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Bash Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Bash Users

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The key to mastering any Unix system, especially Linux and Mac OS X, is a thorough knowledge of shell scripting. Scripting is a way to harness and customize the power of any Unix system, and it's an essential skill for any Unix users, including system administrators and professional OS X developers. But beneath this simple promise lies a treacherous ocean of variations in The key to mastering any Unix system, especially Linux and Mac OS X, is a thorough knowledge of shell scripting. Scripting is a way to harness and customize the power of any Unix system, and it's an essential skill for any Unix users, including system administrators and professional OS X developers. But beneath this simple promise lies a treacherous ocean of variations in Unix commands and standards. bash Cookbook teaches shell scripting the way Unix masters practice the craft. It presents a variety of recipes and tricks for all levels of shell programmers so that anyone can become a proficient user of the most common Unix shell -- the bash shell -- and cygwin or other popular Unix emulation packages. Packed full of useful scripts, along with examples that explain how to create better scripts, this new cookbook gives professionals and power users everything they need to automate routine tasks and enable them to truly manage their systems -- rather than have their systems manage them.


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The key to mastering any Unix system, especially Linux and Mac OS X, is a thorough knowledge of shell scripting. Scripting is a way to harness and customize the power of any Unix system, and it's an essential skill for any Unix users, including system administrators and professional OS X developers. But beneath this simple promise lies a treacherous ocean of variations in The key to mastering any Unix system, especially Linux and Mac OS X, is a thorough knowledge of shell scripting. Scripting is a way to harness and customize the power of any Unix system, and it's an essential skill for any Unix users, including system administrators and professional OS X developers. But beneath this simple promise lies a treacherous ocean of variations in Unix commands and standards. bash Cookbook teaches shell scripting the way Unix masters practice the craft. It presents a variety of recipes and tricks for all levels of shell programmers so that anyone can become a proficient user of the most common Unix shell -- the bash shell -- and cygwin or other popular Unix emulation packages. Packed full of useful scripts, along with examples that explain how to create better scripts, this new cookbook gives professionals and power users everything they need to automate routine tasks and enable them to truly manage their systems -- rather than have their systems manage them.

30 review for Bash Cookbook: Solutions and Examples for Bash Users

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

    O'Reilly's "Cookbook" series sometimes gives complex recipes for large tasks, but unfortunately a lot of its listings are just the basic commands of the language in question. That's the case with its Bash Cookbook. Thus one finds recipes like "How to separate variable names from surrounding text" (consisting of nothing more than an encouragement to use ${...}), "How to export variables" (which is only a mention of the "export" syntax), or "Renaming many files" (the solution is a simple for loop). O'Reilly's "Cookbook" series sometimes gives complex recipes for large tasks, but unfortunately a lot of its listings are just the basic commands of the language in question. That's the case with its Bash Cookbook. Thus one finds recipes like "How to separate variable names from surrounding text" (consisting of nothing more than an encouragement to use ${...}), "How to export variables" (which is only a mention of the "export" syntax), or "Renaming many files" (the solution is a simple for loop). These are real basics of bash, or shells in general. So, if you have already read O'Reilly's Learning the bash Shell and Classic Shell Scripting, which I would strongly recommend, then this book will not be of much use to you. A proficient bash/Unix user would already know the vast majority of stuff in here. If you have *not* read those or a comparable introduction to bash and Unix piped commands in general, then you won't really understand much this book, you would just be blindly copying commands. And if you just want to cargo-cult code, then there are innumerable free resources on the web to do so, which you can reach with just a quick Google search of the form "bash" + problem. The book, already large, is padded with some appendices that are quite out of date: how to build bash from source (surely nearly every reader is using the version of bash shipped with his Linux distro), how to use version control (only the ancient RCS, CVS and SVN systems are described). There is some meaty, still useful stuff in here like how to secure a shell script, so I cannot entirely knock the book, but mostly it duplicates content in the two rigorous bash/shell-scripting textbooks that I mentioned above.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kawai

    Works as advertised: A great desktop reference for simple bash commands and script snippets. A quick way to learn, review, and integrate a wide range of bash into everyday sysadmin and developer practice. This is not a comprehensive, theory-driven overview of the bash shell, or an introduction to shell operations writ large; however, it's not intended for that, and users interested in a manual more along those lines would do better to read Learning the bash Shell. Works as advertised: A great desktop reference for simple bash commands and script snippets. A quick way to learn, review, and integrate a wide range of bash into everyday sysadmin and developer practice. This is not a comprehensive, theory-driven overview of the bash shell, or an introduction to shell operations writ large; however, it's not intended for that, and users interested in a manual more along those lines would do better to read Learning the bash Shell.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Um... a good overview, with lots of little details on how bash works. There are places it isn't SUPER in depth, but for the most part it points you to other references then. Um... a good overview, with lots of little details on how bash works. There are places it isn't SUPER in depth, but for the most part it points you to other references then.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin

    There is a new edition of this slated to released shortly. I hope all the examples that fail to quote variable expansions will be fixed in there. Other than that, I found a few nice practices to incorporate into my own workflows.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kerszi

    Książka dosyć gruba, przy tym dosyć droga. Mam wrażenie, że od ilości stron wydawcy ustalają cenę i tych stron dali za dużo na siłę. W każdym rozdziale znajdują się odnośniki, czasem treści kodów źródłowych itd, to rozdmuchuje lekturę. Np są 3 odnośniki i jest już 1 strona. Jest też dużo dodatków. Mimo, że wydana w 2007 roku i jest dosyć stary Bash, lektura jest świetna. Jak ktoś się uczył programowania skryptów w Bashu i czegoś nie wie, z niej się dowie. W niej jest praktycznie wszystko co było Książka dosyć gruba, przy tym dosyć droga. Mam wrażenie, że od ilości stron wydawcy ustalają cenę i tych stron dali za dużo na siłę. W każdym rozdziale znajdują się odnośniki, czasem treści kodów źródłowych itd, to rozdmuchuje lekturę. Np są 3 odnośniki i jest już 1 strona. Jest też dużo dodatków. Mimo, że wydana w 2007 roku i jest dosyć stary Bash, lektura jest świetna. Jak ktoś się uczył programowania skryptów w Bashu i czegoś nie wie, z niej się dowie. W niej jest praktycznie wszystko co było robione do 2007 roku. Wrócę jeszcze do ceny. 90 parę zł to za dużo. Na szczęście była wysprzedaż i lekturę można było kupić za coś koło 20 zł.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Konstantinos

    A well-written book with plenty of juicy technical details, that is strongly recommended to those who may find themselves writing BASH scripts longer than 50 lines on regular basis. A must read for SysAdmin and DevOps professionals.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    This is a reference text, not a book one would normally read cover-to-cover. I've used it half-a-dozen times so far and it's proved useful. *** [three stars]. This is a reference text, not a book one would normally read cover-to-cover. I've used it half-a-dozen times so far and it's proved useful. *** [three stars].

  8. 5 out of 5

    José

    This book is perfect. There's no single page you read that you don't end with a real 'I didn\'t know that' feeling or at least a little piece of new information. This book is perfect. There's no single page you read that you don't end with a real 'I didn\'t know that' feeling or at least a little piece of new information.

  9. 4 out of 5

    James

    Accessible to bash newbies, with good explanations of commands' origins. Accessible to bash newbies, with good explanations of commands' origins.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Frank T. Corey

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  12. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  14. 5 out of 5

    Reny Alvarado

  15. 5 out of 5

    Karagiannakis Stelios

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jorg

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Shea

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Murillo

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maurício Gardini

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bogdan Kulbida

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rhaj Vijay

  25. 5 out of 5

    박은정 Park

  26. 5 out of 5

    RoponixSystems

  27. 4 out of 5

    Agata

  28. 4 out of 5

    zlu

  29. 5 out of 5

    Johan Pretorius

  30. 5 out of 5

    Mark

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