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VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にてアスナが遭遇した、とあるアバターの正体とは?  キリトとシノンが巻き込まれた《死銃(デス・ガン)》事件から数週間。  妖精アバターによる次世代飛行系VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にて、奇妙な騒動が起こる。新マップ《浮遊城アインクラッド》、その第24層主街区北部に現われる謎のアバターは、自身の持つ《オリジナル・ソードスキル》を賭け、1体1の対戦(デュエル)で、すべてを蹴散らし続けているという。 《黒の剣士》キリトすらも打ち負かした、《絶剣》と呼ばれるその剣豪アバターにアスナも決闘を挑むのだが、結果、紙一重の差で敗北してしまう。  しかし、そのデュエルが終わるやいなや、《絶剣》はアスナを自身のギルドに誘い始めた!? 《絶剣》と呼ばれるほどの剣の冴え。そこには、とある秘密が隠されており──。 『マザーズ・ロザ VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にてアスナが遭遇した、とあるアバターの正体とは?  キリトとシノンが巻き込まれた《死銃(デス・ガン)》事件から数週間。  妖精アバターによる次世代飛行系VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にて、奇妙な騒動が起こる。新マップ《浮遊城アインクラッド》、その第24層主街区北部に現われる謎のアバターは、自身の持つ《オリジナル・ソードスキル》を賭け、1体1の対戦(デュエル)で、すべてを蹴散らし続けているという。 《黒の剣士》キリトすらも打ち負かした、《絶剣》と呼ばれるその剣豪アバターにアスナも決闘を挑むのだが、結果、紙一重の差で敗北してしまう。  しかし、そのデュエルが終わるやいなや、《絶剣》はアスナを自身のギルドに誘い始めた!? 《絶剣》と呼ばれるほどの剣の冴え。そこには、とある秘密が隠されており──。 『マザーズ・ロザリオ』 編、登場!


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VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にてアスナが遭遇した、とあるアバターの正体とは?  キリトとシノンが巻き込まれた《死銃(デス・ガン)》事件から数週間。  妖精アバターによる次世代飛行系VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にて、奇妙な騒動が起こる。新マップ《浮遊城アインクラッド》、その第24層主街区北部に現われる謎のアバターは、自身の持つ《オリジナル・ソードスキル》を賭け、1体1の対戦(デュエル)で、すべてを蹴散らし続けているという。 《黒の剣士》キリトすらも打ち負かした、《絶剣》と呼ばれるその剣豪アバターにアスナも決闘を挑むのだが、結果、紙一重の差で敗北してしまう。  しかし、そのデュエルが終わるやいなや、《絶剣》はアスナを自身のギルドに誘い始めた!? 《絶剣》と呼ばれるほどの剣の冴え。そこには、とある秘密が隠されており──。 『マザーズ・ロザ VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にてアスナが遭遇した、とあるアバターの正体とは?  キリトとシノンが巻き込まれた《死銃(デス・ガン)》事件から数週間。  妖精アバターによる次世代飛行系VRMMO《アルヴヘイム・オンライン》にて、奇妙な騒動が起こる。新マップ《浮遊城アインクラッド》、その第24層主街区北部に現われる謎のアバターは、自身の持つ《オリジナル・ソードスキル》を賭け、1体1の対戦(デュエル)で、すべてを蹴散らし続けているという。 《黒の剣士》キリトすらも打ち負かした、《絶剣》と呼ばれるその剣豪アバターにアスナも決闘を挑むのだが、結果、紙一重の差で敗北してしまう。  しかし、そのデュエルが終わるやいなや、《絶剣》はアスナを自身のギルドに誘い始めた!? 《絶剣》と呼ばれるほどの剣の冴え。そこには、とある秘密が隠されており──。 『マザーズ・ロザリオ』 編、登場!

30 review for ソードアート・オンライン7: マザーズ・ロザリオ

  1. 4 out of 5

    Speed

    SAO 7: Mother's Rosario is such a good story, it literally made me stop reading twice to not cry. After I was finished with it, I went to bed to contain my feels. SAO 7: Mother's Rosario is such a good story, it literally made me stop reading twice to not cry. After I was finished with it, I went to bed to contain my feels.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kaeri

    Set after the events of Phantom Bullet, we get to see how our heroes and characters came together and are now co-existing in ALO. Even Sinon migrated over, haha! Anyway, Mother's Rosario's plot is less complicated than the first six books. It's more like a side-story. We get to read from Asuna's point of view and we get to see how she lives her real life, and the kind of struggles she's having with her family. Our new character is Zekken aka Yuuki aka Absolute Sword. She is the star of this volume Set after the events of Phantom Bullet, we get to see how our heroes and characters came together and are now co-existing in ALO. Even Sinon migrated over, haha! Anyway, Mother's Rosario's plot is less complicated than the first six books. It's more like a side-story. We get to read from Asuna's point of view and we get to see how she lives her real life, and the kind of struggles she's having with her family. Our new character is Zekken aka Yuuki aka Absolute Sword. She is the star of this volume, and this book basically revolves around her and her story with Asuna. This is a very sad book, and there were certainly heart-tugging moments. It was nice to see how well our characters (from SAO, ALO and GGO) have all adapted into the New ALfheim and how they all became friends. Virtual Reality was no longer just a virtual world to them, it was another half of their "Reality". Oh, how I wish I can experience that kind of gaming :( This volume is more about the personal and emotional struggles of Asuna and Yuuki, and their growth as characters.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jorge Rosas

    Such a moving history still SAO but it feels different, in a good sense, even the author seems to have grown and matured. Asuna is now our main character and we can see her struggle between her family and the things she wants to do. Living by others standards or having a blind and choking goal are some of the things Asuna will have to face in order to achieve her own path. We get to know the hard story of The Sleeping Knights and their leader Yuuki. Through them we get to appreciate life and the Such a moving history still SAO but it feels different, in a good sense, even the author seems to have grown and matured. Asuna is now our main character and we can see her struggle between her family and the things she wants to do. Living by others standards or having a blind and choking goal are some of the things Asuna will have to face in order to achieve her own path. We get to know the hard story of The Sleeping Knights and their leader Yuuki. Through them we get to appreciate life and the real important things. It was such a wonderful book, tears rolled and perspectives touched. The anime is quite faithful to the book, but still there are some things left only to be discovered here. Also, get quite a shocking surprise thanks to Kayaba Akihiko.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Hans

    The best story out of all volumes and think it'll still be. Deeply touching, philosophically fundamental, and solid essence. In spite of focus on Asuna, it's getting blurred midway, in a more outstanding direction with shift to the key character, Konno Yuuki, where her principle to stay herself without mind about what other people think is the most I have to agree on. Didn't even expect I actually learned what it means for them who struggle in the harshness. Quite an experience to feel such emot The best story out of all volumes and think it'll still be. Deeply touching, philosophically fundamental, and solid essence. In spite of focus on Asuna, it's getting blurred midway, in a more outstanding direction with shift to the key character, Konno Yuuki, where her principle to stay herself without mind about what other people think is the most I have to agree on. Didn't even expect I actually learned what it means for them who struggle in the harshness. Quite an experience to feel such emotion first time through plain text.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    After books one and two, this is the best book in the series. Finally is not just about the virtual world and defeating bosses or crazy psychopaths and savings the world, finally is also more about the real life, the struggles, and the pains for when life is not what you expect it to be. I loved it. It's terribly sad indeed, but I think that's what I enjoyed the most, because it felt much more real than the previous books (safe for the first 2 of course). After books one and two, this is the best book in the series. Finally is not just about the virtual world and defeating bosses or crazy psychopaths and savings the world, finally is also more about the real life, the struggles, and the pains for when life is not what you expect it to be. I loved it. It's terribly sad indeed, but I think that's what I enjoyed the most, because it felt much more real than the previous books (safe for the first 2 of course).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne Nelson

    I knew the ending from the anime. I still cried finishing this book last night.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    3.5 stars If you look at the Sword Art Online light novel series through the first seven books, Mother's Rosary is arguably the best by most metrics. It's focused, has a clear beginning and end, takes SAO's themes in identifiable-yet-new directions. It's a rousing success. I love that it uses only Asuna as the point-of-view character (the others flip-flop between multiple perspectives), and I love that it's Asuna who gets this singular focus, not Kirito. Her character has been languishing, really 3.5 stars If you look at the Sword Art Online light novel series through the first seven books, Mother's Rosary is arguably the best by most metrics. It's focused, has a clear beginning and end, takes SAO's themes in identifiable-yet-new directions. It's a rousing success. I love that it uses only Asuna as the point-of-view character (the others flip-flop between multiple perspectives), and I love that it's Asuna who gets this singular focus, not Kirito. Her character has been languishing, really ever since the end of the first volume; after all, in v.3 and 4 she's cooped up in a cage for Kirito to rescue, and in v.5 and 6 Kirito is playing a game that she's not. Her story here goes two distinct places: 1. Her IRL is in shambles due to her mother's draconian oversight, who doesn't understand Asuna's continued interest in VR, who demands a better school, more focus, and a viable prospective husband (Kirito, obviously, being viewed as not). 2. In-game, lured by curiosity (and the promise of a major prize if victorious), Asuna has a PVP duel against The Ultimate Sword. However, the duel doesn't end—rather, The Ultimate Sword sees something in Asuna she likes and whisks her away to meet her guild, where they will request her help in defeating a boss. The IRL part is just so so frustrating. By far my least favorite part of the anime. A part of that frustration is with Asuna's mother, whose "my way or the highway" approach to parenting strikes a sour note with me. Obviously, she's supposed to be irritating like that, but that doesn't make it fun. But the other part of my frustration has to do with the way Asuna responds to her through most of the book. It's that respectful/apologetic/we-can't-say-what-we-think shit that feels so cliché in anime. I assume its proliferation in anime/manga has some basis in Japanese cultural norms—although judging a society based on its fiction is erroneous (imagine someone making judgments about American families based on, like, The Simpsons or Breaking Bad), so it's more likely a caricaturization. Whatever the case, it's not shocking here, nor do I even blame Asuna or the author; it is what it is. It still annoys the heck out of me. Then the in-game stuff, which has a really good first half, gets so goddamned emotional. Like to the point it feels like manipulation. Hey, I cried, so it was effective. I also respect this part of the story for being able to broaden SOA's scope while still remaining true to it. It's very well done. But there's an inherent amount of dread to this arc, at least knowing how it all ends, so I spend most of my time steeling myself for the major emotional points. I'm—to the best of my ability—making the choice that Asuna doesn't: She pays no heed to The Ultimate Sword (and her guild's) warnings to emotionally distance herself—which means us readers, who perhaps would rather emotionally distant, are along for the ride and have to make do on the fly. It's very exhausting. Which places me in something of a conundrum: v.7 might be the best SAO volume, but it's also my least favorite (so far, and hopefully overall).

  8. 4 out of 5

    Callum Forsyth

    While quite a drastic tone shift from the regularly scheduled Sword Art Online material, the shift of focus to Asuna and an emotionally powerful story that she goes through is a long awaited step in the right direction. The more critical minds evaluating this series seem to agree that this arc is where Sword Art Online finally begins to make strides, a sentiment I am inclined to agree with. Mother's Rosary delivers not only the strongest story arc in the main series (so far), but it also delivers While quite a drastic tone shift from the regularly scheduled Sword Art Online material, the shift of focus to Asuna and an emotionally powerful story that she goes through is a long awaited step in the right direction. The more critical minds evaluating this series seem to agree that this arc is where Sword Art Online finally begins to make strides, a sentiment I am inclined to agree with. Mother's Rosary delivers not only the strongest story arc in the main series (so far), but it also delivers a much needed character arc for main character Asuna Yuuki. Asuna has been in dire need of some character development throughout the entirety of the last few volumes, having been relegated to the Protagonist's Girl role. This volume delivers very well on that, albeit not perfectly; Asuna has some truly strong moments here which are unfortunately undermined by her over-reliance on Kirito and the strength she feels she gains from his existence. This volume also delivers who I consider to be the best character in the Sword Art Online franchise so far: Yuuki, referred to as the Absolute Sword. Yuuki is an intensely likeable character that rivals Kirito in terms of strength within the VRMMO genre (which instantly gives her brownie points in my eyes) and is so very easy to root for. Those who consider Yuuki to be a typical side-story character will find themselves surprised, as Yuuki's character is the first instance I judge to have at least some level of true depth. Yuuki's role within this story will, I hope, have a heavy impact not only on the story going forward, but Asuna's character in particular. So given the unusual amount of praise I've offered so far, why do I not give this book a higher rating? It's because while this is certainly a step in the right direction, it still isn't perfect. I've come to the point where I think the Sword Art Online narrative would be far more compelling and enjoyable if Asuna Yuuki were the main character of the series instead of Kazuto Kirigaya (Kirito). When given a chance to exist as her own entity, not the romantic hanger-on of an immensely unlikable protagonist, Asuna truly has an interesting character that could be developed intricately if treated well. Asuna is relatable, understandable and easy to sympathise with, whereas Kirito is bland, unlikable and has no true emotional range on a believable scale. On the whole, despite its issues, Mother's Rosary is the first genuinely enjoyable novel I've found in the Sword Art Online main series and the praise it has received is deserved. Kawahara certainly has areas he needs to work on, in particular this constant idolising of Kirito which is unwarranted given how lacking the character is, but he has clearly started to understand that a level of nuance is required when it comes to writing a compelling story and this is a welcome change.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Tuna

    Mother’s Rosary finds itself in that place where it interrupts the flow of the main story to tell a side story that has no real importance on the main story, or so it seems. There are some world building details here that helps to explain how our characters are living their lives as normal teenagers while coming of age in terms of finding what they want to do with the rest of their life or how to deal with or handle relationships with family now that they’ve faced death before. For Asuna, the ma Mother’s Rosary finds itself in that place where it interrupts the flow of the main story to tell a side story that has no real importance on the main story, or so it seems. There are some world building details here that helps to explain how our characters are living their lives as normal teenagers while coming of age in terms of finding what they want to do with the rest of their life or how to deal with or handle relationships with family now that they’ve faced death before. For Asuna, the main character here, it helps here handle a deteriorating relationship with her parents who seemingly want here to inherit the family business. That aside, the exploration of full dive for terminally ill patients or otherwise disabled patients is a compelling thought or exploration of such technology. Giving such patients the chance to have experiences they wouldn’t otherwise experience in the real world was a touching and heartfelt thought experiment. Perhaps someday such technology will be real. The story was a fast read and emotional showing that Kawahara really knows how to tug the heartstrings. The action was his usual as well even if Kirito or Leafa weren’t the main characters here. The new character, Yuuki, was fantastic. Overall a good read. For anime watchers, found it to be comparable, though I think I give it the edge of the anime, some of the lines just read better/flow better/touch the heart better than what the anime (though good) did. Also, I thought the science explanation here was a bit better, though, a bit too written like someone who did the research but didn’t understand most of what they researched.

  10. 4 out of 5

    emily_oriley

    This is definitely a love or hate story for Asuna fans. Either it showcases her inner emotions and lets you fully understand her or it presents her as a meek and passive person that just suffers silently because she doesn’t want to trouble others around her thus contradicting her fierce character from the first SAO volume. Personally, my response is 1) cultural differences particularly for Japanese girls/women and 2) everyone is tougher online - just spending five minutes in any comment section This is definitely a love or hate story for Asuna fans. Either it showcases her inner emotions and lets you fully understand her or it presents her as a meek and passive person that just suffers silently because she doesn’t want to trouble others around her thus contradicting her fierce character from the first SAO volume. Personally, my response is 1) cultural differences particularly for Japanese girls/women and 2) everyone is tougher online - just spending five minutes in any comment section will tell you that. Anyway, this is a much different story then what has come before. There aren’t really stakes as far as the “life and death” scenarios we’ve come to expect from SAO books. This is solely an emotional journey for Asuna with everyone else acting as mere background characters. There are some action scenes but, again, the stakes are purely emotional so if that’s not your thing, this is probably an okay book to skip as it really doesn’t introduce any characters you’ll be seeing later on (well one is mentioned in the last page but not even by name - you’ll literally be like “oh yeah, Kazuto said he met somebody once before” when that person pops up again in, what, two or three volumes).

  11. 4 out of 5

    Krusiv

    Coincidentally the book opens with character descriptors for all the main players. Asuna has two, and in both she is described as someone's other. Kirito's girlfriend and Kyouko's daughter. Thankfully Mother's Rosary (or Rosario) is a sidestory volume entirely focused on Asuna and here is where she becomes her own fleshed out character. My overall theory with Sword Art Online so far is that it's at its best when it focuses on the importance of having healthy online relationships. How those relati Coincidentally the book opens with character descriptors for all the main players. Asuna has two, and in both she is described as someone's other. Kirito's girlfriend and Kyouko's daughter. Thankfully Mother's Rosary (or Rosario) is a sidestory volume entirely focused on Asuna and here is where she becomes her own fleshed out character. My overall theory with Sword Art Online so far is that it's at its best when it focuses on the importance of having healthy online relationships. How those relationships reflect the real world, and the ways in which these online interactions are threatened. It has been a rocky road for me so far, Fairy Dance in particular being truly awful, but if the author can stay focused on these themes and reign in his bad habits then I will be very excited to read more SAO. I can't blame anyone for disliking or even outright hating the series though. Reki Kawahara has numerous bad habits as a writer that might as well throw all of the goodwill it earns into the garbage. The afterword in this book is a moment of self-awareness from Kawahara regarding his bad habits. That also gives me hope for the future of Sword Art Online.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aakash Yadav

    This was one of the best in the series. It was a fast paced and an emotional roller coaster ride. It made me teary eyed, made me smile, it was just great. This book is from Asuna's POV. Finally, she gets the spotlight. Asuna is having identify crisis. She thinks she is different from Asuna the Flash, she thinks she is weak while Asuna the Flash is strong, she thinks Kirito loves Asuna the Flash so she don't want to appear weak and hence doesn't tell Kirito she is having problems at her home. That This was one of the best in the series. It was a fast paced and an emotional roller coaster ride. It made me teary eyed, made me smile, it was just great. This book is from Asuna's POV. Finally, she gets the spotlight. Asuna is having identify crisis. She thinks she is different from Asuna the Flash, she thinks she is weak while Asuna the Flash is strong, she thinks Kirito loves Asuna the Flash so she don't want to appear weak and hence doesn't tell Kirito she is having problems at her home. That she might have to change schools and leave them behind. And then comes Yuuki, she teaches Asuna that sometimes you have to confront your problems instead of accepting it. I just love Yuuki and her dazzling smile. The ending was sad. I might have actually cried if I didn't already knew the story from the anime.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Thành Tuấn

    I can't enjoy the anime and care about Jukii's death. But after reading the novels, how optimistic she is, i wonder. I learn important things from her :"Sometimes you have to fight to get your point across.” It’s okay to live, even if there’s no greater point to living". I always feel boring everyday, i can't enjoy my life and recognize its value until i read this book. Eugeo and Jukki , they are two characters that taught me so many precious things. so sad when they death I can't enjoy the anime and care about Jukii's death. But after reading the novels, how optimistic she is, i wonder. I learn important things from her :"Sometimes you have to fight to get your point across.” It’s okay to live, even if there’s no greater point to living". I always feel boring everyday, i can't enjoy my life and recognize its value until i read this book. Eugeo and Jukki , they are two characters that taught me so many precious things. so sad when they death

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ariel

    I know why people dislike this series, even so I still can't help but enjoy this series myself. I love the idea of a virtual world being as real as reality. Again these newer arcs are far better than the older ones and they increase my curiosity. At first I thought I was going to give up my copies of SAO but as I read on, I really want to read more of the books. :) I know why people dislike this series, even so I still can't help but enjoy this series myself. I love the idea of a virtual world being as real as reality. Again these newer arcs are far better than the older ones and they increase my curiosity. At first I thought I was going to give up my copies of SAO but as I read on, I really want to read more of the books. :)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Mayberry

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A thrilling story from start to finish. An emotional roller coaster that peaks when you discover that Yuuki has HIV virus and the ways VR technology has helped her cope with her illness, then crashes once Yuuki breathes her last breathe while connected to VR. A great story for the loved ones of anybody who suffers from HIV or AIDS virus.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Dani

    Definitely not a regular SOA novel, this one will leave you with a lot of feels at the end. Really good story though. I feel bad it took me so long to get into and read to the end. I think, for me, it has a slow start, but picked up after about halfway through. It was really good though and had a great ending. Looking forward to reading Vol 8.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heather Wright

    This book was just as wonderful and touching as the anime version. The reveal of Yuuki and her friends, of who they are, and of the profound effect meeting them has on Asuna is amazingly well done. If you are a fan of Asuna you will enjoy this story focused on her.

  18. 5 out of 5

    John

    This was the darkest of the SOA books so far by far.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    Wasn't expecting such a soft tearjerker after all the action of the previous novels! Makes me wonder what the next installment will be like. Wasn't expecting such a soft tearjerker after all the action of the previous novels! Makes me wonder what the next installment will be like.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Yee

    I watched the anime before reading the book. Still very affecting, especially the ending.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I loved this. Sobbed. Definitely a change of pace from previous books in the series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    The plot of this part of the story took a turn I wasn't exactly expecting, but I really liked it. I think it gave a great message. The plot of this part of the story took a turn I wasn't exactly expecting, but I really liked it. I think it gave a great message.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Indah Fajarwati

    This volume is really sad...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Spencer Headman

    It’s gets a little testy. Even though I knew what was coming from watching the anime. This still made me tear up a bit. It defiantly worth the read!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Maaz

    one of my all time favorite books.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Echo

    4.5 Good! Did not expect such a dramatic plot but am definitely pleased with the way it turns out!! This is by far the best book of the series!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Rousseau

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In the last 30 pages I think I cried about eight different times Id put the book down stop crying pick it back up and would cry again

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sukvinai

    So good

  29. 5 out of 5

    Trish

    A really heart felt story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Mira

    If you know the characters of the SAO story, this is, without a doubt, the best story in the series. Leaning back into the sci fi elements, we finally get a peak into how this game has influenced the larger world Give it a read even if you’re someone, like myself, who has been extremely aware of SAO’s numerous flaws

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