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Lost Lives: The Stories of the Men, Women and Children who Died as a Result of the Northern Ireland Troubles

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This is the story of the Northern Ireland troubles told as never before. It is not concerned with the political bickering, but with the lives of those who have suffered and the deaths which have resulted from more than three decades of conflict. Over a seven-year period, the authors examined every death which was directly caused by the troubles. Their research involved int This is the story of the Northern Ireland troubles told as never before. It is not concerned with the political bickering, but with the lives of those who have suffered and the deaths which have resulted from more than three decades of conflict. Over a seven-year period, the authors examined every death which was directly caused by the troubles. Their research involved interviewing witnesses, scouring published material, and drawing on a range of investigative sources to produce this study. They trace the origins of the conflict from the firing of the first shots, through the carnage of the 1970s and 1980s and up to the republican and loyalist ceasefires and beyond. All the casualties are remembered here - the RUC officer, the young soldier, the IRA volunteer, the loyalist paramilitary, the Catholic mother, the Protestant worker, and the new-born baby.


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This is the story of the Northern Ireland troubles told as never before. It is not concerned with the political bickering, but with the lives of those who have suffered and the deaths which have resulted from more than three decades of conflict. Over a seven-year period, the authors examined every death which was directly caused by the troubles. Their research involved int This is the story of the Northern Ireland troubles told as never before. It is not concerned with the political bickering, but with the lives of those who have suffered and the deaths which have resulted from more than three decades of conflict. Over a seven-year period, the authors examined every death which was directly caused by the troubles. Their research involved interviewing witnesses, scouring published material, and drawing on a range of investigative sources to produce this study. They trace the origins of the conflict from the firing of the first shots, through the carnage of the 1970s and 1980s and up to the republican and loyalist ceasefires and beyond. All the casualties are remembered here - the RUC officer, the young soldier, the IRA volunteer, the loyalist paramilitary, the Catholic mother, the Protestant worker, and the new-born baby.

30 review for Lost Lives: The Stories of the Men, Women and Children who Died as a Result of the Northern Ireland Troubles

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bryant

    Update. You can only read this book a few pages at a time, it's very upsetting. It gives you like no other account I ever read the details of urban guerilla war. I'll give one example. On 9 August 1971 running gun battles erupted between the IRA, the Protestant militias and the British Army. It was chaos. 12 people died in one night. Here's one of the 12 deaths : A reporter from the Irish Times named Kevin Myers was in the middle of it. He was in a house and was shot at by some sniper from a house Update. You can only read this book a few pages at a time, it's very upsetting. It gives you like no other account I ever read the details of urban guerilla war. I'll give one example. On 9 August 1971 running gun battles erupted between the IRA, the Protestant militias and the British Army. It was chaos. 12 people died in one night. Here's one of the 12 deaths : A reporter from the Irish Times named Kevin Myers was in the middle of it. He was in a house and was shot at by some sniper from a house across the road. A soldier who was down in the street shot at the sniper and the reporter thought that saved his life. He ran down to the street to get away from the madness. He saw three kids throwing stones at the soldiers from an alley between two houses. He told them there was shooting going on and they didn't believe him, they hadn't noticed it. Then the soldier who had just shot at the sniper thought there was another sniper in the alley where the kids were, and fired again. His shot ricocheted off a wall and fragments of the one bullet hit the three boys he couldn't even see; one lost the fingers of one hand, another lost the back of his head but survived; the third was 16 year old Leo McGuigan. I crouched beside him but he was dead to my fingers, and no blood came from the tiny hole in his cheek. We put his lifeless lolling body in a car. This was just a random car which was passing and had stopped to help. As the car began to drive away the same soldier aimed his automatic weapon at it but this time several people told him not to fire and he didn't. **** This is a five star book and I’ll probably never finish it, I’m only on page 60 of 1542 closely printed pages, it will take years. But it’s a stunning achievement, and I wanted to make a point about it. This book tells the story of every single death caused by the Troubles in Northern Ireland and England. The first one on 11 June 1966 (John Scullion, aged 28, single, storeman) all the way through to the last, on 8 May 2006 (Michael McIlveen, aged 15, schoolboy – number 3712). 2006 is when the last edition was published. There have been a few more deaths since then, but not that many. A handful. So – 3,712 death over a period of 40 years. From three year old Jonathan Ball, an English kid killed in Warrington, a town in England, when the IRA planted bombs in litter bins in a shopping mall (a 12 year old boy was also killed in that one) all the way to 91 year old Martha Smylie who was killed by a UDA bomb which was planted at the Imperial Hotel in Belfast. The bomb damaged her old peoples’ home next door and this old lady was badly injured, and died the following day. This book, with austere reserved grace gives us the people back from the statistics. If you’re interested in Northern Ireland, or civil conflict, or terrorism, or what happens when police fire into a crowd, or a car bomb goes off in a crowded street, or how people live when the ground is crumbling under their feet, this is a must have. That there should be a similar volume for the victims of all conflicts is self-evident, just as self-evidently there never will be. * Postscript: I mentioned this book to a colleague of mine, we've worked in the same office for years, and she comes from Strabane, a border town in Northern Ireland. It turned out that Number 2555, Ronnie Finlay, aged 32, Protestant, married, 3 children, factory worker, shot by the IRA on 23 August 1983 as he left his factory, was her dad's best friend.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    After getting only a short way into this book the waste of life was aready crystal clear...anyone in or out of Northern Ireland, or anywhere else for that matter, who thinks violence is the answer should read this (or even just slowly flick through it) and see that it achieves nothing except needless pain and suffering generally by those not involved. I may be described as heartless at times but this has even brought tears to my eyes. The aim of the book is to provide a chronological list of all After getting only a short way into this book the waste of life was aready crystal clear...anyone in or out of Northern Ireland, or anywhere else for that matter, who thinks violence is the answer should read this (or even just slowly flick through it) and see that it achieves nothing except needless pain and suffering generally by those not involved. I may be described as heartless at times but this has even brought tears to my eyes. The aim of the book is to provide a chronological list of all those who have died during the Troubles in Northern Ireland, either through direct violence or indirectly as a result of actions taken during this time. And that is exactly what the authors have done, without prejudice or bias, they have produced an epic work that cuts through all the scandals, finger-pointing and accusations that dominate all the other works written about the Troubles and simply states who, where and how without trying to assess the why (which lets face it no-one has ever really managed to answer properly). There may be some who believe that more detail should have been given to provide more context for each death, but had the authors done this the work would have lost it's poignancy and impact as the individual deaths got lost in the political and religious miasma. This work may be written objectively but as you read it you cannot help getting sympathetic, sad, angry and frustrated at the immense lose of life that went on year after year despite all communities condemning death after death after death. This work shows that war of any kind is not only needless but wastes lives on all sides whether the people affected are involved or not and shows how terror and fear cripple communities into submission despite their resistance. The only question left to answer by this book is why?

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Whyte

    http://nhw.livejournal.com/600160.html[return][return]I haven't finished this. I never will. It is too heart-rending. It lists 3697 victims of the Troubles, including not only those who died as a direct result of violent acts, but also others whose deaths, ostensibly due to natural causes, was obviously related to the violence.[return][return]The gut-wrenching thing is the sheer pointlessness of it all. The bloke who worked for the Queen as a royal coachman, out bird-watching one day, killed by http://nhw.livejournal.com/600160.html[return][return]I haven't finished this. I never will. It is too heart-rending. It lists 3697 victims of the Troubles, including not only those who died as a direct result of violent acts, but also others whose deaths, ostensibly due to natural causes, was obviously related to the violence.[return][return]The gut-wrenching thing is the sheer pointlessness of it all. The bloke who worked for the Queen as a royal coachman, out bird-watching one day, killed by the British army in crossfire in a battle with the IRA. The Unionist councillor, blown up in his car, on his way out of a meeting where he had asked fellow councillors to show a mark of respect to a Catholic victim of Loyalists a few days before.[return][return]I found I had forgotten so much of this. I had certainly forgotten, if I had ever known, that a 61-year-old bank manager and his 19-year-old daughter were shot around the corner from our house in September 1976. She died on the spot; he lingered for five weeks. The perpetrators are believed to have got the impression that the father's recent promotion to "Chief Inspector" meant that he was a senior policeman.[return][return]It's all terrible, all difficult to read. The worst of all are the stories of children like the little girl killed in the Omagh bomb at the age of 20 months, as her mother was buying her shoes for her uncle's wedding where she was to be a flower girl.[return][return]"The child's father was left with the task of telling his three other children, aged six, three and two, that their baby sister had died and that at the same time their mother was critically ill. He had gone to the hospital looking for them and was told that his wife was alive but was to be taken to the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast by helicopter. 'Half an hour later,' he said, 'I was told a baby had been found and a priest led me to the ward. When I reached the ward they told me that this baby was dead and asked if I would look to see if it was ours. It was.'"[return][return]Grim though it is, I am really glad that the authors went to the trouble of compiling all this information. Putting everyone in context, all in one book, sorted only by chronological order, is a reminder that whatever the grand historical rights and wrongs, death is death and all who died left loved ones behind them. I wish this kind of survey could be done for other conflicts.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Magin

    This was a very clear, very formulaic breakdown of the troubles. The timeline-style layout didn't make for the most engaging writing, but it was very easily understandable. The pace is quick, which is great for readability, but a little challenging because some of the biggest events—Bloody Sunday, the Hunger Strike, and the Good Friday—feel like they get glossed over. This was a very clear, very formulaic breakdown of the troubles. The timeline-style layout didn't make for the most engaging writing, but it was very easily understandable. The pace is quick, which is great for readability, but a little challenging because some of the biggest events—Bloody Sunday, the Hunger Strike, and the Good Friday—feel like they get glossed over.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    It took me over 2 and a half years to read this book from start to finish, over 1600 pages of small print and double columns, and today I finished with death number 3637 after reviewing over 30 years of the de facto civil war in Northern Ireland euphemistically dubbed "The Troubles". This book is a labor of love and compassion by the four journalists who worked on it over the course of seven years. It is unlike any book I have ever read, in that it tells the tale in chronological order, without It took me over 2 and a half years to read this book from start to finish, over 1600 pages of small print and double columns, and today I finished with death number 3637 after reviewing over 30 years of the de facto civil war in Northern Ireland euphemistically dubbed "The Troubles". This book is a labor of love and compassion by the four journalists who worked on it over the course of seven years. It is unlike any book I have ever read, in that it tells the tale in chronological order, without taking sides, of each and every person killed as a result of the conflict in Northern Ireland from its inception in 1966 to the denouement in 1999. The effect is overwhelming, which is why it took me so long to finish--I could generally only read 2-3 pages at a sitting. The incredible human toll, the waste, the confusion, the passion, the misery, and yes, also the compassion, the dignity, the courage, the forgiveness, all of it is detailed here in a way that is at once both decidedly personal and quite objective. The looming prospect of a no-deal Brexit and the potential that has for reigniting the conflict combines in my mind with the fond memories I have of my visit to Northern Ireland two years ago to leave me with a feeling of grave foreboding and also hope that the foundations of peace laid over two decades ago and built upon since will bear up under the pressure of today's political blundering. This is an important book for anyone interested in the cause of peace, and a must read for lovers of Ireland and the Irish people.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    I ended up skimming a lot of this because it's just so heartbreaking. I ended up skimming a lot of this because it's just so heartbreaking.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dblack

    Hard to know what to say - it never really leaves you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dominic Kearney

    Dispassionate, meticulous account of the Troubles, death by death. Unemotional, non-judgmental, yet full of sorrow.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Conor M

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tim

  11. 4 out of 5

    Chris Holmes

  12. 4 out of 5

    alec mccord

  13. 4 out of 5

    H. Michael Barrett

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nick Metcalfe

  15. 4 out of 5

    Seanmo

  16. 4 out of 5

    Petter

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Murray

  18. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Eastwood

  19. 4 out of 5

    Denise Malone

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rosa Reyes

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  22. 5 out of 5

    john mclaughlin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Gore

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  25. 4 out of 5

    debbie

  26. 4 out of 5

    Don

  27. 4 out of 5

    Carol Beaver

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  29. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paddy

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