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Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women's Hoops on the Map

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Raised on a cattle ranch, Agnes Morley was sent to Stanford University to learn to be a lady. Yet in no time she exchanged her breeches and spurs for bloomers and a basketball, and in April 1896 she made history. In a heart-pounding game against the University of California at Berkeley, Agnes led her team to victory in the first-ever intercollegiate women's basketball game Raised on a cattle ranch, Agnes Morley was sent to Stanford University to learn to be a lady. Yet in no time she exchanged her breeches and spurs for bloomers and a basketball, and in April 1896 she made history. In a heart-pounding game against the University of California at Berkeley, Agnes led her team to victory in the first-ever intercollegiate women's basketball game, bringing national attention to women's basketball.


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Raised on a cattle ranch, Agnes Morley was sent to Stanford University to learn to be a lady. Yet in no time she exchanged her breeches and spurs for bloomers and a basketball, and in April 1896 she made history. In a heart-pounding game against the University of California at Berkeley, Agnes led her team to victory in the first-ever intercollegiate women's basketball game Raised on a cattle ranch, Agnes Morley was sent to Stanford University to learn to be a lady. Yet in no time she exchanged her breeches and spurs for bloomers and a basketball, and in April 1896 she made history. In a heart-pounding game against the University of California at Berkeley, Agnes led her team to victory in the first-ever intercollegiate women's basketball game, bringing national attention to women's basketball.

30 review for Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women's Hoops on the Map

  1. 4 out of 5

    Debrarian

    Told from the POV of Agnes, center on the 1896 groundbreaking Stanford women's basketball team. (The first game ever between two women's college teams was between Stanford and Berkeley that year. No men were allowed in to watch women perspire, but 500 screaming women filled the stands!) There's a photo of the real team in the back, wearing what look like knitted wool bloomers and sweaters. Yoiks. Told from the POV of Agnes, center on the 1896 groundbreaking Stanford women's basketball team. (The first game ever between two women's college teams was between Stanford and Berkeley that year. No men were allowed in to watch women perspire, but 500 screaming women filled the stands!) There's a photo of the real team in the back, wearing what look like knitted wool bloomers and sweaters. Yoiks.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Waters

    This was a fun read for me since I am pretty unfamiliar with the history of women's basketball. The illustrations and narration of the story added to the authenticity of the time period. This was a fun read for me since I am pretty unfamiliar with the history of women's basketball. The illustrations and narration of the story added to the authenticity of the time period.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    The art and the text here work so well to really give you the feel of not just being at a basketball game but playing in one. I'm not even a sports person, but good sports writing and sports illustration are an art, and this one does it well. The art and the text here work so well to really give you the feel of not just being at a basketball game but playing in one. I'm not even a sports person, but good sports writing and sports illustration are an art, and this one does it well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Very informative. Uses the device of fiction, focusing on one individual to show a pivotal game in the history of women's basketball. Follows through with lots of info on the women portrayed, history of the sport, etc. One of those rare books that leaves the reader satisfied at the same as making him or her really want to pursue more information. I particularly am now interested in the memoir "No Life For a Lady" by the featured Stanford player Agnes Morley Cleaveland. Very informative. Uses the device of fiction, focusing on one individual to show a pivotal game in the history of women's basketball. Follows through with lots of info on the women portrayed, history of the sport, etc. One of those rare books that leaves the reader satisfied at the same as making him or her really want to pursue more information. I particularly am now interested in the memoir "No Life For a Lady" by the featured Stanford player Agnes Morley Cleaveland.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lexie Wosk

    Throughout my high school experience, one of my favorite sports to play was basketball. As a young athlete, this narrative nonfiction book immediately resonated with my experience not only as a former basketball player, but as a woman. Agnes Morley was one of the first women's basketball players. “Basketball Belles” is written to describe her experience and the impact she made towards influencing other women to play a sport that women once weren’t allowed to play. Agnes’ character not only is in Throughout my high school experience, one of my favorite sports to play was basketball. As a young athlete, this narrative nonfiction book immediately resonated with my experience not only as a former basketball player, but as a woman. Agnes Morley was one of the first women's basketball players. “Basketball Belles” is written to describe her experience and the impact she made towards influencing other women to play a sport that women once weren’t allowed to play. Agnes’ character not only is inspirational in the sense that she followed her dreams, but she did so in despite of what her mom thought of her. Agnes pursued what made her happy. Agnes went to Stanford, played basketball, and evolves through the story as a strong character that goes for what she desires. The way that the author illustrates women breaking barriers is such a great touch. I personally was told that not as many people went to my high school basketball games compared to the boys because it is “less intense”. But this book will otherwise tell the reader that women can easily break those barriers. I thought the narrative of the story was well-written with some informative insight along the way. This nonfiction story was nowhere near dry or dull to me. I actually found myself at the edge of my seat wondering who was going to win the game. The backmatter ultimately was my favorite part of this book. The list of years that describe new rules that were introduced throughout the centuries was so incredibly fascinating to me. It truly does show the reader the evolution of basketball. Overall, I thought this was a well written story to portray the history and experiences of women’s basketball.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Beth Wozencraft

    I found Basketball Belles looking at the 2012 Notable Social Studies Tradebook list on the National Council for the Social Studies website. I was intrigued by the description of this book so I decided to it. This book is the story of the first game played between two women’s college teams, Stanford and Berkley. It begins with a brief background on women’s basketball and the rules for women. It then goes on to describe the game. The action of the game is recounted making use of many interesting a I found Basketball Belles looking at the 2012 Notable Social Studies Tradebook list on the National Council for the Social Studies website. I was intrigued by the description of this book so I decided to it. This book is the story of the first game played between two women’s college teams, Stanford and Berkley. It begins with a brief background on women’s basketball and the rules for women. It then goes on to describe the game. The action of the game is recounted making use of many interesting and new (for many children) vocabulary words such as parasol, deadlock, and bloomers. These unfamiliar words take from the era this story was set in and add to the historical accuracy of the story. The story was interesting and I especially liked the message of women breaking barriers, but I also found it a tad boring. There was no real conflict or drama in the story and because of this I found myself bored at times. The highlight of the story for me is the beautiful illustrations—the use of rich colors and realistic depictions of people from the era draw you in. You can see the hairstyles and clothing of the era, which helps me imagine what it was like. Overall, I think this book could be used in the upper elementary grades when discussing women’s rights or issues. Why was this game such a big deal? How has the world changed since this game? These questions and others would lead to an interesting discussion with students.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Halie Korff

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book is about a girl who was expected to do things one way because that is how society wants her to do them, but rather goes her own route and shows women they can as well. Basketball Belles was chosen for my text set because it is so important to keep reminding girls and everybody for that matter of fact that they are able to do things that are “for boys” as well as show them a strong woman that had to start them on this path. This book adds background, and perseverance, and shows what it This book is about a girl who was expected to do things one way because that is how society wants her to do them, but rather goes her own route and shows women they can as well. Basketball Belles was chosen for my text set because it is so important to keep reminding girls and everybody for that matter of fact that they are able to do things that are “for boys” as well as show them a strong woman that had to start them on this path. This book adds background, and perseverance, and shows what it used to be like for women, showing how much things have changed as well as a piece of what changed it. That's why I loved this book, and I thought it would do well in this text set. The illustrator set time period nicely even with the shading, so right away even though it doesn’t say the year kids will get the idea that it isn’t a modern book. The colors he used fit so nicely as well, and choosing to make it matte instead of glossy was a nice touch. It was all double page spread and the end pages are just red which gives the book a nice feel to it. I would read this to my class and have them come up with their own thing they want to do research on about how things have changed for the better and what it took to get things to change that way.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anakaren

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The illustrator created most full bleed and two page spread illustrations. It is about Agnes Morley worked and grew up in a ranch in New Mexico who then went off to college to Stanford. It was in 1896 where basketball was not for women ,but with the help of Senda Bernson who was a teacher helped make the change. Where women were assigned a section on the court, was the first game ever to be played for women's college at Stanford university .They are tied up and the crowd is up and rooting for th The illustrator created most full bleed and two page spread illustrations. It is about Agnes Morley worked and grew up in a ranch in New Mexico who then went off to college to Stanford. It was in 1896 where basketball was not for women ,but with the help of Senda Bernson who was a teacher helped make the change. Where women were assigned a section on the court, was the first game ever to be played for women's college at Stanford university .They are tied up and the crowd is up and rooting for their teams. Agnes team ends up winning and I like how the book is from her perspective and you can feel her excitement when on the court and how she feels in the moment. Agnes mom had sent her to Stanford to be more ladylike and basketball is probably not what she had imagined. Children grow up playing with what corresponds with their gender , boys play sports and the girls do cheer and dance , this is showing them that things should not be classified that way and as they please. So talking about this with young students Is important so they can learn how to be more open , they can talk about sports they enjoy playing and how it would have been if they were alive during this time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alli Kingsley

    This book was not at all what I expected. This fast-paced tale keeps you on the edge of your seat, as the plot centers around the women’s basketball game: Stanford versus Berkley. Reading, I believe the story is historical fiction, but all the facts and baseline information is true. In fact, the back of the book has backmatter with resources of study and a brief history of women’s basketball. I like this story because it showed me a new story I never knew of before. I think students will like th This book was not at all what I expected. This fast-paced tale keeps you on the edge of your seat, as the plot centers around the women’s basketball game: Stanford versus Berkley. Reading, I believe the story is historical fiction, but all the facts and baseline information is true. In fact, the back of the book has backmatter with resources of study and a brief history of women’s basketball. I like this story because it showed me a new story I never knew of before. I think students will like this story. I would save this more for a library or independent reading setting. This can draw in readers who like sports stories. The illustrations also greatly add to the story, as one can feel the tension on the court with every missed shot and free throw. All in all, this was a very enjoyable and informational read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    “I think that a lady can be tough and strong as well as refined and polite. She can even play basketball.” Details the events of the first college women’s basketball game: Stanford University vs Berkeley on April 4, 1896. It is told from the perspective of Agnes Morley, who grew up on a ranch in New Mexico and whose mother sent her to Stanford to become a lady. Such an interesting bit of history for kids, especially girls, to read about. Includes an author’s note, timeline of women’s basketball an “I think that a lady can be tough and strong as well as refined and polite. She can even play basketball.” Details the events of the first college women’s basketball game: Stanford University vs Berkeley on April 4, 1896. It is told from the perspective of Agnes Morley, who grew up on a ranch in New Mexico and whose mother sent her to Stanford to become a lady. Such an interesting bit of history for kids, especially girls, to read about. Includes an author’s note, timeline of women’s basketball and a list of resources for further reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jo Oehrlein

    A first person telling of the first college women's basketball game -- Stanford vs Berkeley. It doesn't sound exciting by today's standards because scoring was VERY low. And the audience was all women since it was considered inappropriate to have men watching women sweat. You won't recognize the uniforms either, because the women wore long sleeves and long bloomer-pants. This was an important first step, though, that led to today's incredible women's NCAA hoops and the WNBA. A first person telling of the first college women's basketball game -- Stanford vs Berkeley. It doesn't sound exciting by today's standards because scoring was VERY low. And the audience was all women since it was considered inappropriate to have men watching women sweat. You won't recognize the uniforms either, because the women wore long sleeves and long bloomer-pants. This was an important first step, though, that led to today's incredible women's NCAA hoops and the WNBA.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kylie Rademacher

    As a basketball player I might be a little biased but I loved this book! Through the narrative of Agnes Morley, a guard on Standford's first women's basketball team, much is revealed about the evolution of the sport. Not only is fascinating to see how the game has progressed but the story also reminds readers that women can be both competitive and strong as well as lady-like. The back matter provides an awesome timeline of women's basketball over the years! As a basketball player I might be a little biased but I loved this book! Through the narrative of Agnes Morley, a guard on Standford's first women's basketball team, much is revealed about the evolution of the sport. Not only is fascinating to see how the game has progressed but the story also reminds readers that women can be both competitive and strong as well as lady-like. The back matter provides an awesome timeline of women's basketball over the years!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Abby Williams

    This follows a fictional story of the small stepping stones to the development of competitive women's basketball. It broke a lot of gender barriers in place during the time it is set in. I liked at the end of the book, there was a timeline of women basketball and how long it took for it to become an official sport. I would recommend this to any child who likes sports around the k-2nd grade. This follows a fictional story of the small stepping stones to the development of competitive women's basketball. It broke a lot of gender barriers in place during the time it is set in. I liked at the end of the book, there was a timeline of women basketball and how long it took for it to become an official sport. I would recommend this to any child who likes sports around the k-2nd grade.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alex Carden

    Published: 2011 Themes: Female empowerment, defying the odds My favorite part of this story is at the very end when Agnes says that girls can be strong and tough, but also delicate and proper. I would use this book in the classroom to show the girls that they can play sports and have fun just like the boys do because if as long as it makes you happy, there's no harm in playing. Published: 2011 Themes: Female empowerment, defying the odds My favorite part of this story is at the very end when Agnes says that girls can be strong and tough, but also delicate and proper. I would use this book in the classroom to show the girls that they can play sports and have fun just like the boys do because if as long as it makes you happy, there's no harm in playing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessie

    I hadn't realized how recent basketball was as a game, and it was interesting to read about a key early event in women's basketball. The game described feels very different! I could have done without some of the early emphasis on Agnes not being a "girlie-girl" or not wanting to be ladylike. I hadn't realized how recent basketball was as a game, and it was interesting to read about a key early event in women's basketball. The game described feels very different! I could have done without some of the early emphasis on Agnes not being a "girlie-girl" or not wanting to be ladylike.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Powell

    A rolicking look at the first intercollegiate womens' basketball game. A rolicking look at the first intercollegiate womens' basketball game.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christie Angleton

    Disappointingly meh. When will people stop using the term “girly girl,” especially in a book that is supposedly “empowering” to women?

  18. 4 out of 5

    Oscar Conley 4/7

    The book was good it should have had more history behind the story.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Written in first person, this is a story of two college women's basketball game. No men were allowed, other then the janitor of course. Written in first person, this is a story of two college women's basketball game. No men were allowed, other then the janitor of course.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    I'm just so happy this book exists! The illustrations blew my mind - their "uniforms" are incomprehensible in 2020. Fun to look back in time and realize how far we've come with women athletics. I'm just so happy this book exists! The illustrations blew my mind - their "uniforms" are incomprehensible in 2020. Fun to look back in time and realize how far we've come with women athletics.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Engaging book about early women’s basketball.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Lunt

    great book about a young lady sent to college to "become a lady" and instead makes a name for herself on the basketball court great book about a young lady sent to college to "become a lady" and instead makes a name for herself on the basketball court

  23. 5 out of 5

    Darin Raguse

    Fiction Twin Text: Alexander, K. (2014). The crossover. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Rationale: My intermediate grade non-fiction selection, Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women's Hoops on the Map, tells the story of a young girl raised on New Mexico cattle ranch. She grew up to play in the first ever basketball game between two women's teams in 1896. The game, which the author describes in detail, was played only 5 years after the sport was inven Fiction Twin Text: Alexander, K. (2014). The crossover. New York, NY: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Rationale: My intermediate grade non-fiction selection, Basketball Belles: How Two Teams and One Scrappy Player Put Women's Hoops on the Map, tells the story of a young girl raised on New Mexico cattle ranch. She grew up to play in the first ever basketball game between two women's teams in 1896. The game, which the author describes in detail, was played only 5 years after the sport was invented. The book takes the reader back to a time when it was so shocking for women to participate in competitive sports that even the audience was limited to females. My twin text fiction selection, The Crossover, tells the story, in poetry and first person accounts, of twin boys that are high school basketball stars. The book explores the brothers relationships with their father, a former professional basketball player, their mother, an assistant principal, and the different interests each boy pursues while maintaining their love of the game. I would start by reading the Newberry Award winning book, The Crossover, as it is a highly engaging story that just happens to play out in the context of the popular sport of basketball. While the tales told in verse throughout the book are wrapped around exciting basketball games, students will be drawn to the relationships among and between the two brothers, their parents, and their friends. Strategy Application: Many upper elementary students are familiar with the sport of basketball as it exists in society today. This lends itself to the strategy of activating prior knowledge. Therefore, after reading the more contemporary fictional story, which connects well with knowledge students have, I would introduce the non-fiction text which includes a factual account of the first women's basketball game played in the late 1800's to my students. Taken together, the books provide an outline for how the game of basketball has changed since it was invented. More importantly, the texts provide a basis for students to compare and contrast the different eras, the challenges that young girls who were interested in sports faced, and how we sometimes expect people to act simply because of their gender or race. Text Structures and Features of Non-Fiction Book: - A narrative of the first competitive basketball game played by females. - Author's notes that provide more context to that game and the development of women's basketball. - A timeline of important event in women's basketball from it's inception to the development of a professional basketball league for women (the WNBA). - A list of additional resources including other books and places to visit to learn more about the topic.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This book about the first inter-collegiate basketball game between women will make you realize how much the game has changed in the last century. First thing that jumped out at me was the fact that the ball was stuffed. It didn't bounce. There was a hoop or what should be called a basket since was very literally a basket with a closed bottom, but when the ball doesn't bounce it hardly seems like basketball is being played. Also evidenced throughout the book was what extreme measures had to be ta This book about the first inter-collegiate basketball game between women will make you realize how much the game has changed in the last century. First thing that jumped out at me was the fact that the ball was stuffed. It didn't bounce. There was a hoop or what should be called a basket since was very literally a basket with a closed bottom, but when the ball doesn't bounce it hardly seems like basketball is being played. Also evidenced throughout the book was what extreme measures had to be taken to ascribe to etiquette and beliefs of the day about women. The idea that a man shouldn't see a woman sweat just seems insane. Considering adequate air conditioning was a long way off and they dressed like that were walking into a winter storm year round, I don't see how sweat was an avoidable sight. The outfits, and I think that outfit rather than uniform is the more accurate term here, made them look like Elizabethan poets. One team was even wearing what looked like a night cap on their heads. The point system was different. Every basket was worth one point, no matter what. There were different lines on the court than we have, lines that were specifically added for the women's game and that have long since been removed. The game literally ended 2 to 1. That's like a game of soccer or baseball by today's standards. Aside from being surprising, this was also a fun book to read simply because the details of the game were so well told. It was a good story and a fair bit of history. I enjoyed the whole thing.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah W

    Teams representing Stanford and Berkeley came together to play women's basketball before a crowd of 500 rowdy fans. The only men at this game were a janitor and his assistant. The women on each team were assigned different sections of the court to play. Successful baskets were awarded only a single point. While Fouls still gave players a chance at a basket, much was different at this first intercollegiate women's game. The game is shown through the eyes of Agnes Morley, one of the players on Stan Teams representing Stanford and Berkeley came together to play women's basketball before a crowd of 500 rowdy fans. The only men at this game were a janitor and his assistant. The women on each team were assigned different sections of the court to play. Successful baskets were awarded only a single point. While Fouls still gave players a chance at a basket, much was different at this first intercollegiate women's game. The game is shown through the eyes of Agnes Morley, one of the players on Stanford's team. A ranch girl at heart, Agnes's mother sent her to Stanford in hopes of making her a lady. Instead, she ends up on the Stanford women's basketball game. While the Stanford team is used to playing in front of everyone, the Berkeley team insists that they don't play outside where the men can see. Matt Collins's illustrations bring to life the energy and emotion of the game in rich detail. The author's note explains more about Morley's life as well as the varied accomplishment of her fellow players. A timeline at the back details how women's basketball developed and changed over time. Educators will appreciate the resources suggested at the end of the book.One use for this book would be to have students compare basketball today with how it was played in the 1890s as well as changes in equipment and uniform.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    This is a fun book, at its best when the illustrator overwhelms the very limited text. Not that the text is bad, but without the illustrations it would be fairly dry. It's about the first collegiate-level women's basketball game, held in 1896 between Stanford and U.C. Berkeley. It was considered un-ladylike to have men attend such a game as fans, so only women were allowed in the stands. The only men in the building were the janitors, who had to fix the basket during the game. The rules for women' This is a fun book, at its best when the illustrator overwhelms the very limited text. Not that the text is bad, but without the illustrations it would be fairly dry. It's about the first collegiate-level women's basketball game, held in 1896 between Stanford and U.C. Berkeley. It was considered un-ladylike to have men attend such a game as fans, so only women were allowed in the stands. The only men in the building were the janitors, who had to fix the basket during the game. The rules for women's basketball are only partially explained in this book, which is its only real weakness. At that time, they were different from the men's rules, in order to keep women from over-exerting themselves or breaking into an unladylike dew of perspiration. The book includes some really fun notes about the viewpoint character of the story, a real woman who wrote her own books later, and some of her teammates. I recommend this book for girls interested in sports and the history of women's athletics.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tamara

    I very much enjoyed this book and its truthful and engaging illustrations. It is a story about woman’s firsts. Agnes Morley played in the first women’s college game, and tells her story of her major help for the future of basketball. One team was from Stanford University and the other team was from University at Berkeley. They were the first game to be played between two women’s college teams. It’s a nonfiction book, and biography which is important to include in the text set. It is a historical I very much enjoyed this book and its truthful and engaging illustrations. It is a story about woman’s firsts. Agnes Morley played in the first women’s college game, and tells her story of her major help for the future of basketball. One team was from Stanford University and the other team was from University at Berkeley. They were the first game to be played between two women’s college teams. It’s a nonfiction book, and biography which is important to include in the text set. It is a historical event that you wouldn't find in textbooks. Some background vocabulary will need to be provided for students. This is a great book to teach the concept of equality and gender roles. Agnes wants to play basketball and has to prove to others that girls can play just has hard as boys. This book shows female athletes and portrays good role models for young children to look up. I enjoyed the books real account and representation of the desire women had to play the game, and also still act like a lady.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    This delightful picture book describes the beginnings of women's basketball through the point of view of one of its first players, Agnes Morley. Reared in New Mexico, Morley came to Stanford to study and ended up playing basketball at the university. She describes the very first intercollegiate game, a game played only in front of a female audience because Stanford's Berkeley opponents didn't think men should see women sweating in public. The description of the rough and tumble play and mishaps This delightful picture book describes the beginnings of women's basketball through the point of view of one of its first players, Agnes Morley. Reared in New Mexico, Morley came to Stanford to study and ended up playing basketball at the university. She describes the very first intercollegiate game, a game played only in front of a female audience because Stanford's Berkeley opponents didn't think men should see women sweating in public. The description of the rough and tumble play and mishaps with the goal provide an insider's view to these early days of the sport. Back matter includes an Author's Note providing more background on Morley, a women's basketball timeline, and additional resources. Almost all of the illustrations, rendered in Corel Painter, show the determination of the players and the physical nature of the game. The engaging word choice and captivating illustrations will assure that young readers will love this trip back in time with women's basketball.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Although women’s basketball was not added as an Olympic sport until 1976, it was around for a long time before. Macy tells the story of the championship game in 1896 between Stanford and the University of California, two of the earliest college programs. The narrative unfolds through the eyes of Agnes Morely, a confident player from the Stanford team who grew up on a working ranch in New Mexico. Collins’ digital artwork captures both the rough and tumble action, with women diving and scrambling Although women’s basketball was not added as an Olympic sport until 1976, it was around for a long time before. Macy tells the story of the championship game in 1896 between Stanford and the University of California, two of the earliest college programs. The narrative unfolds through the eyes of Agnes Morely, a confident player from the Stanford team who grew up on a working ranch in New Mexico. Collins’ digital artwork captures both the rough and tumble action, with women diving and scrambling for the ball, as well as the concentrated stillness of a player attempting a free throw shot. Readers may laugh at the strange uniforms (imagine wearing full stockings to play a game of basketball!), and the unusual rules designed to make the sport more “feminine” for women players, but they’ll no doubt admire the tenacity of these early players. Read my full review in the Spring issue of the New Mexico Journal of Reading.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Have you ever wondered when girls started playing basketball? Have the rules changed? In the sixty's when I started playing basketball in junior high gym class, girls could only play half court and dribble three times...when did the rules change? This book will answer all these questions. Agnes Morley played in the first women's college's women's game. Basketball Belles is a picture book that highlights Agnes's contributions to basketball. It also has a time line and additional author notes for Have you ever wondered when girls started playing basketball? Have the rules changed? In the sixty's when I started playing basketball in junior high gym class, girls could only play half court and dribble three times...when did the rules change? This book will answer all these questions. Agnes Morley played in the first women's college's women's game. Basketball Belles is a picture book that highlights Agnes's contributions to basketball. It also has a time line and additional author notes for more facts about the early game. The color pictures show the action and resolve of the first players. Find this book in the biography section of our library. Reviews & Awards Booklist starred 03/15/11 Publishers Weekly 02/14/11 Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books 04/01/11 School Library Journal 04/01/11

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