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Originally published in Japan, this tale of the Dark Knight Detective provides a rare look at how a different culture interprets one of America's greatest heroes. Mixing the fastpaced, dark and violent aspects of Manga books with the legendary Batman mythos, this volume presents a unique storytelling experience. Featuring a story that includes the Joker, Two-Face, and the Originally published in Japan, this tale of the Dark Knight Detective provides a rare look at how a different culture interprets one of America's greatest heroes. Mixing the fastpaced, dark and violent aspects of Manga books with the legendary Batman mythos, this volume presents a unique storytelling experience. Featuring a story that includes the Joker, Two-Face, and the Riddler, as well as an illustrated guide to Batman's rogues gallery, this original graphic novel is a great opportunity to enjoy a new vision of a renowned character.


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Originally published in Japan, this tale of the Dark Knight Detective provides a rare look at how a different culture interprets one of America's greatest heroes. Mixing the fastpaced, dark and violent aspects of Manga books with the legendary Batman mythos, this volume presents a unique storytelling experience. Featuring a story that includes the Joker, Two-Face, and the Originally published in Japan, this tale of the Dark Knight Detective provides a rare look at how a different culture interprets one of America's greatest heroes. Mixing the fastpaced, dark and violent aspects of Manga books with the legendary Batman mythos, this volume presents a unique storytelling experience. Featuring a story that includes the Joker, Two-Face, and the Riddler, as well as an illustrated guide to Batman's rogues gallery, this original graphic novel is a great opportunity to enjoy a new vision of a renowned character.

30 review for Batman: Child of Dreams (Batman Beyond

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "They say each man is his 'own worst enemy' . . . and I am you, Batman . . . but younger . . . stronger . . . and out for blood!" -- the villain, who is also the Dark Knight's biggest fan Batman? More like Batmanga!!! (Silence only interrupted by crickets chirping.) Okay, then . . . Child of Dreams was one of those books that truly wants to live up to the phrase 'graphic novel.' At 300+ pages, the storyline seemed a bit overly drawn out towards the finale - the villain falls prey to critic Roger "They say each man is his 'own worst enemy' . . . and I am you, Batman . . . but younger . . . stronger . . . and out for blood!" -- the villain, who is also the Dark Knight's biggest fan Batman? More like Batmanga!!! (Silence only interrupted by crickets chirping.) Okay, then . . . Child of Dreams was one of those books that truly wants to live up to the phrase 'graphic novel.' At 300+ pages, the storyline seemed a bit overly drawn out towards the finale - the villain falls prey to critic Roger Ebert's trusty old 'fallacy of the talking killer' rule, prattling on about his knowledge and/or schemes - but the first half of it was reasonably good. The set-up contains the dual narratives of a visiting Japanese TV-news crew - including a untested young reporter who is quietly determined to prove her worth - attempting to obtain an interview with the elusive Batman, while said title hero is contending with genetically-enhanced versions of his longtime criminal opponents who are popping up on the streets of Gotham. There's not exactly much mystery in the story, but artist/author Asamiya's take on DC's crimefighter (assisted by novelist Max Allan Collins's translation of the dialogue - what a great choice!) offers a welcome and effective interpretation of the character.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    This was a rather interesting story. It is a Batman story in manga format and artstyle. Written by Kia Asamiya, this is the story of how a Tokyo reporter gets mixed up in a huge conspiracy to take out the current Batman and find his replacement. Without too much in the way of spoiers- Batman is forced to confront Two-Face, in order to save the Japanese reporter, and in the deadly encounter finds out that Two-Face is still in Arkham. This then occurs for other Batman villains, none of whom are the This was a rather interesting story. It is a Batman story in manga format and artstyle. Written by Kia Asamiya, this is the story of how a Tokyo reporter gets mixed up in a huge conspiracy to take out the current Batman and find his replacement. Without too much in the way of spoiers- Batman is forced to confront Two-Face, in order to save the Japanese reporter, and in the deadly encounter finds out that Two-Face is still in Arkham. This then occurs for other Batman villains, none of whom are the real one. So what's the deal? Batman's detective skills lead him to Tokyo, where with the help of the reporter (who is rather closely linked to this mess) he finds a complex plan to replicate a Batman. The story itself is not overly complex. In fact it is a rather pedestrian Batman story, but the manga style and artwork make this a unique experience. The "feeling" of the story is also more Japanese than the American Batman stories. This makes for an interesting outlook. I enjoyed the black and white, manga-style art and it works well for this tale. While nothing amazing, this was a fun comic and I appreciated the difference in style and art. This is one I'll be glad to add to my collection.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Garrett

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.5/5 Two-Face, Riddler, Penguin, and Joker have all been spotted around Gotham, only it's not actually them, its people pretending to be them and they resemble them well, with one exception- they are all drug addicted and they are dying, and once they are dead the bodies degrade and mummify. All of these impersonators end up getting killed and Batman is lead to Tokyo to try and find out who is manufacturing this drug called "fanatic". It turns out, it's a Japanese billionaire just like Bruce Way 3.5/5 Two-Face, Riddler, Penguin, and Joker have all been spotted around Gotham, only it's not actually them, its people pretending to be them and they resemble them well, with one exception- they are all drug addicted and they are dying, and once they are dead the bodies degrade and mummify. All of these impersonators end up getting killed and Batman is lead to Tokyo to try and find out who is manufacturing this drug called "fanatic". It turns out, it's a Japanese billionaire just like Bruce Wayne, named Kenji Tomioka. He owns a pharmaceutical company and has an obsession with Batman and knows that Bruce Wayne is Batman. This drug called "fanatic" is a DNA altering drug similar to the splicers in Batman Beyond. It fuses your DNA with the DNA of someone else. Tomioka ends up injecting himself with the drug, which has Bruce Wayne's DNA in it and he becomes an armored Batman himself. They fight and he dies, by accidentally getting to many injections. The problem with the story? It's a little to over the top even for a Batman comic. There is fantastic art through out that reminds me of Takeshi Obata's art on Death Note. (Jim Gordon looks exactly like Chief Yagami). Although it has a lot of exciting moments, the writing is not great, but I think it is still worth the read. Tomioka was an interesting foil to Bruce Wayne but there are a few plot holes in the book. It never really answers why the bodies were being mummified in the beginning, not to mention the book is a little long.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Not a fan of Manga Batman

  5. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Lopez

    Kia Asamyia’s Batman: Child of Dreams is the perfect fusion of Japanese and Western comic styles. Historically, my biggest trouble with manga has been the absurd cartoonish styles, and how each volume only captures a small portion of a wider story arc. Most of my books I get from libraries, so with Japanese comics I’m only likely to be able to read one or two volumes from each series. This often means that I’m parachuted into a story without any understanding of previous events, and that the volu Kia Asamyia’s Batman: Child of Dreams is the perfect fusion of Japanese and Western comic styles. Historically, my biggest trouble with manga has been the absurd cartoonish styles, and how each volume only captures a small portion of a wider story arc. Most of my books I get from libraries, so with Japanese comics I’m only likely to be able to read one or two volumes from each series. This often means that I’m parachuted into a story without any understanding of previous events, and that the volume will end before the story reaches any sort of satisfactory conclusion. This problem is much rarer with Western comics. With a Superman or Asterix comic, you can feel well assured that the protagonist will have their major problem resolved by the time finish the book. Western comics also have the advantage of being about iconic characters. While small details will vary across multiple continuities, you are never going to be wondering why Superman can fly or why Batman does what he does. So when I say that Batman: Child of Dreams combines the best elements of both traditions, I mean that is manga with a self-contained narrative featuring characters I recognize. It is also a manga blown up to the proportions of an American graphic novel, which is definitely a novelty. The art has also been flipped, and the sound effects have also been translated. Besides the Japanese name of the author, the cover gives no real hint that this book is a manga. The story is also good. It’s about a Japanese reporter who goes over to America to investigate The Batman himself, and gets caught up in wacky Bat-jinks. A new drug has hit the streets of Gotham, and it turns some people into Batman villains! The major theme of Batman: Child of Dreams is how fannish devotion can go dark, and even hurt the object of adoration. If you see this book, read it. It’s good. Especially recommended for Bat-fans and those who like manga.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Batman: Child of Dreams is a manga series written and illustrated by Kia Asamiya and translated by Max Allan Collins. The series follows Batman as he travels to Tokyo on the trail of a lethal drug that allows the person who ingests it to shape-shift into anyone they desire. It features Bruce Wayne as Batman in Gotham City and Tokyo, locating the source of a deadly drug. This drug provides the users with the thrill of literally living the life of their dreams for a day, by forcing the user to shap Batman: Child of Dreams is a manga series written and illustrated by Kia Asamiya and translated by Max Allan Collins. The series follows Batman as he travels to Tokyo on the trail of a lethal drug that allows the person who ingests it to shape-shift into anyone they desire. It features Bruce Wayne as Batman in Gotham City and Tokyo, locating the source of a deadly drug. This drug provides the users with the thrill of literally living the life of their dreams for a day, by forcing the user to shape-shift into the person they desire to be. After the day expires, the drug kills the user by draining them of their life force. Most of the users in Gotham turned into literal copies of several Batman villains. Batman suspected they were not the real thing after they seemed to sport twisted forms of their regular traits. Realizing a larger force is at work, Batman, with the help of Japanese journalist Yuuko Yagi, follows the trail of the chemical to Tokyo, where he finds the deranged criminal mastermind behind the creation of the infamous drug is none other than a heavily mutated fan. Batman: Child of Dreams is written and constructed moderately well. Kia Asamiya does an admirable job writing a Japanese Batman story that fits with the mythos and atmosphere of a typical Batman story. However, while the narrative was rather entertaining, it was rather predictable – it was a straightforward detective story. Asamiya's style of drawing was rather interesting, but his tendency for huge noses and extremely tiny eyes was rather disconcerting, but his villains are done rather well. This is a nice, safe story, and doesn't play too much with continuity or really examine its characters. As an aside, my reading this manga was a tad difficult for me as everything was flipped in the translated version – most noticeably with Two-Face's face as the scarred face was on the wrong side. Japanese manga is typically read from right to left – opposite to how the English world reads. However, my brain is used to read manga in the traditional style, so my eyes would automatically go to the upper-right corner to start the reading, but have to correct myself – every single time I start a new page – it was exasperating. All in all, Batman: Child of Dreams is a mediocre comic/magna with an interesting, but safe and predictable story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Rumbell

    It was an interesting idea and the story gets there fairly well, but I generally take issue with the lead female character. It might be that this is translated from Japanese and there are just some cultural presentation things going on that I can't appreciate but she often seemed a means to an end exclusively. She had an arc and it had an interesting end, but there was something about it that felt unexplored. Otherwise, this was a decent international detective story for Batman. Chasing down a co It was an interesting idea and the story gets there fairly well, but I generally take issue with the lead female character. It might be that this is translated from Japanese and there are just some cultural presentation things going on that I can't appreciate but she often seemed a means to an end exclusively. She had an arc and it had an interesting end, but there was something about it that felt unexplored. Otherwise, this was a decent international detective story for Batman. Chasing down a collection of what seem to be his oldest enemies and tracking the drugs that are letting ordinary people become those villains before overdosing. The entire comic is in black and white which takes a moment to get used to, but probably does more for the story because there is less to get distracted by in terms of flash. Worth a look, but don't chase it down.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Christian

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'd read a large bit of "Batman: Child of Dreams" a few years back. Suddenly entering a Batman-frenzy, I remembered the "manga thing" and decided to track it down - the artwork was exactly as I recalled it, the style reminding me of a certain Japanese artist whose name I cannot recall, but every nose and every jawline is the same - exactly the same. This shouldn't necessarily be a problem, but when Batman fights an imposter-Batman and proclaims "he doesn't have my features!", I took a really good I'd read a large bit of "Batman: Child of Dreams" a few years back. Suddenly entering a Batman-frenzy, I remembered the "manga thing" and decided to track it down - the artwork was exactly as I recalled it, the style reminding me of a certain Japanese artist whose name I cannot recall, but every nose and every jawline is the same - exactly the same. This shouldn't necessarily be a problem, but when Batman fights an imposter-Batman and proclaims "he doesn't have my features!", I took a really good look at the panel of them facing off, and I could not spot the actual Bruce Wayne. The jaws, the nose, exactly the same features! Now, that's a stylistic thing, and it works well enough in some cases - the Joker appeals very much to me, in the Japanese style, his oversized grin fits the facial shape very well, overall he was very enjoyable to look at, in my opinion. People mention the noses a lot - this didn't really bother me, I admit, as much as did the general same-ness of the characters' looks - the style doesn't annoy me, in and of itself, only the problems the specific artist seems to have with seperating Batman from Fake-Batman etc. The comic has other obvious problems, however, such as a Japanese Catwoman-imposter. If this girl is Japanese, why is Batman, the world's greatest detective, fooled for even a moment? Should she not be shorter, her eyes asian-looking (the suit is a traditional Catwoman suit, that is, without goggles), her accent imperfect (established she speaks good English, but fooling the Dark Knight himself?), her very voice pattern in a different pitch? How can that escape Batman for even a second? The plot is farfetched at best, and Batman suddenly going to Japan, leaving Gotham behind, seems insane in any Batman-continuity - mind you, he's making no calls to Robin, Nightwing or whatever before leaving. Apparently, Gotham's Dark Knight just ups and offs. The romance story is weak and badly written at least, worse than usual, even. The way Bruce tries to defend the Batman's actions, the way they both interact with the same girl, it seems utterly ridiculous that she, as a reporter, hasn't guessed and figured out, that Bruce and Batman are one and the same. I had thought the manga-style would convey the usually powerful scenes of Batman very well, the high speed action that Japanese comics usually capture fantastically. However, half the time, I just couldn't figure out what was going on - admittedly, I didn't exactly study the panels when the feeling arose, but being black and white, and keeping the Gotham-dark-mood, made a lot of stuff very indeciperable - black shades and shapes moving around each other, with random, unidentifiable sound effects. Don't get me wrong, the artwork is generally stunning, certainly better than anything I could do, and when it doesn't disappear into black-and-white pseudo noir chaos, everything looks great - movement, action, cars, cityscapes, really well drawn, care and attention to detail. Worth mention is the flipping of all the pages, from Japanese to "Western" reading style, which means that Two-Face is reversed. That's just subtly annoying. The sound effects seem rather random, chaotic and halfway annoying to me - but a lot of them can be given down to the style, manga, which has a tendency to use a lot of sound effects - it just seems disruptive to me here, and certainly doesn't help aforementioned combat scenes. The plot. Oh God, don't get me started with the plot. It's not particularly complex, really - a Japanese medical company owner is fanatically obsessed with the idea of obtaining Bruce Wayne for his Batman-collection (will explain in a moment) - so he decides to pit Batman against fake editions of his rogues gallery, produced by inducing them with a new super-drug - which, yes, can transform you physically, into what you want. That was just too much suspension of disbelief. And if you're gonna bring about the rogues gallery, where is my Scarecrow? That could have worked so well, I'm certain of it. Anyway, he (medical baddie) sends his tv reporter niece (Yuko Yagi, couldn't have come up with a more annoying Japanese name if I'd tried) to Gotham to interview Batman, with a team of related people. The director turns out to be utterly insane, ends up impersonating Batman, fighting Batman and dying. Yea - what the hell? Eventually, as mentioned, Batman leaves Gotham to go Japan, taking no mentioned precautions against the villains plaguing it. Wrapping it up, he fights the medical guy, who is now some kind of super-mecha Japanese Batman, in a battle of truly stupid proportions. I have to mention how he finds out the connection between Wayne and Batman too, before this wrathfest is over - Yuko is attacked, Batman saves her and brings her to the Batcave. He could have done a lot of other stuff, but he decides to bring her, a reporter, to his innermost sanctum - and then, Uncle Badguy's goons simply track her minicam. That's right, according to Asamiya, Batman has no signal scramblers in the cave. You can just send out a signal. And when the cave is under Wayne Manor, stuff seems obvious. What the...that was just...that was so very, very, very bad. Yuko herself is the most unlikeable, idiotic character I've ever read about. She is supposed to be a grown woman, but has a weird Batman-fetish (okay, not Frank Miller-weird, but still), talks to stuffed animals when alone, she connects no dots whatsoever (impressive for a reporter) and she has a dull, annoying love...thing with Bruce. In the end, I had to fight through the last 100 pages. A very good try, but at the end, a complete miss. It's not very good as manga, it's not very good as Batman; in conclusion, it's just not very good.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Derek DeMars

    Manga Batman was pretty good! Great artwork, decent story. The dialogue was pretty melodramatic (though that's par for the course with the genre), but there were some clever moments. An entertaining one-off Bat-story. Manga Batman was pretty good! Great artwork, decent story. The dialogue was pretty melodramatic (though that's par for the course with the genre), but there were some clever moments. An entertaining one-off Bat-story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Phino DeLeon

    Not a great story, predictable to say the least, but the illustrations were very good

  11. 5 out of 5

    Roshan Tiwari

    Nice fusion of manga and comics. Nice art and excellent storyline.

  12. 4 out of 5

    B.C.

    i liked the premise, but the narration started to bug me by the end. It might be a style thing though as this was really driven by manga.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    Loved the intrigue and action of the first half, but the second half was more obvious and heavy-handed in its storytelling.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Excellent imagining of the Dark Knight tusing the influence of Japanese Manga.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Smith

    Really good, with a great villain, and it's written well. Really good, with a great villain, and it's written well.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brannigan

    Manga Batman. I didn’t like it.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dimosu

    This book is totally cool.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Monean

    The comic book is hands down fabulous!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    "There's a drug on the streets of Gotham that will make the user's dreams come true. For a minute, for an hour, for a whole night if that person's lucky, he/she can become one of Batman's greatest enemies. It's up to Batman to find the supplier for this surreal and deadly drug, and the search takes him to Tokyo, for a confrontation with the ultimate chemically enhanced enemy." I was glad to find gem at a local comic shop, as it's been out-of-print for a while. This Batman à la japonnaise was a ve "There's a drug on the streets of Gotham that will make the user's dreams come true. For a minute, for an hour, for a whole night if that person's lucky, he/she can become one of Batman's greatest enemies. It's up to Batman to find the supplier for this surreal and deadly drug, and the search takes him to Tokyo, for a confrontation with the ultimate chemically enhanced enemy." I was glad to find gem at a local comic shop, as it's been out-of-print for a while. This Batman à la japonnaise was a very good idea. It's certainly distinctive enough. Are there many Batman mangas (Batmangas?) out there? The plot is not ground-breaking, granted, but definitely of Japanese flavour, and that's what I liked about this book: it's something new & different, Batman like I'd never seen him before. It reminded me of those Japanese cartoons I used to watch as a boy... Batman himself, in particular, reminded me a lot of Zoltar, a villain from Battle Of The Planets a 70's cartoon. Also, absolutely everyone has a big shnozz! Uncanny! The art's in black & white, which is rare for a Batman story (even considering Batman Black and White, Vol. 1, vol. 2, and Vol. 3), and it was translated from the Japanese by novelist and comics writer Max Allan Collins (Road to Perdition), if that interests you. A lot of people have tried to do something different with Batman, but few, if any, have done as good a job as Kia Asamiya has with "Child Of Dreams". If you can find it, it's worth at least a read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tyler Hill

    The art deserves at least three stars, but the overlong and plodding storyline drags the whole affair down and made getting to the end seem like more of a chore than it should have. Some of that plodding was probably a result of the fact that the story was originally told as a serial, and -I imagine- there is a bit of padding and recapping that comes with the format. Still, too much of the story's direction was too apparent too early, which undermined the drama and suspense. It also doesn't help The art deserves at least three stars, but the overlong and plodding storyline drags the whole affair down and made getting to the end seem like more of a chore than it should have. Some of that plodding was probably a result of the fact that the story was originally told as a serial, and -I imagine- there is a bit of padding and recapping that comes with the format. Still, too much of the story's direction was too apparent too early, which undermined the drama and suspense. It also doesn't help that the final confrontation between Batman and the bad guy boils down to them just repeating this to each other for something like 20 pages: Batman: "You're a perversion! A monster!" Bad guy: "You're weak! It's embarrassing! You deserve to be killed!" (Repeat) Max Allen Collins provides translations, I believe, but I can only hope for his sake, that the verbose and, frankly, cheesy narration is Kia Asamiya's fault, not his. Because, man, eye-rolling. As far as Asamiya's art goes, it's stunning overall. I'm really only familiar with his work from the handful of Uncanny X-Men issues he did before being chased off by xenophobic fanboys who couldn't cope with the X-men being drawn in a manga style. Personally, I was too busy being annoyed at Chuck Austin's awful writing during that period to notice much about his art beyond his tendency toward giant beak-like noses on male characters. The big noses are still there, but he provides a lot more to appreciate this time around. Namely, his depiction of Gotham and Tokyo are both gorgeous. And, Batman's home city has rarely looked more brooding and stunning. Overall, unless you are a fan on Asamiya's art, or a hardcore Bat-fan, I'm not sure there is a ton to recommend here. There's definitely better Bat-stories, or -at least- more succinct ones.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rob McMonigal

    Batman, aging gracefully, faces off against mysterious clones of his rogue's gallery, ranging from Two-Face to the Joker. Meanwhile, a young Japanese reporter wants to interview him, and has the backing of her mysterious uncle, a powerful man in the pharmaceutical lines. When a fake Joker starts handing out pills, Bats puts two and two together and heads to Japan where he must face off against his own worst enemy--himself! While this all sounds like a good plot line, it's bogged down in a romanc Batman, aging gracefully, faces off against mysterious clones of his rogue's gallery, ranging from Two-Face to the Joker. Meanwhile, a young Japanese reporter wants to interview him, and has the backing of her mysterious uncle, a powerful man in the pharmaceutical lines. When a fake Joker starts handing out pills, Bats puts two and two together and heads to Japan where he must face off against his own worst enemy--himself! While this all sounds like a good plot line, it's bogged down in a romance that makes no sense because it's given a level of seriousness usually reserved only for Catwoman or Wonder Woman. In addition, it's marred by some really bad manga art. The noses make everyone look like the Penguin! I'm also not impressed by the idea that Bats would go after the villain without a better plan in place--the ending is rather abrupt and doesn't leave me satisfied. All in all, neither Marvel nor DC's attempts at straight manga have impressed me. (Library, 01/07) Trebby's Take: Maybe a hard-core manga fan might like this better than me, but I doubt it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Justyn Rampa

    Nearly 350 pages later, I can say that I very much enjoyed this Batmanga tale. The concept was ridiculously creative, the artwork was very well done, and both were done by the same man which is impressive. Kia Asamiya has become the first Japanese comic artist to work on Batman and you can tell from the story that he is very much a fan. The translation was done by Max Allan Collins, the man who took over for Chester Gould on Dick Tracy for 15 years, and he did a fantastic job in translation. The l Nearly 350 pages later, I can say that I very much enjoyed this Batmanga tale. The concept was ridiculously creative, the artwork was very well done, and both were done by the same man which is impressive. Kia Asamiya has become the first Japanese comic artist to work on Batman and you can tell from the story that he is very much a fan. The translation was done by Max Allan Collins, the man who took over for Chester Gould on Dick Tracy for 15 years, and he did a fantastic job in translation. The length was a bit daunting, but overall worth it. To explain anything about the plot would be to spoil it, so I won't go into details. I don't believe I will be adding this to my list but the only reason for that is because I didn't LOVE it. I respected it, enjoyed it, and it certainly was an indication of the universality of Batman.

  23. 5 out of 5

    M

    In this tale by Japanese artist Kia Asamiya, things are not always as they seem. After battles with famous Gotham rogues, Batman notices that the villains are demonstrating strange looks and behaviors. An investigation into the oddity yields a designer drug from Japan. Able to allow someone to literally live out their dream, this narcotic transforms citizens into their greatest desire - only to kill them upon the end of the drug's course. The Dark Knight must head to the Orient to confront his b In this tale by Japanese artist Kia Asamiya, things are not always as they seem. After battles with famous Gotham rogues, Batman notices that the villains are demonstrating strange looks and behaviors. An investigation into the oddity yields a designer drug from Japan. Able to allow someone to literally live out their dream, this narcotic transforms citizens into their greatest desire - only to kill them upon the end of the drug's course. The Dark Knight must head to the Orient to confront his biggest "fan" and put an end to the vicious pretenders walking his streets. Asamiya's art is unique, providing an entertaining visual tour through the world of Batman; lose some sleep with this dreamy tale.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Beckiezra

    I couldn't get through this, it just wasn't holding my attention. The art wasn't a style I particularly liked but it was fine, except I think they'd reversed it from it's Japanese printing. Two-face having his face backwards kind of started my dislike. I just didn't care for where the story was going, or maybe more specifically I couldn't be bothered to care about the new main guest reporter character. Things I like about manga I apparently do not like mixed in with my Batman, but I don't know if I couldn't get through this, it just wasn't holding my attention. The art wasn't a style I particularly liked but it was fine, except I think they'd reversed it from it's Japanese printing. Two-face having his face backwards kind of started my dislike. I just didn't care for where the story was going, or maybe more specifically I couldn't be bothered to care about the new main guest reporter character. Things I like about manga I apparently do not like mixed in with my Batman, but I don't know if it was just my mood or an actual failing in the book. I've still got it from the library for another week so I may try to get through some more. It may just be a matter of me liking Robins more than Batman alone.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I used to love comic books an the like when I was much younger and with Hollywood's interpretations of most of my childhood heroes I guess things would come full circle some day!! I am not a big reader of graphic novels on fact other than Maus this is my first...I found this at a charity shop and was curious enough to pick it up..ultimately I'm glad I did. I understand this was Batmans first foray into the Manga form..since this there could have been others I have no idea however the art is good a I used to love comic books an the like when I was much younger and with Hollywood's interpretations of most of my childhood heroes I guess things would come full circle some day!! I am not a big reader of graphic novels on fact other than Maus this is my first...I found this at a charity shop and was curious enough to pick it up..ultimately I'm glad I did. I understand this was Batmans first foray into the Manga form..since this there could have been others I have no idea however the art is good and blends both an American and Japanese feel well. The plot itself built to a fun finish which I won't spoil..classic villains are also present..or are they?...maybe you will have to read to find out..a quick but fun read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    This was a strange comic. In fact, it was a story that didn't feel cohesive in the slightest, and the portrayal of some of the characters felt very off putting. There's typos, the plot feels lacking and the whole 'drug' concept was such a cop out half the time that I struggled to give a crap. One thing I will admit to though is that the artwork is stunning! Very, very pretty. I also adored the whole look of the characters, especially the robo-Batman! This was a strange comic. In fact, it was a story that didn't feel cohesive in the slightest, and the portrayal of some of the characters felt very off putting. There's typos, the plot feels lacking and the whole 'drug' concept was such a cop out half the time that I struggled to give a crap. One thing I will admit to though is that the artwork is stunning! Very, very pretty. I also adored the whole look of the characters, especially the robo-Batman!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    This is surprisingly good, with a very clever storyline. A Japanese reporter comes to Gotham for an interview with Batman, at the same time all his old foes start appearing. This is illustrated in black and white, totally the manga style. Don't let this put you off, the artwork is outstanding and really helps to tell the story. It's flipped (from the manga original) but that should not put purists off from reading this. A very good read. This is surprisingly good, with a very clever storyline. A Japanese reporter comes to Gotham for an interview with Batman, at the same time all his old foes start appearing. This is illustrated in black and white, totally the manga style. Don't let this put you off, the artwork is outstanding and really helps to tell the story. It's flipped (from the manga original) but that should not put purists off from reading this. A very good read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Finda

    I'm a BIG FAN of Batman, this book's reveal's Batman from the other side , written nicely by Kia Asamiya ...manga creator from Japan ....combining two style>> manga and US Comics....... nice Book's.... I'm a BIG FAN of Batman, this book's reveal's Batman from the other side , written nicely by Kia Asamiya ...manga creator from Japan ....combining two style>> manga and US Comics....... nice Book's....

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A manga Batman, re-scripted by Max Allan Collins and far better than his Road to Perdition. Has a better excuse than these stories normally manage for bringing in all the classic villains, and some really astonishing cityscapes.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Iori

    the art is fantastic the story good .

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