother McGrew who has a very entertaining personality, and then there’s Lucas, the handsome boy who seems her age, joining their lessons to practice his viola. Lucas and Minna soon become goods friends that looks to develop into something else, while a competition is coming up in which they will be performing with their other classmates in a quartet to prove their abilities, as well as $100 cash prize for each of them. Minna grows more nervous as the book progresses, over her feelings for Lucas, how everyone else views her, the upcoming competition, and whether she will ever find her vibrato. Patricia Maclachlan has created a lasting book with a full host of complex, believable characters, written in an almost stream of consciousness style – akin to Virginia Woolf’s The Waves—where there is not a firm beginning, middle, and end, but a series of flitterings in and out of the mind of Minna Pratt on what she is thinking, how she is feeling, and whatever else is going on. The Facts and Fictions of Minna Pratt is a very different children’s book that all should read for its uniqueness. For more book reviews and exclusive author interviews, go to BookBanter.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Davida "Davi"

    I was thinking about this book today -- I really like this book because of the families in it. In the book, the girl is pre- or early adolescent and very embarrassed by her family, who loves her, and whom she loves. I remember being able to identify with the mom, who is creative and not neat and watches soap operas, and her mom and dad still kiss in public. So the girl, Minna, is trying to develop her cello skills and at her music lessons she meets a boy who is richer and whose family is more di I was thinking about this book today -- I really like this book because of the families in it. In the book, the girl is pre- or early adolescent and very embarrassed by her family, who loves her, and whom she loves. I remember being able to identify with the mom, who is creative and not neat and watches soap operas, and her mom and dad still kiss in public. So the girl, Minna, is trying to develop her cello skills and at her music lessons she meets a boy who is richer and whose family is more distant. And the story is about their friendship and their musical friends, including a man playing violin on the corner, and the bus driver, and Minna's brother. And I thought about how Minna and the boy friend (Lucas?) learn to relate to their own families and to each other. I really really like this book - it makes me feel good and happy and young and learning how to be grown-up at the same time. I would buy this book again, now.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Foster

    Grade Level: 6th to 8th This book follows 11 year old Minna Pratt. She is a musician that seems to not understand her family dynamic. In the story, she meets a boy named Lucas and falls in love. Throughout the story she struggles with how her family is and how Lucas's family is, making many comparisons. Overall, she learns that her family is just as normal. There are so humorous parts that keep the reader interested. I could see this book being used in conjunction with a music lesson. Learning the Grade Level: 6th to 8th This book follows 11 year old Minna Pratt. She is a musician that seems to not understand her family dynamic. In the story, she meets a boy named Lucas and falls in love. Throughout the story she struggles with how her family is and how Lucas's family is, making many comparisons. Overall, she learns that her family is just as normal. There are so humorous parts that keep the reader interested. I could see this book being used in conjunction with a music lesson. Learning the different notes, instruments, and composers. Also, this could be used as a "grass is greener" lesson allowing students to compare and contrast their families with others. In a way, this is also a coming of age story as the Minna prepares the decide what she wants to be as she grows up. There are many different lesson angles one could take with this book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    I liked this book in a lot of ways. It was fanciful, but down to earth. It was genuinely about a kid, but had a lot of stuff in it that would speak more to adults. It was also a difficult theme--the atmospheres parents create in their homes have a big influence on the lives of their kids, and unusual backgrounds can mean a lot of culture shock. I liked it. But I didn't love it. Something about it felt a little too weird---like Patricia MachLachlan was trying to do something and couldn't quite ma I liked this book in a lot of ways. It was fanciful, but down to earth. It was genuinely about a kid, but had a lot of stuff in it that would speak more to adults. It was also a difficult theme--the atmospheres parents create in their homes have a big influence on the lives of their kids, and unusual backgrounds can mean a lot of culture shock. I liked it. But I didn't love it. Something about it felt a little too weird---like Patricia MachLachlan was trying to do something and couldn't quite make it work. It was a great story and a good book, but it wasn't...quite...HER. Hard to explain what I mean, but that's how I felt reading it. Like she was trying to be another writer. But it's a good book. I recommend it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was one of my favorite books to re-read as a kid. The characters are so wonderfully quirky! I was thinking about it the other day, so i ordered a few copies for the classroom. I've never read anything else by MacLachlan, but I still wonder if she based the character of the novelist-mother on herself. The scene that stands out most in my memory is the one where Minna is standing in her front yard, surrounded by people kissing: her parents started, and then her brother and his friend Emily Pa This was one of my favorite books to re-read as a kid. The characters are so wonderfully quirky! I was thinking about it the other day, so i ordered a few copies for the classroom. I've never read anything else by MacLachlan, but I still wonder if she based the character of the novelist-mother on herself. The scene that stands out most in my memory is the one where Minna is standing in her front yard, surrounded by people kissing: her parents started, and then her brother and his friend Emily Parmalee started to wonder how the breathing works in a long kiss. They experimented, and it didn't work well. The book is filled with little curiosities and observations like that.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Isiree Pido

    I have read the book last couple of months or years ago but it still remains one of my favorites. Being the type of person that is >…< typically closet hopeless romantic, I rarely find it enjoyable reading these kinds of tales but this one stands out. Mainly because there is uncorrupted innocence and quirkiness of the characters. Especially the writer mom. unobstructive and unique plot that is suited for mainly the tweens who loves mozart or music for that matter and finding yourself somewhere :) I have read the book last couple of months or years ago but it still remains one of my favorites. Being the type of person that is >…< typically closet hopeless romantic, I rarely find it enjoyable reading these kinds of tales but this one stands out. Mainly because there is uncorrupted innocence and quirkiness of the characters. Especially the writer mom. unobstructive and unique plot that is suited for mainly the tweens who loves mozart or music for that matter and finding yourself somewhere :) actually im gonna read it tonight before i go to sleep. then ill revise this review. or maybe not

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aranruth

    An aspiring cellist, Minna Pratt wishes for nothing more than to develop her vibrato, especially with the arrival of new student Lucas. While she loves her family, Minna often feels that her distracted, writer mother and psychologist father do not understand or really listen to her. As she gets to know Lucas and his family, she develops a greater appreciation for her own. A coming of age story, full of memorable characters, this book would be good for young musicians with experiences they can r An aspiring cellist, Minna Pratt wishes for nothing more than to develop her vibrato, especially with the arrival of new student Lucas. While she loves her family, Minna often feels that her distracted, writer mother and psychologist father do not understand or really listen to her. As she gets to know Lucas and his family, she develops a greater appreciation for her own. A coming of age story, full of memorable characters, this book would be good for young musicians with experiences they can relate to. The amount of music terminology used may turn away readers with no music experience.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    Reading this book I felt like it was-in some way- describing my life. I got this book back in third grade and it's been sitting on my bookshelf- what a waste! this book was just so excellent,the music theme wasn't forced at all. The whole flow of the book felt natural. Really, I can't tell you how awesome it was, you have to read it. I love how it's a coming-of-age story but Music is all part of her growing older, and it was funny too! I think this is proof that, sometimes, the right book finds Reading this book I felt like it was-in some way- describing my life. I got this book back in third grade and it's been sitting on my bookshelf- what a waste! this book was just so excellent,the music theme wasn't forced at all. The whole flow of the book felt natural. Really, I can't tell you how awesome it was, you have to read it. I love how it's a coming-of-age story but Music is all part of her growing older, and it was funny too! I think this is proof that, sometimes, the right book finds you at the right time

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    Again, this is a book handed to me by my daughter, written by her favorite author, Patricia MacLachlan. The string players, the frogs, the different parents, and children, the description of facts and fictions. Lovely. I don't play strings but my children do, so I appreciated the understanding of these instruments this author has and I learned from her. I am consistently amazed and fascinated and even sometimes a little irritated by Patricia's ability to make me feel so deeply during her books, Again, this is a book handed to me by my daughter, written by her favorite author, Patricia MacLachlan. The string players, the frogs, the different parents, and children, the description of facts and fictions. Lovely. I don't play strings but my children do, so I appreciated the understanding of these instruments this author has and I learned from her. I am consistently amazed and fascinated and even sometimes a little irritated by Patricia's ability to make me feel so deeply during her books, but since the feelings end well, I can forgive her. :)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    I really liked this musical story. For impressionable youth and discerning adults, there is talk of; gargoyle (statues), reincarnation, love at age 11, fiction as a different truth, and fortune telling revealing a next relationship. These were bothersome to me coming from this author. However, knowing the difference between fact and fiction; right and wrong, truth and lies, I could enjoy the story. I also learned some interesting words like: rebarbative, bilious, detritus, sapient, cachinnate an I really liked this musical story. For impressionable youth and discerning adults, there is talk of; gargoyle (statues), reincarnation, love at age 11, fiction as a different truth, and fortune telling revealing a next relationship. These were bothersome to me coming from this author. However, knowing the difference between fact and fiction; right and wrong, truth and lies, I could enjoy the story. I also learned some interesting words like: rebarbative, bilious, detritus, sapient, cachinnate and bumbershoots.

  26. 4 out of 5

    MangoReads

    If you are a musician at heart and feel your struggles this is a connection.Minna thinks a her mom is very eccentric and is not normal and cannot ask Minna some normal and regular questions. When,she meets Lucas and is accepted for an opportunity at a completion she realizes to except her families eccentricities. Minna is a role model for many kids and I am sure you will somehow relate.This is my favorite book right now.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    What an incredibly cute book. One of my friends recommended it as one of her favorite books ever, and I can see why. The main character, Minna Pratt, is dynamic and interesting, with so many wonderful quirks. The book is so descriptive, I could see it unfolding before my eyes. It's a quick read, and good for a pick-me-up if you just need something uplifting. What an incredibly cute book. One of my friends recommended it as one of her favorite books ever, and I can see why. The main character, Minna Pratt, is dynamic and interesting, with so many wonderful quirks. The book is so descriptive, I could see it unfolding before my eyes. It's a quick read, and good for a pick-me-up if you just need something uplifting.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christy

    Minna wishes for many things. She wishes she understood the quote taped above her mother's typewriter: "Fact and fiction are different truths," She wishes her mother would stop writing long enough to really listen to her. She wishes her house were peaceful and orderly like her friend Lucas's. Most of all, she wishes she could find a vibrato on her cello and play Mozart the... Minna wishes for many things. She wishes she understood the quote taped above her mother's typewriter: "Fact and fiction are different truths," She wishes her mother would stop writing long enough to really listen to her. She wishes her house were peaceful and orderly like her friend Lucas's. Most of all, she wishes she could find a vibrato on her cello and play Mozart the...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sanjana Rajagopal

    I read this book as a 3rd or 4th grader but I'm reading it as a senior and finding that it is still one of my favorite books of all time because of the reflective, pretty prose. I also love how the author doesn't dumb down Minna's thoughts, because as a twelve year old, I was just as reflective as Minna. And hell yes, I ship Minna/Lucas. I read this book as a 3rd or 4th grader but I'm reading it as a senior and finding that it is still one of my favorite books of all time because of the reflective, pretty prose. I also love how the author doesn't dumb down Minna's thoughts, because as a twelve year old, I was just as reflective as Minna. And hell yes, I ship Minna/Lucas.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lizmary Marquez

    I think this book was funny. Why because in the story Minna does a funny movement . For example in the story Minna does a move that she almst fell . I also think this book is interesting , because they give every little detail so you can imagine the what is going on.I also liked this because its doesn't tell boring secenes , it tells you funny and interesting scenes I think this book was funny. Why because in the story Minna does a funny movement . For example in the story Minna does a move that she almst fell . I also think this book is interesting , because they give every little detail so you can imagine the what is going on.I also liked this because its doesn't tell boring secenes , it tells you funny and interesting scenes

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