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At the turning point of the Dominion War, Captain Benjamin Sisko of Starbase "Deep Space 9" (TM), facing certain defeat by the relentless forces of the Jem'Hadar and the Cardassians, went through with a secret plan to secure the aid of the Federation's longtime adversaries, the Romulans. What began as a desperate attempt to save lives became a descent into an abyss of dece At the turning point of the Dominion War, Captain Benjamin Sisko of Starbase "Deep Space 9" (TM), facing certain defeat by the relentless forces of the Jem'Hadar and the Cardassians, went through with a secret plan to secure the aid of the Federation's longtime adversaries, the Romulans. What began as a desperate attempt to save lives became a descent into an abyss of deception, moral compromises, and outright criminal acts, as Sisko sacrificed every ideal he held dear in order to preserve the civilization that espoused those selfsame principles.Now the aftermath of that choice is revealed for the first time as Sisko is summoned to Earth to take part in the first Allied talks to come out of the Federation's new partnership with the Romulans. But Sisko's conscience weighs heavily on him, compelling him to seek some kind of penance for what he has done...while elements within Starfleet itself set in motiona scheme to use Elim Garak as a pawn against a human political dissident who may hold the key to the outcome of the war. HOLLOW MEN A TALE OF THE DOMINION WAR


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At the turning point of the Dominion War, Captain Benjamin Sisko of Starbase "Deep Space 9" (TM), facing certain defeat by the relentless forces of the Jem'Hadar and the Cardassians, went through with a secret plan to secure the aid of the Federation's longtime adversaries, the Romulans. What began as a desperate attempt to save lives became a descent into an abyss of dece At the turning point of the Dominion War, Captain Benjamin Sisko of Starbase "Deep Space 9" (TM), facing certain defeat by the relentless forces of the Jem'Hadar and the Cardassians, went through with a secret plan to secure the aid of the Federation's longtime adversaries, the Romulans. What began as a desperate attempt to save lives became a descent into an abyss of deception, moral compromises, and outright criminal acts, as Sisko sacrificed every ideal he held dear in order to preserve the civilization that espoused those selfsame principles.Now the aftermath of that choice is revealed for the first time as Sisko is summoned to Earth to take part in the first Allied talks to come out of the Federation's new partnership with the Romulans. But Sisko's conscience weighs heavily on him, compelling him to seek some kind of penance for what he has done...while elements within Starfleet itself set in motiona scheme to use Elim Garak as a pawn against a human political dissident who may hold the key to the outcome of the war. HOLLOW MEN A TALE OF THE DOMINION WAR

30 review for Hollow Men

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nicky2910

    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Hollow Men by Una McCormack This novel is set after "In the Pale Moonlight".   Sisko and Garak travel to Earth for a conference of the allied forces. While Sisko's struggling with his role in bringing the Romulans into the war, Garak is debriefed by apparent Intelligence officers and tasked with making a former Starfleet officer and colleague of Sisko's, now turned into prime fighter for the peace/isolationist movement, disappear. Meanwhile, the station is lending help Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Hollow Men by Una McCormack This novel is set after "In the Pale Moonlight".   Sisko and Garak travel to Earth for a conference of the allied forces. While Sisko's struggling with his role in bringing the Romulans into the war, Garak is debriefed by apparent Intelligence officers and tasked with making a former Starfleet officer and colleague of Sisko's, now turned into prime fighter for the peace/isolationist movement, disappear. Meanwhile, the station is lending help to a ship transporting liquid latinum while a former acquaintance of Odo's, whom he sent to prison, surprisingly reappears just at that moment. But Odo doesn't believe in coincidences and, at Dax's request, enlists Bashir's help, who's quite moody after his return from a "medical" conference, in trying to solve the puzzle.   While this novel shows the aftermath of one of my favourite DS9 episodes with Sisko looking for absolution at every corner (and not getting it until he reconciles himself with his actions and rediscovering his limits), this novel isn't quite as engaging as I would have hoped for. The conference part is more or less skimmed over, which is a shame, as I would have loved to see more of that. The focus, though, firmly lies on Garak - which isn't a bad thing necessarily. And his confronting Earth's democracy, hearing contrary opinions voiced right outside the conference site, learning that the lists of war-victims are published uncensored, himself being allowed to roam more or less freely on Earth (albeit with an escort), facing SI's attempts at interrogation etc. is frankly hilarious, the best way to get a glimpse at Cardassian society, I guess. Until it's not all fun anymore, and he's confronted with an organization that might be rather similar to his own Obsidian Order.   And that leads us to Tomas Roeder, the leader of the peace movement and Garak's target. That's perhaps the second point of criticism that his motivations remain in the dark. He's a tool to advance the plot, nothing more. Any mention of a prior relationship with Sisko is unnecessary - because it's a non-issue in the end.   And honestly, I'd have wished for less of the plot on the station: Granted, it gave us a glimpse into Bashir after his first confrontation with Section 31, and Odo who's close to being obsessed, but never crossing the line (which makes for an interesting discussion between those two, especially in regards to "Inquisition"). And everyone's trying to get Kira and Odo together. So, it fits nicely into continuity, but I'd rather have had the focus on Sisko and Garak and Earth.   The plotthreads only come together in the final pages, hinting at what is to befall the Founders, and I realize of course that there can't be a solution then and there - because then season 7 likely would never have happened... And while I truely appreciate all the little hints and realizations, especially Garak and Odo's who perhaps are the only ones to smell something bigger going on, something hidden and sinister (with Odo going through a repeat performance of the transformation-inhibitor-debacle Garak's put him through in "Improbable Cause"/"The Die Is Cast"), the path to getting to those realizations is a bit rocky and lacking in surprises and suspense.   Overall, good novel, first-class characterization (especially Garak, Sisko and Odo), little moments that would have been well worth exploring, but ultimately nothing really outstanding.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Maya Dworsky-Rocha

    Excellent Garak content. Acceptable Quark and Bashir characterization. Questionable Odo rendering. 404 Kira and Worf Not Found. Utter betrayal of the underlying nuance which makes Sisko the best Starfleet Captain. Dax is also there. It's fun to see Garak react to Earth (swans are weird) and the Federation (where are the adults?) but Sisko looking for absolution was unrealistically self-indulgent. Also, everyone needs to stop punching Garak. Like stat. Excellent Garak content. Acceptable Quark and Bashir characterization. Questionable Odo rendering. 404 Kira and Worf Not Found. Utter betrayal of the underlying nuance which makes Sisko the best Starfleet Captain. Dax is also there. It's fun to see Garak react to Earth (swans are weird) and the Federation (where are the adults?) but Sisko looking for absolution was unrealistically self-indulgent. Also, everyone needs to stop punching Garak. Like stat.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    This intriguing tale takes place almost directly after the infamous DS9 episode 'In The Pale Moonlight', and deals with the aftermath. Despite being written many years later, it fits in perfectly with the show's storylines at that point. While the story could perhaps be accused of being a bit slow, it's an extremely enticing read. What struck me most of all is how well the author captured the characters; it's easy to imagine every line of dialogue being delivered by the cast of the show, and the This intriguing tale takes place almost directly after the infamous DS9 episode 'In The Pale Moonlight', and deals with the aftermath. Despite being written many years later, it fits in perfectly with the show's storylines at that point. While the story could perhaps be accused of being a bit slow, it's an extremely enticing read. What struck me most of all is how well the author captured the characters; it's easy to imagine every line of dialogue being delivered by the cast of the show, and the depictions are all very true to the characters on the show. It's a very internal story, dealing largely with Sisko's state of mind as he comes to terms with what he did in the the episode the story is based around. I found the ending to be a bit of a let down with a few too many unexplained things and a lack of genuine closure, but I found myself engrossed all along the way. I also kind of appreciate that the book allows you to piece things together yourself rather than explaining. I'm really looking forward to reading the other stories by this author, especially if they feature Garak.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    The characterization in the book was superb. Garak's dialogue especially was spot on, and often had me laughing at his quick and subtle wit. One thing this book did really well was show characters dealing with things that happened in episodes set prior in a more fleshed out way than the series did. The main plot was fantastic, but I also really liked the subplot with Bashir. As I said above, Garak really shines in this book. He's smart and savvy, and working towards his own ends as usual. This bo The characterization in the book was superb. Garak's dialogue especially was spot on, and often had me laughing at his quick and subtle wit. One thing this book did really well was show characters dealing with things that happened in episodes set prior in a more fleshed out way than the series did. The main plot was fantastic, but I also really liked the subplot with Bashir. As I said above, Garak really shines in this book. He's smart and savvy, and working towards his own ends as usual. This book is worth reading for that alone, though I also like the focus on Sisko's guilt after In the Pale Moonlight, and Bashir's feelings after Inter Arma Enim Silent Leges (especially showing his friends' attempts to cheer him up.) Setting the book on Earth also leads to some interesting (and hilarious) insights at what an outsider would think of commonplace things here. Garak's response to Sisko's suggestion of feeding the birds, for example. I definitely want to read more by this author, if this is the quality of work I can expect!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Kukwa

    The best DS9 novel I have ever read...and one of the best Star Trek novels in general. Una McCormack manages to weave a story into the very heart of the Dominion War...a story that hangs astonishing character development onto a serviceable plot. I have rarely read such exquisite examinations of any of Star Trek's main characters as I have in this novel...particularly Sisko. As for Garak...this could be the best prose voice ever given to the plain-and-simple tailor. A sequel to a powerful episode The best DS9 novel I have ever read...and one of the best Star Trek novels in general. Una McCormack manages to weave a story into the very heart of the Dominion War...a story that hangs astonishing character development onto a serviceable plot. I have rarely read such exquisite examinations of any of Star Trek's main characters as I have in this novel...particularly Sisko. As for Garak...this could be the best prose voice ever given to the plain-and-simple tailor. A sequel to a powerful episode, a psychological study of searing intensity...and a heist caper that will have your mouth hanging open. A thoroughly fabulous book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nabil Hussain

    Unimpressive tale with few sci fi dramatic elements worth reading This book had only just one interesting sub-plot, this of the Hamexi. The rest of the book seemed to be boring, unappealing and downright tedious to follow. I was just able to finish the book as is my habit in reading but it wasn't a supremely pleasurable experience that I was expecting. I think, more could have been done with the story of this book,. This is one book I won't be rereading in the future. I have read better stuff asi Unimpressive tale with few sci fi dramatic elements worth reading This book had only just one interesting sub-plot, this of the Hamexi. The rest of the book seemed to be boring, unappealing and downright tedious to follow. I was just able to finish the book as is my habit in reading but it wasn't a supremely pleasurable experience that I was expecting. I think, more could have been done with the story of this book,. This is one book I won't be rereading in the future. I have read better stuff aside with this book from Una McCormack.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jae

    A direct follow-up to DS9 episode "In the Pale Moonlight", which itself may be the best episode in that series, or perhaps even in the franchise as a whole. Despite having that act to follow, it absolutely delivers. I was previously unfamiliar with McCormack's writing, but now look forward to checking out more of her work as this is one of the best ST books I have read. The A story follows captain Sisko and Garak at an allied conference on Earth, while the B story deals with the happenings on th A direct follow-up to DS9 episode "In the Pale Moonlight", which itself may be the best episode in that series, or perhaps even in the franchise as a whole. Despite having that act to follow, it absolutely delivers. I was previously unfamiliar with McCormack's writing, but now look forward to checking out more of her work as this is one of the best ST books I have read. The A story follows captain Sisko and Garak at an allied conference on Earth, while the B story deals with the happenings on the station while they are away. The only thing keeping this review from a 5 star rating is that the B story drags a bit. Otherwise it's fantastic - the characters' voices are pitch perfect, the story kept me guessing and I had a hard time putting it down.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Highly recommended for DS9 fans and especially for fans of Garrick. Una McCormack captures his voice so well. At times it seemed to meandor but proved to be a perfect novel in the end. It has a lot of great Star Trek preachy speeches about Democracy and Liberty.

  9. 5 out of 5

    sasha

    i'll read anything garak-centric. he is my number one dude. i'll read anything garak-centric. he is my number one dude.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    After wanting to read this book in May 2016 and then deciding not to until I'd watched a number of the episodes leading up to and surrounding it, I finally picked this book up again in January 2017. Elim Garak is most definitely one of my favourite Star Trek characters and Una McCormack does a superb job of writing him. This book's Garak is no cardboard cut-out but a real three-dimensional character. While reading a character's lines in the actor's voice and seeing the actor performing a certain After wanting to read this book in May 2016 and then deciding not to until I'd watched a number of the episodes leading up to and surrounding it, I finally picked this book up again in January 2017. Elim Garak is most definitely one of my favourite Star Trek characters and Una McCormack does a superb job of writing him. This book's Garak is no cardboard cut-out but a real three-dimensional character. While reading a character's lines in the actor's voice and seeing the actor performing a certain move or action when reading books based on TV shows is probably unavoidable, some Star Trek books have really made me doubt whether the writer ever watched a single episode of the show they were writing for. This book feels real - Sisko makes sense, Garak makes sense, Odo makes sense, Quark makes sense. The main plot - Sisko and Garak heading to earth for a conference - was nicely done. While I would have liked more details on the actual conference and less of Sisko's soul searching, I definitely enjoyed being in Garak's head. And really - who wouldn't like to know what a Romulan thinks of champagne... The sub plot - theft at the station - would have probably made more of an impact several years ago when "we'll throw the rules out the window because it's war" was a new thing, whereas nowadays, we've become almost numb to the grey areas and morally questionable decisions feel almost normal. All in all, I did very much enjoy this book, however don't think it will become one of my favourite DS9 books or one I'll want to read over and over.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    Deep Space Nine is notoriously the darkest of the six Star Trek series, repeatedly exploring corridors of the human experience that other series gave a wide berth. The horrors of war dominated the latter half of the series, and no character escaped the grim costs of war…especially not Captain Benjamin Sisko, who, in “In the Pale Moonlight” struck a Faustian bargain to save the Alpha Quadrant from outright conquest at the hands of the Dominion. What began as a devious exercise in manipulation end Deep Space Nine is notoriously the darkest of the six Star Trek series, repeatedly exploring corridors of the human experience that other series gave a wide berth. The horrors of war dominated the latter half of the series, and no character escaped the grim costs of war…especially not Captain Benjamin Sisko, who, in “In the Pale Moonlight” struck a Faustian bargain to save the Alpha Quadrant from outright conquest at the hands of the Dominion. What began as a devious exercise in manipulation ended in murder, twice over, with a succession of increasingly dubious steps connecting the two. Uma McCormack follows up on this most intriguing episode by exploring the consequences of Captain Sisko’s actions when he and his co-conspirator Garak are summoned to Starfleet Headquarters. Sisko, morally plagued, hopes for punishment and redemption; Garak anticipates savage treatment at the hands of Starfleet Intelligence, almost hopefully so – but neither man has any idea what is in store for them. Hollow Men is almost a creature from Trek literature’s previous generation in that it seems episodic; there’s a large A-story, and two smaller threads that connect together for a B story. The primary action takes place on Earth, where Sisko explores his conscience, and Garak, paradise. On the action, Odo deals with a security crisis and his thawing relationship with Colonel Kira. The two stories share a common theme, however; the cost of war. When an old nemesis of Odo arrives on the station, the constable is absolutely positive the recently-released convict is there to commit a latinum heist. New Federation security measures give him a lot of leeway in times of war, but is his personal satisfaction worth using such extreme measures? On Earth, both Sisko and Garak confront a Starfleet captain turned peace activist – but for their own reasons, and Garak’s are not his own, for powers on Earth attempt to convert him into a pawn in their own game. Deep Space Nine stands apart from the rest of the franchise not only for its darker themes, but its reliance on long-running arcs and rich characters. McCormack’s narrative definitely keeps with DS9’s tradition there; weaving the story’s threads seamlessly into Deep Space Nine’s sixth season – building on content from the show, or setting it up. All this she does and delivers two mysteries and a lot of room for thought. This is very much a keeper for Niners.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amber Colored Wolf

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I have wanted to read this book for almost a year and I was not disappointed. I would wager that if you asked any fan of Deep Space Nine to list their top ten episodes that "In the Pale Moonlight" would be on it. I would even hazard to say it would be in the top five. The story was just so gripping and different then what you usually see from Star Trek, but then again in my opinion that was the greatest things that both Garak and Quark brought to DS9 was that they represented a varied opinion. I I have wanted to read this book for almost a year and I was not disappointed. I would wager that if you asked any fan of Deep Space Nine to list their top ten episodes that "In the Pale Moonlight" would be on it. I would even hazard to say it would be in the top five. The story was just so gripping and different then what you usually see from Star Trek, but then again in my opinion that was the greatest things that both Garak and Quark brought to DS9 was that they represented a varied opinion. I love Starfleet, but it added something to the dynamic of the show to have these two characters that were so not the Starfleet way of thinking play such prominent roles. This book is what happens after the event in "In the Pale Moonlight" and I think closes the ideas behind that episode quite well. Really the running theme throughout this entire piece is what is a individual willing to do for war, for duty and at what point have you crossed a line that you can;t come back from. Sisko is confronted head on with all of these questions and you see him going back to reflect on various characters within Starfleet from earlier seasons that crossed that line and that were out-casted, punished for it. You see him trying to decide if he too should join them for what happened on his Station and you see him forgiven by a number of characters and told his actions were correct. By the end Sisko finally has to come to grips with what he did and decide if he can live with himself. An interesting counterpoint to this which I hadn't been expected was a whole side story about Bashir (who I adore so I was really pleased with this). We see one unanswered question from the show answered here that has always bothered me, which was how the war changed Julian, how he lost his innocence and how it really wasn't written as clearly as I would have liked to have seen. He learns an important lesson about justice from Odo which I really liked. And we also finally learn why Julian gave up his spy game program. My only real complainant which may not bother other people was I expected more Garak in this piece. Not that he isn't there, but a lot of his parts are told from Sisko's point of view being aggravated with my favorite Cardassian. I was hoping for more of Garak's inner thoughts, and that's the only reason this book didn't get all five stars. Really well written and interesting and a must read for any DS9 fan!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Hayes

    If you're a fan of DS9 and/or Garak, you're really going to like this. If this is your introduction to DS9, I don't think you'd really get the importance of what's going on. This book follows up a week or two after the episode "In the Pale Moonlight", and Sisko and Garak are called to Earth to contribute to a conference between the Klingons, Romulans, and Federation, as well as two member of the Cardassian government who escaped before their world was taken over by the Dominion. Author Una McCor If you're a fan of DS9 and/or Garak, you're really going to like this. If this is your introduction to DS9, I don't think you'd really get the importance of what's going on. This book follows up a week or two after the episode "In the Pale Moonlight", and Sisko and Garak are called to Earth to contribute to a conference between the Klingons, Romulans, and Federation, as well as two member of the Cardassian government who escaped before their world was taken over by the Dominion. Author Una McCormack has got Garak's dialogue and point of view down to a tee! You could hear Andrew Robinson's voice every time Garak spoke. The other half of the book deals with a supposed theft on the station and Odo is having problems figuring out who is going to do it and how. This part of the novel was very rote for me, and I didn't care for it. When this plot line was resolved I REALLY didn't care, as the mastermind behind the crime was one of the worst things/characters about DS9. Still, the Garak/Sisko scenes are so good, they more than made up for the mystery on the station. Worth reading.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Butch Rosenbalm

    As this book is to tell about Captain Sisko's issues from his deal to bring the Romulans into the Dominion War, I was really looking forward to it. However, like most DS9 books, when Garak is a character, the author shows just how much they love him. Garak completely overshadows the book, to it's detriment. An interesting new character Thomas Roeder, former Starfleet officer turn peacenik, is given little room to be interesting and turns downright uninteresting as the book comes to it's conclusi As this book is to tell about Captain Sisko's issues from his deal to bring the Romulans into the Dominion War, I was really looking forward to it. However, like most DS9 books, when Garak is a character, the author shows just how much they love him. Garak completely overshadows the book, to it's detriment. An interesting new character Thomas Roeder, former Starfleet officer turn peacenik, is given little room to be interesting and turns downright uninteresting as the book comes to it's conclusion. The "B" plot, dealing with some trying to steal some latinum is rather unrelated and I found it rather boring and unnecessary. Mind you, this book isn't bad. It's ok, gives most all the characters something to do and checks in on them. It just wasn't what I thought it was going to be given it's billed as the "In The Pale Moonlight" episode of DS9.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Highsmith

    I honestly quit reading it. Had alot of high hopes for this one. Got around to reading it. And it was kinda sluggish and slow. And I stopped with around 75 Pages to go. Garek's character seemed off at times. I doubt he is gonna let 2 Starfleet Officers take him for a stroll in a park while they ask him questions about Vreenak's killing. Could be wrong. But it doesn't sound right to me. The Anti War riot and Sisko and Garek running from it was downright hilarious. And it was good to see Adm. Leyt I honestly quit reading it. Had alot of high hopes for this one. Got around to reading it. And it was kinda sluggish and slow. And I stopped with around 75 Pages to go. Garek's character seemed off at times. I doubt he is gonna let 2 Starfleet Officers take him for a stroll in a park while they ask him questions about Vreenak's killing. Could be wrong. But it doesn't sound right to me. The Anti War riot and Sisko and Garek running from it was downright hilarious. And it was good to see Adm. Leyton who was another character that in the 23rd Century would've been someone admired rather than hated. Maybe Ill give it another shot down the road.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    A follow-up to the DS9 episode "In the Pale Moonlight" (which was, in my opinion, the best episode in the entire series)... In the end of the episode, Captain Sisko is haunted by the question of whether or not he can live with what he was done, and in a very haunting way, tries to convince himself that he can. This book shows that his living with what he has done is not as easy as he thought it might be. A follow-up to the DS9 episode "In the Pale Moonlight" (which was, in my opinion, the best episode in the entire series)... In the end of the episode, Captain Sisko is haunted by the question of whether or not he can live with what he was done, and in a very haunting way, tries to convince himself that he can. This book shows that his living with what he has done is not as easy as he thought it might be.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

    Strengths: It definitely captures the essences of the DS9 characters and a good follow-up to the episode "In the Pale of the Moonlight." It gets excellent marks for good ideas. Weaknesses: You really have to be familiar with what is going on the episodes in the last 2 seasons of DS9 to really appreciate the story. Otherwise, the story is a little disjointed. Fortunately, I'm at the same time watching the last 2 seasons of DS9 on DVD. Strengths: It definitely captures the essences of the DS9 characters and a good follow-up to the episode "In the Pale of the Moonlight." It gets excellent marks for good ideas. Weaknesses: You really have to be familiar with what is going on the episodes in the last 2 seasons of DS9 to really appreciate the story. Otherwise, the story is a little disjointed. Fortunately, I'm at the same time watching the last 2 seasons of DS9 on DVD.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    Set during the Dominion war, Sisko and Garak go to a conference on Earth. Meanwhile, Odo is trying to safeguard a shipment worth lots of money. I particularly liked the politics in this book, and the way Garak used them. This felt like Garak's story, a stranger on Earth who cant understand their customs and who doesn't want to be taken advantage of. The robbery plot is lighter in tone and quite amusing at times. It felt like it could have been a 2 part TV story. A very good read. Set during the Dominion war, Sisko and Garak go to a conference on Earth. Meanwhile, Odo is trying to safeguard a shipment worth lots of money. I particularly liked the politics in this book, and the way Garak used them. This felt like Garak's story, a stranger on Earth who cant understand their customs and who doesn't want to be taken advantage of. The robbery plot is lighter in tone and quite amusing at times. It felt like it could have been a 2 part TV story. A very good read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Una McCormack writes a deeply emotional novel about the aftermath of Sisko’s decision to bring the Romulans into the war against the Dominion by deceit, told in sixth season episode In the pale moonlight. This a fine portrait of Sisko, Garak, their similarities and differences. Published in mass market paperback by Pocket Books.

  20. 4 out of 5

    SmokingMirror

    The voices of the characters were dead on, something that cannot be counted on in media related books. Unfortunately, I didn't care about the mysterythe characters on the station were solving, and the action on Earth was too Sisko heavy for me. He is a character whose thoughts I wish would remain private. Well-written and commendable. Bridges a gap, though, rather than expanding a world. The voices of the characters were dead on, something that cannot be counted on in media related books. Unfortunately, I didn't care about the mysterythe characters on the station were solving, and the action on Earth was too Sisko heavy for me. He is a character whose thoughts I wish would remain private. Well-written and commendable. Bridges a gap, though, rather than expanding a world.

  21. 5 out of 5

    James

    Really enjoyable read and a great companion to one of the greatest star trek episode: In the pale moonlight (DS9). Get your read on for more Garak stories, the author really nails down the characters mannerisms well.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Excellent characterization, dialogue, and description. Suspenseful plot that twisted and turned and kept me hooked at every corner. I was quite confused by the implications of the ending however, although I may just need to think about it a while.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe Pranaitis

    I've read every Dominion War book that is out and this one just didn't have the punch that the others did but also considering that it's set before the Battle of Betazed. But it was still a good book and the author kept me intersted. I've read every Dominion War book that is out and this one just didn't have the punch that the others did but also considering that it's set before the Battle of Betazed. But it was still a good book and the author kept me intersted.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mikael Kuoppala

    An extremely well written and thought provoking book that reminds me in a very good way of Pat Barker's masterful Regeneration-trilogy. The novel's political ambiquity works most of the time, but at times I expected sharper commentary. An extremely well written and thought provoking book that reminds me in a very good way of Pat Barker's masterful Regeneration-trilogy. The novel's political ambiquity works most of the time, but at times I expected sharper commentary.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    Well-written and complex but perhaps need rather more than my own very passing familiarity with Star Trek DeepSpace Nine to appreciate fully.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Dodau

    Sisko and Garak go to a conference on earth during the war and get involved with peace protesters. Meanwhile back on the station Odo is trying to prevent the theft of a lot of latinum.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  28. 4 out of 5

    Josef

  29. 5 out of 5

    adele

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nyssa

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