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Originally released via AK Press/ Allied; re-issued December 1999 by AT. A refutation of the fantasies marketed as the "American Dream." The gulf between reality and a "free market" where entrepeneurs can compete on a level playing field is growing daily. There is endless talk about the free market and its virtues. Entrepreneurs compete on level playing fields and the publi Originally released via AK Press/ Allied; re-issued December 1999 by AT. A refutation of the fantasies marketed as the "American Dream." The gulf between reality and a "free market" where entrepeneurs can compete on a level playing field is growing daily. There is endless talk about the free market and its virtues. Entrepreneurs compete on level playing fields and the public benefits. The chasm between such fantasies and reality is acute and growing wider. Mega-mergers and monopolies are limiting competition. Fewer than 10 corporations control most of the global media. The existing free market depends heavily on taxpayer subsidies and bailouts. Corporate welfare far exceeds that which goes to the poor. Economic policy is based on the dictum: take from the needy, and give to the greedy. The captains of industry of today make the robber barons of the 19th century look like underachievers. The gap between CEO and worker salaries has never been sharper. One union leader put it this way: "Workers are getting the absolute crap kicked out of them." This lecture focuses on these and other issues and Chomsky's compelling argument to change the power structure of America. His analysis is clear, concise, and thought provoking, and his advice is simultaneously pragmatic and radical. This CD was originally released by Allied records. It has been out of print for some time and since Allied have decided to close their operation, we have decided to keep it available to the growing amount of Noam Chomsky fans. This is a co-release with AK Press.


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Originally released via AK Press/ Allied; re-issued December 1999 by AT. A refutation of the fantasies marketed as the "American Dream." The gulf between reality and a "free market" where entrepeneurs can compete on a level playing field is growing daily. There is endless talk about the free market and its virtues. Entrepreneurs compete on level playing fields and the publi Originally released via AK Press/ Allied; re-issued December 1999 by AT. A refutation of the fantasies marketed as the "American Dream." The gulf between reality and a "free market" where entrepeneurs can compete on a level playing field is growing daily. There is endless talk about the free market and its virtues. Entrepreneurs compete on level playing fields and the public benefits. The chasm between such fantasies and reality is acute and growing wider. Mega-mergers and monopolies are limiting competition. Fewer than 10 corporations control most of the global media. The existing free market depends heavily on taxpayer subsidies and bailouts. Corporate welfare far exceeds that which goes to the poor. Economic policy is based on the dictum: take from the needy, and give to the greedy. The captains of industry of today make the robber barons of the 19th century look like underachievers. The gap between CEO and worker salaries has never been sharper. One union leader put it this way: "Workers are getting the absolute crap kicked out of them." This lecture focuses on these and other issues and Chomsky's compelling argument to change the power structure of America. His analysis is clear, concise, and thought provoking, and his advice is simultaneously pragmatic and radical. This CD was originally released by Allied records. It has been out of print for some time and since Allied have decided to close their operation, we have decided to keep it available to the growing amount of Noam Chomsky fans. This is a co-release with AK Press.

30 review for Free Market Fantasies: Capitalism in the Real World

  1. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    "Talk about corporate greed is nonsense. Corporations are greedy by their nature. . . . It's like taking a totalitarian state and saying, "Be less brutal." Well, yeah, maybe you can get a totalitarian state to be less brutal, but that's not the point. The point is not to get a tyranny to get less brutal, but to get rid of it." "Talk about corporate greed is nonsense. Corporations are greedy by their nature. . . . It's like taking a totalitarian state and saying, "Be less brutal." Well, yeah, maybe you can get a totalitarian state to be less brutal, but that's not the point. The point is not to get a tyranny to get less brutal, but to get rid of it."

  2. 5 out of 5

    pod_twit

    Chomsky gave this lecture at Harvard in 1996. Much has changed since then, but listening to this would have you think otherwise. While his examples have been outdated, his criticism remains prescient. Especially those around tax-cuts and federal rebates being primarily business-serving (tax policies of New York in the Giuliani-Bloomberg era). Deconstructing 'reform', 'subsidy', and 'economic miracle' with his dry humour Chomsky cogently argues that free market theory, as it exists, is a self-ser Chomsky gave this lecture at Harvard in 1996. Much has changed since then, but listening to this would have you think otherwise. While his examples have been outdated, his criticism remains prescient. Especially those around tax-cuts and federal rebates being primarily business-serving (tax policies of New York in the Giuliani-Bloomberg era). Deconstructing 'reform', 'subsidy', and 'economic miracle' with his dry humour Chomsky cogently argues that free market theory, as it exists, is a self-serving mechanism which makes rich richer and the poor poorer.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gregg

    Even though this lecture was delivered in 1996 or 1997, in a world that doesn’t even look recognizable any more, the message and analysis is still invaluable. Chomsky differentiates between the free market mentality that the Reaganites, Thatcherites and Beltway discuss, and the one actually implemented. In the fantasies cooked up by the “fiscal conservatives” and their ilk, subsidies to the Pentagon must be called “defense spending,” and “stealing from the public to pay for securitization of pri Even though this lecture was delivered in 1996 or 1997, in a world that doesn’t even look recognizable any more, the message and analysis is still invaluable. Chomsky differentiates between the free market mentality that the Reaganites, Thatcherites and Beltway discuss, and the one actually implemented. In the fantasies cooked up by the “fiscal conservatives” and their ilk, subsidies to the Pentagon must be called “defense spending,” and “stealing from the public to pay for securitization of private capital” is called “reducing subidies” or “reform” or other such terms. He highlights the growing prison population under Clinton (which would explode further into the 21st century), the lies told about public spending and the redefinition of terms when it came to emergency spending, “tough love” fiscal responsibility and regressive taxes. My favorite example was and remains how Massachusetts Governor William Weld went to Congress to ask for federal funds to find a Jason Vorhees-type fish that was apparently wreaking havoc in Georges Bank instead of admitting that, due to deregulation and commercialization of the fishing industry, the area was getting overfished. “That’s how to be a libertarian with a religious zeal for the free market,” Chomsky cracked at the time. I wish I could hear him comment on Weld as Gary Johnson’s 2016 running mate. I really do. Some things have changed since then. The marginalization of the “superfluous population” in our prisons and in the phony drug wars has been given its due attention, most notably by writers like Michelle Alexander and films like 13th. “Economic miracles’ and “reduction of subsidies” get some of the scorn they’re deserved, particularly since the Great Recession (though not nearly enough). And although entities like the Wall Street Journal and Chicago Tribune still have too many pieces in their archives deifying companies like Boeing and Raytheon as free market heroes, they’re starting to get more critical of federal bailouts of these industries. Again, not nearly critical enough, and not as critical of the private sector, but it’s something. Still, in the midst of a pandemic that has the most ardent free market enthusiasts shouting for a reopening and doing their best to marginalize, if not outright dismiss the death toll it would necessitate, much of the free market fantasy Chomsky details here survives. Those who point to Adam Smith’s “Invisible Hand” being the clearest marker of the Will of the People, those who ardently advocate for states’ rights as a vehicle for the majority become decidedly the reverse when discussing things like, say, abolishing the Electoral College (“Mob rule!”) or instituting a graduated income tax in Illinois (“Anti-business!”). Chomsky claims not to care about “fancy rhetoric,” but he’s got his own particular style that soothes me even as its content infuriates me. It seems pretty clear that those who hold the purse strings and are bending the American public over on the sofa wield this rhetoric quite skillfully. Compare his points then to the world today, and depressingly little has changed. I don’t say we need to fight propaganda with propaganda. I say we need to highlight it for what it is, and to highlight it with some skill can only help.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Flaviu

    This is a short 60 minute talk by Chomsky that explains in large strokes how capitalism, free market and democracy are being undermined by the rich to tip the scales against the masses in their favor. This talk is almost 20 years old, but its hard not to agree with him. It's worth taking into account that this was before Trump, Panama Papers, Snowden and Wikileaks so as always I tip my hat to Chomsky for having tried to bring awareness to these issues back when we had a better chance at solving This is a short 60 minute talk by Chomsky that explains in large strokes how capitalism, free market and democracy are being undermined by the rich to tip the scales against the masses in their favor. This talk is almost 20 years old, but its hard not to agree with him. It's worth taking into account that this was before Trump, Panama Papers, Snowden and Wikileaks so as always I tip my hat to Chomsky for having tried to bring awareness to these issues back when we had a better chance at solving them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Max

    A concise and effective case against the myth that free markets are free and that small government means power for the people.

  6. 5 out of 5

    XO

    Give it a try

  7. 5 out of 5

    Grant

    There’s a lot of these quick Chomsky lectures available and they’re best for introducing people to Chomsky’s works. Especially those with short attention spans. Although Chomsky doesn’t have the time to elaborate on his points in them he gets through a lot and they even serve as a great refresher if you don’t want to reread his other works.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yasser Mohammad

    Chomsky is as usual to the point. No nonsense talk. I cannot judge the quality of the evidence marshaled but some of it is pretty thin. For me the most striking information item was the 50% share of within company transfers in what is called international trade in USA and Japan.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tadas Talaikis

    The problem with fre market is that it is doesn't exist. The problem with fre market is that it is doesn't exist.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dr. Birendra

    the book needs to read

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jay Harris

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jake

  13. 5 out of 5

    Vaishnav Palot Venugopalan

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jozo Gašpar

  15. 4 out of 5

    The Obsessed ( Zazo ) Reader

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dane Mech

  17. 4 out of 5

    Scotty

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  19. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Sverker

    Chomsky is of course very leftist, but it is interesting to hear the conditions of the "free" market. One has to at least think through who benefits from different "reforms" and so on after having read this. Chomsky is of course very leftist, but it is interesting to hear the conditions of the "free" market. One has to at least think through who benefits from different "reforms" and so on after having read this.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Fungus

  21. 4 out of 5

    Protozoan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruslan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Khaled H. Ahmed

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michele Davis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Simeon

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lee Humphries

  27. 5 out of 5

    Matěj

  28. 5 out of 5

    Yanni Papadopoulos

  29. 4 out of 5

    Peter Davies

  30. 4 out of 5

    Danny

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