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Michael O'Halloran (Library of Indiana Classics)

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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.


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This book was converted from its physical edition to the digital format by a community of volunteers. You may find it for free on the web. Purchase of the Kindle edition includes wireless delivery.

30 review for Michael O'Halloran (Library of Indiana Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Grace Grzy

    OH. MY. GOODNESS. This is one of the best books ever! My only complaint is that Porter's writing style is a little too wordy for me. Not that she uses a big words, but she just uses A LOT of words, with some unnecessary description. Other than that, I ADORED this book! Michael (aka "Micky") is just the sweetest, wisest, most honorable, and lovable boy you will find in the streets of NYC. I love his slang! ("Nix on the swell dames!") <3 His sense of responsibility and honor for one so young is ins OH. MY. GOODNESS. This is one of the best books ever! My only complaint is that Porter's writing style is a little too wordy for me. Not that she uses a big words, but she just uses A LOT of words, with some unnecessary description. Other than that, I ADORED this book! Michael (aka "Micky") is just the sweetest, wisest, most honorable, and lovable boy you will find in the streets of NYC. I love his slang! ("Nix on the swell dames!") <3 His sense of responsibility and honor for one so young is inspiring, and his relationship with Lily (aka "Peaches") is just charming! Peaches is so sweet, and is most of the time very content, patient, and happy, even with a crippled back. She is so precocious, lovable, loyal and such a spit-fire, it is hard not to want to wrap her up in a big bear hug! The rest of the characters are also amazing! I love them all; Douglas, Leslie, "Daddy", the "Angel Lady", Mr. Milton, and on and on. The story is also stupendous, heartwarming, and inspiring. It is just too hard to sum it up! A wonderful read for just about anybody! I would recommend it for ages 11+, only because the writing is somewhat hard to follow, but it would make a great read-aloud. Not a drop of language, explicit content, or violence. Just pure goodness!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Jamieson

    This is my favorite Stratton-Porter book of all time. I will never forget it. Something in my heart shifted because of the characters in this story and changed me forever. I don't say that about books very often, unless it's the Bible. This is my favorite Stratton-Porter book of all time. I will never forget it. Something in my heart shifted because of the characters in this story and changed me forever. I don't say that about books very often, unless it's the Bible.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    This has quickly become my favorite Gene Stratton-Porter book! Oh how wonderful and pure and wholesome this book is!! You "Laddie" loving friends (all 27 of you on my friends list that have read Laddie) simply must read this!! It's available on Librovox FYI. This has quickly become my favorite Gene Stratton-Porter book! Oh how wonderful and pure and wholesome this book is!! You "Laddie" loving friends (all 27 of you on my friends list that have read Laddie) simply must read this!! It's available on Librovox FYI.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Reading with Hailey 3/18/05. I have really enjoyed Gene Stratton-Porter's other books so I am excited about this one. After reading just the 1st chapter I can see that her writing style is different in this book. On page 428 and I find myself reading this book slowly savoring it. It is now my favorite book by Gene Stratton-Porter. Mickey's sense of seeing what is going on around him and understanding is astounding! He portrays the goodness of Jesus in everything he does. I am also so happy to see Reading with Hailey 3/18/05. I have really enjoyed Gene Stratton-Porter's other books so I am excited about this one. After reading just the 1st chapter I can see that her writing style is different in this book. On page 428 and I find myself reading this book slowly savoring it. It is now my favorite book by Gene Stratton-Porter. Mickey's sense of seeing what is going on around him and understanding is astounding! He portrays the goodness of Jesus in everything he does. I am also so happy to see that the mistakes of Mr. Minturn and his family are being worked out by the success of parental involvement and nature. I have high hopes for Mrs. Minturn. Oh and I so hope that Flowersy-girl will walk again now that she is in a better environment/nature with good loving people! 3/31/15 What a wonderful ending! This book really makes you think about the importance of family life and making your home the best place for your family to grow and thrive in. As Junior said of Multioplolis, "I tell you down among them it looks different from riding past in an automobile". 4/1/15

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mitzi

    I had a real love-hate relationship with this book. I love GSP, even when she pushes the boundaries of sentimentality and preachy morals to their very edge, but there were a few adult characters in this book that were simply insufferable. Luckily, the children more than made up for it - they were what kept me reading. Another thing that really bothered me was her over use of exclamation points - I don't remember noticing it in any of her other novels, but it was very distracting in this one. And I had a real love-hate relationship with this book. I love GSP, even when she pushes the boundaries of sentimentality and preachy morals to their very edge, but there were a few adult characters in this book that were simply insufferable. Luckily, the children more than made up for it - they were what kept me reading. Another thing that really bothered me was her over use of exclamation points - I don't remember noticing it in any of her other novels, but it was very distracting in this one. And for the first time I found her nature descriptions tedious - especially the whole flower basket and bird song story lines. I would say if you haven't read GSP before, don't start here - try Girl Of The Limberlost, The Keeper Of Bees, or The Harvester instead.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Story of a spunky 10y/o orphan boy named Michael. It starts with Michael living alone, hiding from the Children's home, working as a newsboy, and following the rules his Mother gave him before she died. He is quite precocious and meets several interesting people in his day to day activities. Eventually he happens on a poor, dirty, little crippled girl wailing because her abusive granny has died and the Children's Home will be coming after her. Michael manages to get her to his home, clean her up Story of a spunky 10y/o orphan boy named Michael. It starts with Michael living alone, hiding from the Children's home, working as a newsboy, and following the rules his Mother gave him before she died. He is quite precocious and meets several interesting people in his day to day activities. Eventually he happens on a poor, dirty, little crippled girl wailing because her abusive granny has died and the Children's Home will be coming after her. Michael manages to get her to his home, clean her up, and claim her as his family. A lot of responsibility for a 10 year old, which he soon discovers and plots to remedy. Quite an enjoyable tale.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne

    I LOVE Gene Stratton-Porter and contrary to everyone who thinks Freckles is her shining masterpiece, I think Michael O'Hallaran outshines them all. There is a reason that she was making this book into a movie when she had her accident and died. She must have loved this book since she was working tirelessly to create it into a film. This story is so endearing and really teaches us what self-sacrifice and true love really look like. I LOVE Gene Stratton-Porter and contrary to everyone who thinks Freckles is her shining masterpiece, I think Michael O'Hallaran outshines them all. There is a reason that she was making this book into a movie when she had her accident and died. She must have loved this book since she was working tirelessly to create it into a film. This story is so endearing and really teaches us what self-sacrifice and true love really look like.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Lewestover

    This book ranks as one of the best written by Gene Stratton-Porter. With an unlikely hero in Mickey, an orphaned newspaper boy in a large midwestern city, "Michael O'Halloran" tells a delightful tale of home, family, values, the far-reaching effect of small good deeds, abnd the healing power of nature and love. I loved the book! This book ranks as one of the best written by Gene Stratton-Porter. With an unlikely hero in Mickey, an orphaned newspaper boy in a large midwestern city, "Michael O'Halloran" tells a delightful tale of home, family, values, the far-reaching effect of small good deeds, abnd the healing power of nature and love. I loved the book!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Graceann

    "Come on, be square!" The opening line of this novel, wherein Michael O'Halloran urges his competitor to be fair and square in their business, is a grabber. The story remains interesting and nigh on a century after its release, it still compels. One of my all-time favorites. "Come on, be square!" The opening line of this novel, wherein Michael O'Halloran urges his competitor to be fair and square in their business, is a grabber. The story remains interesting and nigh on a century after its release, it still compels. One of my all-time favorites.

  10. 5 out of 5

    ShaLisa

    A charmed story about a young boy and his optimistic, influential life in saving and helping so many others as he lands new family and friends. The boy could do no wrong. His life was tough but he was tougher. Like all Porters books, this one was tender, positive and too good to be true.

  11. 4 out of 5

    momma.hailey

    This book changed me. It was the right book at the right time. My soul was encouraged and challenged by the characters and plot.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Terry Yaceyko

    This is an old favorite that I have read a few times through the years. I read it this fall and enjoyed it so much. I loved the writing and the plot - the comparison between living in the country vs living in the city was good to read. Pros and cons to both. I especially loved the ending - no spoilers here, but it really got to me and was an inspiring read. Loved it. (Very inspiring to those considering adoption.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    Debra

    A wonderful classic about a well mannered orphan boy who works as a newspaper boy. He stumbles upon a small cripple girl alone and in bad condition after her cruel grandmother dies and is removed from the tenement. The story revolves around his caring for her and the people he befriends along the way. Although there are sad parts the overwhelming position and uplifting outlook of Mickey makes this a gem.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mona

    I think this is one of Stratton Porter's best. I like the interweaving of the story of Micky and his little protegee, Peaches; and the story of the Minturns, their wayward boys and their separation and redemption. Sadly, there is some of her typical treatment of non-whites in her depiction of the "squaw" from the swamps. I think this is one of Stratton Porter's best. I like the interweaving of the story of Micky and his little protegee, Peaches; and the story of the Minturns, their wayward boys and their separation and redemption. Sadly, there is some of her typical treatment of non-whites in her depiction of the "squaw" from the swamps.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Micky is an orphan living by his wits in the streets of the city. One day he finds another orphan who is crippled and he is determined to love and protect her. Here is a delightful book of high-quality of friendship, family, and loyalty. Sometimes I'd be irritated at the characters but I couldn't help but love and admire them. Micky is an orphan living by his wits in the streets of the city. One day he finds another orphan who is crippled and he is determined to love and protect her. Here is a delightful book of high-quality of friendship, family, and loyalty. Sometimes I'd be irritated at the characters but I couldn't help but love and admire them.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I just love Porter’s books and this one had all the positive messages and good feels that I expect from her writing. It’s lovely to escape into a time that was a little simpler and yet her themes are timeless and her lessons often strike close to home.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Candace

    The wonderful story of Mickey a newsie who is surviving alone in the big city and ends up befriending and helping many others as well. Great innercity life story with character and compassion. Candace read 11/05.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kari

    I didn't remember I had read this one...or I didn't remember the name of that one book I'd read... Anyway, this was good. I think I'll always like Elnora and Freckles best because I was exposed to them first, and Laddie and his crew are also pretty good. But this one wasn't bad. I didn't remember I had read this one...or I didn't remember the name of that one book I'd read... Anyway, this was good. I think I'll always like Elnora and Freckles best because I was exposed to them first, and Laddie and his crew are also pretty good. But this one wasn't bad.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Addie

    Great story by an amazing author. I love how she captures the details & dialect of the times she writes of! And the sweetness she packs into her stories!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rod Innis

    A great story by a great author

  21. 4 out of 5

    Abigail G

    It was a fun engaging story though at times the main character came across as much too saintly.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Glasser

    Read this book for free through Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/9... Read this book for free through Project Gutenberg: http://www.gutenberg.org/cache/epub/9...

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    I enjoyed Gene Stratton-Porter. My Dad put me on to reading her.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    This book will make you think about who you are.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Laddie is one of my favorite books, so I expected to like this one. I did not. It was a ridiculously sappy, predictable mess, with unbelievable characters. Everyone is just as good as can be.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    How did this book get on my tbr list? I'm so grateful - written in 1915, it was available in my local library system. It's a lovely, sweet, innocent in some ways, naive in others, wise in ever so many more. Quotes I love - ..."Morning. Get up early. Wash your face, brush your clothes. Eat what was left from supper for breakfast. Put your bed to air, then go out with your papers. Don't be afraid to offer them, or to do work of any sort you have strength for; but be deathly afraid to beg, to lie, How did this book get on my tbr list? I'm so grateful - written in 1915, it was available in my local library system. It's a lovely, sweet, innocent in some ways, naive in others, wise in ever so many more. Quotes I love - ..."Morning. Get up early. Wash your face, brush your clothes. Eat what was left from supper for breakfast. Put your bed to air, then go out with your papers. Don't be afraid to offer them, or to do work of any sort you have strength for; but be deathly afraid to beg, to lie, or to steal, while if you starve, freeze, or die, never, never touch any kind of drink." ..."breathe deep, sleep cool and dine sensibly."

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    This story is precious, in the pattern of Freckles, Sir Gibbie and Little Lord Fauntelroy, This one just might be my favorite. My husband Teddy & I enjoyed this in audio.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    Michael OHalloran, a novel by Gene Stratton Porter, is set in Multiopolis, a really silly name for a Chicago-type city. The novel consists of three interconnected stories. In the first, Mickey O’Halloran, an honest and plucky young newsie, rescues a crippled orphan girl from having to the “Orphing Home.” He resolves to adopt her himself, and raise the money to rehabilitate her back himself. Eventually, Mickey and Peaches move out to the country to live with a wholesome farm family and appreciate Michael OHalloran, a novel by Gene Stratton Porter, is set in Multiopolis, a really silly name for a Chicago-type city. The novel consists of three interconnected stories. In the first, Mickey O’Halloran, an honest and plucky young newsie, rescues a crippled orphan girl from having to the “Orphing Home.” He resolves to adopt her himself, and raise the money to rehabilitate her back himself. Eventually, Mickey and Peaches move out to the country to live with a wholesome farm family and appreciate nature. Second there is Douglas, a rising young lawyer dedicated to rooting out corruption in the city and appreciating nature with his fiancée. He hires Mickey to be his assistant. This is the most boring of the three strands. Thirdly, James Minturn (friend of Douglas) has two terribly spoiled little boys. The Minturns move to the country too to save their souls and his marriage by appreciating nature. In the end, all children are rehabilitated and the city is free from corruption. First, the good news. Poor little Peaches is not quite an angel. As befits a slum child, she swears sometimes (though not too badly), and can be selfish and stubborn. Her interactions with Mickey are often touching and cute. Then, the third strand, about James Minturn trying to save his family, is really quite absorbing. Perhaps it is a little unrealistic, how easily everything falls into place once he starts, but appealing nonetheless. Like Gene Stratton Porter’s oeuvre in general, this novel suffers from an increasingly pedantic and self-righteous tone. The author’s opinions on rich people and cities are very pointed and quite obvious. Mickey starts the story as being quite likable. Then he begins lecturing everyone under the sun on how to live properly. However, he’s not nearly as bad as, say, Linda Strong from Her Father’s Daughter. His sermons do not ruin his story the way Linda’s lectures did hers. Sweet at times, smug at times, Michael O’Halloran held my attention and I was glad to have read it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Teri-K

    This book started out great old-fashioned fun. Mickey, an orphan on the streets of a large city, finds a crippled girl named Peaches and makes her his own. He provides for her and takes care of her, even going to a hospital to learn what she needs. It's totally unrealistic but sweetly quaint. I enjoyed all of Mickey's story, with Bruce and Leslie and the farm, even though Mickey could be too long-winded. At one point he explained everything to Bruce, then to the newspaper man, then to someone el This book started out great old-fashioned fun. Mickey, an orphan on the streets of a large city, finds a crippled girl named Peaches and makes her his own. He provides for her and takes care of her, even going to a hospital to learn what she needs. It's totally unrealistic but sweetly quaint. I enjoyed all of Mickey's story, with Bruce and Leslie and the farm, even though Mickey could be too long-winded. At one point he explained everything to Bruce, then to the newspaper man, then to someone else, then to Peter... Way too much talking! But if the book had only consisted of that story I would have given it three stars. Unfortunately we also have the Minturn's, an upper class family whose life would make a soap opera of the worst kind. It was maudlin and overwrought and I pretty much hated every minute of it. Plus, there was a lot of it I kept having to endure. That and a big investigation that turned out to go nowhere brought the overall score down. Not one of S-P's best, read Girl of the Limberlost, Freckles, Laddie or The Harvester before you try this one.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Though Gene Stratton-Porter's style is "over the top", I have always made it through the gag reflex early on =) and become quite loyaly invested in her stories and her characters. Though often "larger than life" her imagery and skillful character development has previously made it easy to imagine places and people which are as pristine and wholesome as she portrays them and the transportation of potential and possibility has been a lovely, uplifting diversion from the "reality" of the world we o Though Gene Stratton-Porter's style is "over the top", I have always made it through the gag reflex early on =) and become quite loyaly invested in her stories and her characters. Though often "larger than life" her imagery and skillful character development has previously made it easy to imagine places and people which are as pristine and wholesome as she portrays them and the transportation of potential and possibility has been a lovely, uplifting diversion from the "reality" of the world we often live in. I kept reading this story, waiting for that transition, but it never came. I could not buy into the characters or all the melodrama, nor did I want to. Michael was meant to be the epitome of goodness, but came off as annoyingly unbelievable and the adults weren't fleshed out enough to induce me to care about their joys or sorrows, which makes it hard to buy into the story. I know this is beloved by some, but I just couldn't relate.

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