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The Innovator's Cookbook: Essentials for Inventing What Is Next

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Language:Chinese.Paperback. Pub Date: 2011-10-1 Pages: 262 Publisher:. Penguin Essential reading-and progressive thinking-on thesubject of innovation. from the national bestsellingauthor Steven Johnson. an acknowledged bestselling leader on thesubject of innovation. gathers-for a foundational text on thesubject of innovation-essays. interviews. and cutting-edge insightsby Language:Chinese.Paperback. Pub Date: 2011-10-1 Pages: 262 Publisher:. Penguin Essential reading-and progressive thinking-on thesubject of innovation. from the national bestsellingauthor Steven Johnson. an acknowledged bestselling leader on thesubject of innovation. gathers-for a foundational text on thesubject of innovation-essays. interviews. and cutting-edge insightsby such exciting field leaders as Peter Drucker. Richard Florida. Eric Von Hippel. Dean Keith Simonton. Arthur Koestler. John SeelyBrown. and Marshall Berman. Johnson also provides new material fromMarisa Mayer of Google. Twitters Biz Stone and Jack Dorsey. andRay Ozzie. Microsofts former Chief Software Architect. Withadditional commentary by Johnson himself. this book reveals theinnovation found in a wide range of fields. including science. technology. energy. transportation. education. art . and sociology. m...


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Language:Chinese.Paperback. Pub Date: 2011-10-1 Pages: 262 Publisher:. Penguin Essential reading-and progressive thinking-on thesubject of innovation. from the national bestsellingauthor Steven Johnson. an acknowledged bestselling leader on thesubject of innovation. gathers-for a foundational text on thesubject of innovation-essays. interviews. and cutting-edge insightsby Language:Chinese.Paperback. Pub Date: 2011-10-1 Pages: 262 Publisher:. Penguin Essential reading-and progressive thinking-on thesubject of innovation. from the national bestsellingauthor Steven Johnson. an acknowledged bestselling leader on thesubject of innovation. gathers-for a foundational text on thesubject of innovation-essays. interviews. and cutting-edge insightsby such exciting field leaders as Peter Drucker. Richard Florida. Eric Von Hippel. Dean Keith Simonton. Arthur Koestler. John SeelyBrown. and Marshall Berman. Johnson also provides new material fromMarisa Mayer of Google. Twitters Biz Stone and Jack Dorsey. andRay Ozzie. Microsofts former Chief Software Architect. Withadditional commentary by Johnson himself. this book reveals theinnovation found in a wide range of fields. including science. technology. energy. transportation. education. art . and sociology. m...

30 review for The Innovator's Cookbook: Essentials for Inventing What Is Next

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ron McGhee

    I have a little secret. I love listen in the background when experts in a particular field discuss their trade. I relish hearing writers discuss plot construction, astronomers discussing theories of time and space, candidates talking about political economics, or doctors discussing new medical procedures. It was for this reason that I eagerly awaited reading, The Innovator’s Cookbook: Essentials for Inventing What Is Next. Steven Johnson presides as editor and contributor to an array of nine ess I have a little secret. I love listen in the background when experts in a particular field discuss their trade. I relish hearing writers discuss plot construction, astronomers discussing theories of time and space, candidates talking about political economics, or doctors discussing new medical procedures. It was for this reason that I eagerly awaited reading, The Innovator’s Cookbook: Essentials for Inventing What Is Next. Steven Johnson presides as editor and contributor to an array of nine essays and six interviews in his latest book reviewing the underlying principles of creativity and innovation as well as the changes in business models and societal responses that ensue. Generally speaking, the essays are presented in easily understood terms, thankfully avoiding unnecessary jargon beginning to creep into the lexicon of Innovation Theory. A high point in the book is the essay regarding customers as innovators by Stefan Thomke and Eric von Hippel. This chapter presents cutting-edge discussion about new approaches to incorporating customer feedback (often instantaneously) to develop custom products. This chapter is a must for any student currently enrolled in a BA or MBA program. A low point in the book is the essay by Jon Seely Brown and John Hagel III titled, Innovation Blowback. The authors seemed marveled by the successful business model of communist China and proffer the term ‘disruptive innovation’ in an apparent wink-and-a-nod to slave labor, copyright and patent theft, and unparalleled environmental poisoning. Possibly in the next edition, Steven Johnson might follow up with an essay titled, Moral Issues of Innovation. The crown jewels of the book are no doubt the interviews of innovators who have changed the course of progress in their respective fields. I have now read each of them twice so as imprint them into my personal patterns of thinking. If the book contained only them, it would still be worth the read. The Innovator’s Cookbook fulfilled very expectation of what should be found when the stone of creativity is overturned and the rich soil underneath examined in detail. It is the type of book you wished you had read in High School or at the latest, in undergraduate school – regardless of your major. Like me, if those early years have passed, then think about recommending this enlightening read to a youngster you wish to inspire to stretch their creative thought processes to the limit. Received through goodreads.com giveaways program. *Donated to Darton College, Albany Georgia upon completion*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Arjun

    While its not truly a Steven Johnson book, it has some interesting insights. Its a breakdown of creativity, and has short essay/chapters written by various creativity experts (Teresa Amabile, Clayton Christensen, Richard Florida, etc). I thought it served as a nice overview, and I recommend it to anyone who's looking for a short review of any of those authors. This lead me to Teresa Amabile's new book, The Progress Principle.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    44th book read in 2014. Number 356 out of 387 on my all time book list. Follow the link below to see my video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAkou... 44th book read in 2014. Number 356 out of 387 on my all time book list. Follow the link below to see my video review: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eAkou...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Basically, a collection of innovation-themed essays. All good stuff.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Joshy Mathew

    A good book to get the basics of innovative mind. The interviews are relevant.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bryce DeFigueiredo

    Interesting essays, but not one of the top books I'd recommend.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Correen

    Johnson has been working on this topic for several years. This book includes some new information and a reorganization of older writings.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Justin Fanelli

    Underrated, finishes strong

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ralph Danielle

    It was insightful. There were moments when I couldn't follow what the chapter was explaining but I still got a bit of notes that is useful.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Florin Pitea

    Quite interesting. Recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lee Penney

    This ‘cookbook’ gathers together a series of essays and interviews around the subject of innovation, from leaders in the field (so it says). It was another book that turned into a war of attrition, each chapter a battle on the road to finishing it. It did spark some thoughts, but largely I just found myself tuning out of sections, forcing me to go back and re-read them, sometimes multiple times. To call it a cookbook is a bit misleading, this isn’t a series of instructions about how to innovate or This ‘cookbook’ gathers together a series of essays and interviews around the subject of innovation, from leaders in the field (so it says). It was another book that turned into a war of attrition, each chapter a battle on the road to finishing it. It did spark some thoughts, but largely I just found myself tuning out of sections, forcing me to go back and re-read them, sometimes multiple times. To call it a cookbook is a bit misleading, this isn’t a series of instructions about how to innovate or improve innovation, but rather a collection of unrelated essays that happen to share a theme. The dry writing was generally unengaging and uninspiring, with little to back up the assertions being made. If that wasn’t enough, this is really aimed at corporate leaders who want to try and create an environment of innovation within their company. It has very little aimed a personal level. It’s all about what you should do to encourage others, not what I can do to innovate. The one area where it saves itself is the interviews with actual people, although some of those seem so high up the chain as to be talking big ideas rather than personal processes. If you’re having trouble sleeping, maybe give it a go, if you want to learn more about innovation, steer clear, because the most innovative part is the cover.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    Highly uneven as one would expect from a pretty random set of essays and interviews. The field of innovation is, almost tautologically, rapidly changing. It is difficult if not impossible to create a timeless recipe for creativity. Many parts of the book were dated by the time it was published, and that was not too long ago. The best essays are by the big idea people like Brand, Drucker and Noveck. Yet it is the small idea people who make incremental changes on a daily basis who are perhaps the Highly uneven as one would expect from a pretty random set of essays and interviews. The field of innovation is, almost tautologically, rapidly changing. It is difficult if not impossible to create a timeless recipe for creativity. Many parts of the book were dated by the time it was published, and that was not too long ago. The best essays are by the big idea people like Brand, Drucker and Noveck. Yet it is the small idea people who make incremental changes on a daily basis who are perhaps the most effective innovators. There is a paradox in the way that innovators find it difficult to describe what makes a successful creative process. I wouldn't say that the book was a complete waste of time, but I found it lacking in the way that so many business self-help books are these days.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris Salzman

    Not what I expected. I read it because of a video showing how they did the shoot for the cover and it hooked me. The book itself though...it's a collection of essays that I think are geared towards people who are on the fence about whether or not innovation is a worthwhile thing. Some practical advice on how to create space for innovation to flourish, but for the most part it's a lot of stuff I feel like I already knew--or at least assumed.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mark Pare

    Ok, this was pretty simple imho. 1. Innovation needs talented passionate people collaborating freely. 2. Innovation needs funding at critical junctures. 3. Innovators need freedom and a platform to display. 4. Large companies/governments/organizations are poor at innovation due to bureaucracy. Not a bad read, with some good essays. Not a book looking for instruction.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    I didn't find this to be much of a cookbook. Not enough ideas on how to innovate. I also found that the various articles that make up the chapters of this book are from several different time periods, which made sections of the book outdated. Far better to read The Innovator's Dilemma, which really outlines the problems that most success businesses run into.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vernon Smith

    I agree with the other reviewers that this is simply an edited collection of other works, some of them quite old. What I really was looking for was more commentary from the author. I think it could have been so much more as a true recipe book with a formula for success. Still, well worth the read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kellyann

    Most of the essays were focused on business and innovation as it relates to products, so I found my attention wavering as I tried to make useful connections to my own work in my mind. A few essays were spot on appropriate, though, and after reading with my morning tea before work, I found myself referring during the day to what i had read that morning several times.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    Hodgepodge of essays vaguely held together by the word "innovation." Not up to Johnson's usual standards. I learned a bit from a few of the essays, and didn't mind any of it, but was fairly disappointed.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    This is a collection of essays edited by Steven Johnson. While I enjoyed and profited from some of the articles (esp. the essay by Teresa Amabile), I found some of the other essays uninteresting or too business specific to be of interest to me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    Picked this up thinking it was referring to experimenting in the kitchen, but just kept reading b/c it was easy to read and interesting! Several short perspectives on thinking or managing or encouraging innovation.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trever

    I thought the stories could have been better. Overall disappointed with what the book could have been.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Krystyna

    Won 9/1/11!

  23. 5 out of 5

    John

    A mix of interviews and guest essays on how to be innovative. Several pieces were dedicated to IDEO, whose books I find more helpful. Still a nice resource of short pieces on how to be innovative.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ig-88

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  25. 5 out of 5

    Carmen

    Won this book on Goodreads. Was too boring to complete.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Allisonperkel

    very hit and miss collection of essays and interviews. Overall nothing new under the sun (and can we stop referencing Dr. Florida's work?)

  27. 5 out of 5

    David

    Essays about Innovation. Interesting perspectives. Calling it a 'cookbook' is a bit misleading - expected it to be more methodological.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dharshan Kandiah

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emile Kordahi

  30. 5 out of 5

    Middlethought

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