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Music and Memory: An Introduction

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This far-ranging book shows how human memory influences the organization of music. The book is divided into two parts. The first part presents basic ideas about memory and perception from cognitive psychology and, to some extent, cognitive linguistics. Topics include auditory processing, perception, and recognition. The second part describes in detail how the concepts from This far-ranging book shows how human memory influences the organization of music. The book is divided into two parts. The first part presents basic ideas about memory and perception from cognitive psychology and, to some extent, cognitive linguistics. Topics include auditory processing, perception, and recognition. The second part describes in detail how the concepts from the first part are exemplified in music. The presentation is based on three levels of musical experience: event fusion (the formation of single musical events from acoustical vibrations in the air, on a time scale too small to exhibit rhythm), melody and rhythm, and form. The focus in the latter is on the psychological conditions necessary for making large-scale--that is, formal--boundaries clear in music rather than on traditional musical forms. The book also discusses the idea that much of the language used to describe musical structures and processes is metaphorical. It encourages readers to consider the possibility that the process of musical composition can be a metaphorical transformation of their own experience into sound. The book also touches on unresolved debates about psychological musical universals, information theory, and the operation of neurons. It requires no formal musical training and contains a glossary and an appendix of listening examples.


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This far-ranging book shows how human memory influences the organization of music. The book is divided into two parts. The first part presents basic ideas about memory and perception from cognitive psychology and, to some extent, cognitive linguistics. Topics include auditory processing, perception, and recognition. The second part describes in detail how the concepts from This far-ranging book shows how human memory influences the organization of music. The book is divided into two parts. The first part presents basic ideas about memory and perception from cognitive psychology and, to some extent, cognitive linguistics. Topics include auditory processing, perception, and recognition. The second part describes in detail how the concepts from the first part are exemplified in music. The presentation is based on three levels of musical experience: event fusion (the formation of single musical events from acoustical vibrations in the air, on a time scale too small to exhibit rhythm), melody and rhythm, and form. The focus in the latter is on the psychological conditions necessary for making large-scale--that is, formal--boundaries clear in music rather than on traditional musical forms. The book also discusses the idea that much of the language used to describe musical structures and processes is metaphorical. It encourages readers to consider the possibility that the process of musical composition can be a metaphorical transformation of their own experience into sound. The book also touches on unresolved debates about psychological musical universals, information theory, and the operation of neurons. It requires no formal musical training and contains a glossary and an appendix of listening examples.

47 review for Music and Memory: An Introduction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Thompson

    Worth keeping and reading again in a few years.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    This is the best book on music theory I've ever read because it doesn't make unfounded claims about how music should work. In fact there is almost no written music examples in the book. Rather it takes us through how we listen to and experience music much like we do with general sounds or language. We categorize phrases and group into "chunks" using short, mid and long term memory. I only wish I had the memory to retain some of the many points of the book. This is the best book on music theory I've ever read because it doesn't make unfounded claims about how music should work. In fact there is almost no written music examples in the book. Rather it takes us through how we listen to and experience music much like we do with general sounds or language. We categorize phrases and group into "chunks" using short, mid and long term memory. I only wish I had the memory to retain some of the many points of the book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ethan

    An information-theoretical approach to music, the best account I've seen so far of how it all works. See my own writing on the subject. An information-theoretical approach to music, the best account I've seen so far of how it all works. See my own writing on the subject.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Connor

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marta Hagen

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brian Boyle

  7. 5 out of 5

    jules

  8. 4 out of 5

    Aimee Rydarowski

  9. 5 out of 5

    John Ellis

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simon's Cat Cat

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sofia

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Rdr

  15. 5 out of 5

    Laura Erel

  16. 4 out of 5

    Igor

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tori

  18. 5 out of 5

    Weronika

  19. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Whittaker-Mahoney

  20. 4 out of 5

    Imri Talgam

  21. 5 out of 5

    Connie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Anna

  23. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

  24. 4 out of 5

    Onsetsu Evan Cordes

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richard Edward Horner

  27. 5 out of 5

    Joel

  28. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ella

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ilya

  31. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

  32. 5 out of 5

    Garret

  33. 5 out of 5

    Crystal

  34. 5 out of 5

    Elie

  35. 4 out of 5

    Persephone Satorī

  36. 5 out of 5

    Marie

  37. 4 out of 5

    Gretchen

  38. 4 out of 5

    Aida

  39. 5 out of 5

    oenggun

  40. 5 out of 5

    Karina

  41. 5 out of 5

    Aine

  42. 5 out of 5

    Dillon

  43. 5 out of 5

    C.G. Wallace

  44. 4 out of 5

    Apparently Plant

  45. 5 out of 5

    James Tauber

  46. 5 out of 5

    Anna Pauri

  47. 4 out of 5

    K

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