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King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table (Puffin Classics)

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Retold out of the old romances, this collection of Arthurian tales endeavors to make each adventure--"The Quest for the Round Table, " "The First Quest of Sir Lancelot, " "How the Holy Grail Came to Camelot, " and so forth--part of a fixed pattern that effectively presents the whole story, as it does in Le Morte D'Arthur, but in a way less intimidating to young readers. (A Retold out of the old romances, this collection of Arthurian tales endeavors to make each adventure--"The Quest for the Round Table, " "The First Quest of Sir Lancelot, " "How the Holy Grail Came to Camelot, " and so forth--part of a fixed pattern that effectively presents the whole story, as it does in Le Morte D'Arthur, but in a way less intimidating to young readers. (All Ages)


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Retold out of the old romances, this collection of Arthurian tales endeavors to make each adventure--"The Quest for the Round Table, " "The First Quest of Sir Lancelot, " "How the Holy Grail Came to Camelot, " and so forth--part of a fixed pattern that effectively presents the whole story, as it does in Le Morte D'Arthur, but in a way less intimidating to young readers. (A Retold out of the old romances, this collection of Arthurian tales endeavors to make each adventure--"The Quest for the Round Table, " "The First Quest of Sir Lancelot, " "How the Holy Grail Came to Camelot, " and so forth--part of a fixed pattern that effectively presents the whole story, as it does in Le Morte D'Arthur, but in a way less intimidating to young readers. (All Ages)

30 review for King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table (Puffin Classics)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Leonard Gaya

    Roger Lancelyn Green may not be quite as famous as his teachers and fellow Oxfordians, C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. He is, nonetheless, one of the major popularisers of ancient myths and legends in English culture — Neil Gaiman recently acknowledged (in his introduction to Norse Mythology) that Lancelyn Green’s books profoundly influenced his early vocation as a writer. King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table was published a few years after World War II, around the same time as Tolkien’s Roger Lancelyn Green may not be quite as famous as his teachers and fellow Oxfordians, C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. He is, nonetheless, one of the major popularisers of ancient myths and legends in English culture — Neil Gaiman recently acknowledged (in his introduction to Norse Mythology) that Lancelyn Green’s books profoundly influenced his early vocation as a writer. King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table was published a few years after World War II, around the same time as Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Lewis’ The Chronicles of Narnia and T. H. White’s The Once and Future King… Let’s say that the romances of chivalry were all the rage in the 1950s — just as dragons and magic fantasies have been all the rage since the 1990s, with George R.R. Martin and J.K. Rowling at the forefront. Lancelyn Green’s book, however, is not a complete redesign of the old tales: instead, it is a straightforward and condensed retelling of the Arthurian legends, intended for young readers who are, for the most part, unfamiliar with this vast body of literature. It covers the whole cycle: the story of Uther Pendragon, Merlin and Nimue, the youth of Arthur and the sword in the stone, the establishment of the Round Table at Camelot, the story of Tristan and Isolde, the Fisher King, the quest of the Grail and the adventures of Gawain, Percival, Bors, Galahad, Lancelot and Guinevere, and finally the plots of Morgan Le Fay and Mordred, the battle of Camlann and the end of the fellowship. Lancelyn Green, mindful of his readership, toned down and ironed out the most explicit aspects (the sex and the gore) of these legends and the story is written in simple, slightly archaic, yet elegant prose. The whole narrative feels seamless and thoroughly consistent. Better yet, some episodes are rendered in a genuinely moving way: for instance, the tragedy of Tristan, the ordeals of the Grail nights and, most of all, the death of Arthur and his departure to Avalon (Frodo’s setting out to Valinor at the end of Tolkien’s masterpiece is an imitation of this ending); which is no small feat, since the Arthurian legends have multiple and, sometimes, conflicting sources from French, German and English medieval literature: Chrétien de Troyes, Béroul, Robert de Boron, Gottfried von Straßburg, Geoffrey of Monmouth, The Mabinogion, Wolfram von Eschenbach, and most of all, the massive 13th-century Lancelot-Grail Vulgate cycle. The Matter of Britain is primarily made up of new versions of older stories, which in turn are retellings of even older legends, dating as far back as the songs of the troubadours. Lancelyn Green — along with T. H. White — is a worthy successor of Thomas Malory. He compiled these novels of the Round Table together in his all-encompassing rendition, Le Morte d'Arthur. For those curious about modern interpretations of these stories, I would recommend listening to Richard Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde and Parsifal. I’d also suggest John Boorman’s film Excalibur, which proceeds by condensations and displacements of characters and plotlines but is still a masterpiece. I do not know if the TV shows Camelot or Merlin are any good — anyone? Aubrey Beardsley’s illustrations in this edition of King Arthur are lovely Indian ink pictures, in a style that reminds me of Gustav Klimt.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    I've had this book for awhile and am not shamed to admit that watching Merlin had pushed me into finally reading it. Before I read it I'd already had some background knowledge on the tales of King Arthur, in which I knew of a lot of the knights and some of the tales. I also knew that it would be nothing like the television show, so I wouldn't let that deter you, if that's what you're hoping for. The tales may be old and written in an old way, but they're still fun to read nonetheless. Roger Lancel I've had this book for awhile and am not shamed to admit that watching Merlin had pushed me into finally reading it. Before I read it I'd already had some background knowledge on the tales of King Arthur, in which I knew of a lot of the knights and some of the tales. I also knew that it would be nothing like the television show, so I wouldn't let that deter you, if that's what you're hoping for. The tales may be old and written in an old way, but they're still fun to read nonetheless. Roger Lancelyn Green's version of King Arthur was based off of Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, as well as other sources of Arthurian legend, in the hopes that he could string the tales together in a way that more represented a story with a beginning, middle and end. In King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table we see Arthur's development from small boy having just pulled the sword from the stone to beloved man and king of Camelot. We also get to read about Arthur's knights, many of whom anybody with a touch of Arthurian legend would recognize; Lancelot, Gawain, Galahad, etc. Their quests are the main source of action and adventure in this book, and they don't leave room for disappointment. Even before I started watching Merlin, I was always a fan of Arthurian legend. Really, I enjoy reading about any kind of legend, mythology or fairy tale. So, I wasn't surprised as to how easy it was to get into the stories and actually enjoy what I was reading. While I know that this book draws from other sources than just Malory, I will most probably still read Le Morte d'Arthur just to compare. The original stories were written down quite a long time ago, and this book reads with a lot of the old language that we're not so used to today. So, while it might read a bit slow and boring, it still does detail fantastic (while a bit repetitive) quests and characters. There was romance and a lot of killing, which I suppose are only to be expected in a time of knights. The characters, I believe, were really fleshed out in this book, and I give props to Green for being able to do so. The only thing that I was weary of was the fact that they all seemed to be very rash and quick to fight or kill. I'd hate to be one of the people who said one sore thing in their presence. Overall, I was completely enthralled with this book and really enjoyed reading the Arthurian legends all woven together as one story. I particularly enjoyed the Quest for the Holy Grail. The writing was a bit stiff and not easy flowing, but that didn't deter me too badly from the story. The characters were superb and made me want to see them all sitting at the round table. If anything, this book has caused me to look more in-depth into the life of Arthur and his knights, and especially eager to read Malory's version and of course finish Merlin. ☆☆☆☆/5 Recommend?: If you dig legends of any kind. Especially that of the Arthurian kind. If knighthood and quests sound appeasing to you.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    As retellings of Arthurian myth go, this one is pretty straightforward. If you've read Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, then you'll recognize King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table as a reduced and simplified form of that classic, rather than a broader compilation of tales from the vast catalogue of Arthurian myths, legends, poems, and tales. Sadly, King Arthur himself is a background character for most of the text, while his various knights wander the wilds of Britain and have all As retellings of Arthurian myth go, this one is pretty straightforward. If you've read Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, then you'll recognize King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table as a reduced and simplified form of that classic, rather than a broader compilation of tales from the vast catalogue of Arthurian myths, legends, poems, and tales. Sadly, King Arthur himself is a background character for most of the text, while his various knights wander the wilds of Britain and have all sorts of fantastical adventures. As a result, I enjoyed this book much less than I had hoped.

  4. 5 out of 5

    J.Aleksandr Wootton

    Good, but not great. I very much appreciated Green's organization of the stories; it highlights, for example, the very different tone of the Grail cycle compared with the episodic chivalry-quests and pseudo-histories that go into the rest. What it lacked, for me, was locus: Green follows Geoffrey of Monmouth and positions Arthur's kingdom shortly after the Roman withdrawal and the conflicts and alliances which immediately followed. But then Logres seems to fall out of time, its borders uncertain Good, but not great. I very much appreciated Green's organization of the stories; it highlights, for example, the very different tone of the Grail cycle compared with the episodic chivalry-quests and pseudo-histories that go into the rest. What it lacked, for me, was locus: Green follows Geoffrey of Monmouth and positions Arthur's kingdom shortly after the Roman withdrawal and the conflicts and alliances which immediately followed. But then Logres seems to fall out of time, its borders uncertain, its neighbors unfixed. Ancient legend, fairy tale, and monastic (almost pre-Gothic) imagination wax and wane from chapter to chapter, corresponding to Green's source material for a given story; perspectives on Arthur from many different time periods and cultures bleed through, and are not much harmonized. The surface is smoothed, but underneath, the composition feels a bit hodge-podge. By contrast, Green's prologue and epilogue are quite good. I hope he delivered lectures on his whole Arthurian research, because I'd love to read them.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Calzean

    Plenty of people being smote and slewed. Heads being chopped off seemed to be a popular choice for the demise. Damsels were in distress and damsels sometimes plotted evil. There were good knights and bad knights. And a bit of magic thrown in. The tales in this book still make fun reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Collin

    So it's not the most academic work you could choose to read on Arthurian legend. It's still a lot of fun. Also, if you're like me and have trouble tracking action/motivation/very frequently similar plots of all those "knight meets a damsel and fights a knight to save another damsel and gets wounded and is saved by another knight who was brought by another knight accompanied by a damsel"... if you're like me, aka not very quick, it's a very helpful overview. I want to believe that Green did his r So it's not the most academic work you could choose to read on Arthurian legend. It's still a lot of fun. Also, if you're like me and have trouble tracking action/motivation/very frequently similar plots of all those "knight meets a damsel and fights a knight to save another damsel and gets wounded and is saved by another knight who was brought by another knight accompanied by a damsel"... if you're like me, aka not very quick, it's a very helpful overview. I want to believe that Green did his research - he makes a few bibliographical notes in the intro - and that, for the most part, everything is fairly accurate. (Galahad's story is a bit truncated, though, according to what Wikipedia says about the Vulgate Cycle/etc. I'm not sure if I care, though, because the way Green told it, it was really sad. And what's Arthurian legend if not a thousand people retelling the same story in different ways?) Anyway, I liked it. I think I'm ready to move on to Pyle's version. I read the first half of Malory but that was a slog; I probably need a better translation that doesn't try to do the stilted Ye Olde English crap. I wish it was more likely that I could find an edition of the Vulgate Cycle somewhere. And I can't forget about Chrétien de Troyes. Suffice it to say I have a lot to read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fonch

    We are in front of excellent compilation of the adventures of the Knight Round Table. Roger Lancelyn Green tests that he is worth to be a member of the Inklings he is somebody that we must rediscover him. To know the arthurian cycle is necessary to read it. ................................................................................................................................................................................ Nosotros nos encontramos ante una excelente compilación de las aven We are in front of excellent compilation of the adventures of the Knight Round Table. Roger Lancelyn Green tests that he is worth to be a member of the Inklings he is somebody that we must rediscover him. To know the arthurian cycle is necessary to read it. ................................................................................................................................................................................ Nosotros nos encontramos ante una excelente compilación de las aventuras de los Caballeros de la Tabla Redonda. Roger Lancelyn Green demuestra, que es digno de ser digno de los Inklings, y a alguien, que merece ser redescubierto. Para conocer, y comprender el mito Artúrico la lectura de este libro es básica.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ana

    Given the number of scattered King Arthur tales, I'm grateful Roger Lancelyn Green reworked the tales into a cohesive story. Children will definitely enjoy this book, but it also gave me the courage to start Le Morte d'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table. Wish me luck! Given the number of scattered King Arthur tales, I'm grateful Roger Lancelyn Green reworked the tales into a cohesive story. Children will definitely enjoy this book, but it also gave me the courage to start Le Morte d'Arthur: King Arthur and the Legends of the Round Table. Wish me luck!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay B

    Really good story. Just slow and hard to understand in parts.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nobi Nobes

    It was amazing! great!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Caroline Lancaster

    I LOVED this book so much!!! I would give it a 6 star if I could, this was a school read and I’m so glad I got to read it because it was such a fun read and I highly recommend it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joe Korth

    A quick fun read that reminds you why this tale has lasted so long in our culture.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Trevor

    Personal Response I liked the book King Arthur because it had a lot of historical stories of a king who reshaped England. I didn't like the fact that there were no real transitions between chapters. Many of the stories were short with a tragic or anti-climactic ending. Plot The plot of the book was a series of stories of King Arthur and his Knights that served under him at the round table. Many of the stories were about each of the knights doing some act of valor or great virtue. Even so, there was Personal Response I liked the book King Arthur because it had a lot of historical stories of a king who reshaped England. I didn't like the fact that there were no real transitions between chapters. Many of the stories were short with a tragic or anti-climactic ending. Plot The plot of the book was a series of stories of King Arthur and his Knights that served under him at the round table. Many of the stories were about each of the knights doing some act of valor or great virtue. Even so, there was little about King Arthur himself. The main plot behind everything was to stop Morgana from stealing Excalibur and taking the grail. One of the stories was about Gawain who accepts a challenge from an immortal green knight who came to test the courage of the knights of the round table. The test was having one of the knights chop off his head and he would return the blow in three months. Characterization The characters are very vividly described with Lancelot being very arrogant towards everyone but Arthur and a few of the other knights. King Arthur was a very inspiring person, ready to sacrifice everything to save a small village and battle a knight who was enslaving people. Gawain was a very selfless person, even marrying an ugly woman without a single demand to save his uncle. Sir Percival was the son of Gawain, a knight who has been alone for his whole life, except for his mother who was very black and white about rules and has a very righteous and faithful personality. Morgana Le Fay was one of the main antagonist who disguises her devious plots behind a veil of kindness and charity. She was also a greedy individual who wanted to take Camelot for herself. Impact of Setting The setting is during medieval time. There was a lot of bloodshed during this time period. There were also many people who were looking for knights to do labors or work for them and many knights looking to make a name for themselves. During medieval time it was very common for knights to randomly challenge other knights. Recommendation I would recommend this to both genders, age 13 and up, because of complicated vocabulary and graphic scenes who enjoy old stories or just stories of old legends. I would not recommend this to people who don't really have an interest in Old England or old stories. I would rate this book four stars for trying to continue a legend that has been told for decades.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Litberg

    "After wicked King Vortigern had first invited the Saxons to settle in Britain and help him to fight the Picts and Scots, the land was never long at peace." This version of the King Arthur legend is broken down into stories, following each of the Knights on their various journeys. It is easy to read, especially compared to L'Morte d'Arthur or even The Once and Future King. Based mostly on Mallory's work, this version also takes into account other sources and I always find the retellings fascinati "After wicked King Vortigern had first invited the Saxons to settle in Britain and help him to fight the Picts and Scots, the land was never long at peace." This version of the King Arthur legend is broken down into stories, following each of the Knights on their various journeys. It is easy to read, especially compared to L'Morte d'Arthur or even The Once and Future King. Based mostly on Mallory's work, this version also takes into account other sources and I always find the retellings fascinating.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Walsh

    I have always liked the tales of King Arthur, though this is the first time in book-form. I absolutely loved it! Who wouldn't want an epic story about noble knights, kings, lords and ladies, wizards, dragons, and fearsome duels? The quests and adventures in this book were really interesting and fun, and along the way you learn good principles of justice, forgiveness, sacrifice along with the knights. I loved this book almost as much as I love Roger Lancelyn Green's other legend telling, The Adven I have always liked the tales of King Arthur, though this is the first time in book-form. I absolutely loved it! Who wouldn't want an epic story about noble knights, kings, lords and ladies, wizards, dragons, and fearsome duels? The quests and adventures in this book were really interesting and fun, and along the way you learn good principles of justice, forgiveness, sacrifice along with the knights. I loved this book almost as much as I love Roger Lancelyn Green's other legend telling, The Adventures of Robin Hood.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joshua

    This is a great collection of the Arthurian legends rewritten so younger readers can wet their teeth on these stories. I read this book in the eighth grade and I still have it on my shelf and because of this book I got into Monty Python and the Holy Grail, The Lord of the Rings, and T.H. White's The Once and Future King. Books like this are a valuable resource because they serve as starting points and foundations for the myths that make up so much of our culture. This is a great collection of the Arthurian legends rewritten so younger readers can wet their teeth on these stories. I read this book in the eighth grade and I still have it on my shelf and because of this book I got into Monty Python and the Holy Grail, The Lord of the Rings, and T.H. White's The Once and Future King. Books like this are a valuable resource because they serve as starting points and foundations for the myths that make up so much of our culture.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nada Sobhi

    This is by all means a HORRID book! It is an insult to the Tales of Camelot, King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. The writing of the book is terrible; it makes you want to skip parts. It is very hard to enjoy this book. I am currently hiding this book in the farthest, darkest shelf in the house.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    A good spin on taking older arthur tales together I had never read before. Not bad. =)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniëlle Van den Brink

    "All the bravest and noblest knights rejoiced exceedingly that they had such a king, one who would risk his life in an adventure as other ordinary knights did." A slightly more simplified retelling of the classic King Arthur stories. All the well known heroes of Arthurian tales make an appearance and go through their trials to prove themselves worhty of the highest honour a knight can be given, a seat at the round table. I enjoyed reading this, though I can't quite pinpoint who the target group i "All the bravest and noblest knights rejoiced exceedingly that they had such a king, one who would risk his life in an adventure as other ordinary knights did." A slightly more simplified retelling of the classic King Arthur stories. All the well known heroes of Arthurian tales make an appearance and go through their trials to prove themselves worhty of the highest honour a knight can be given, a seat at the round table. I enjoyed reading this, though I can't quite pinpoint who the target group is. The language and vocabulary seems a bit too complicated for younger children and rushes through stories a bit too quickly to hold the attention of older readers. Perhaps the language and vocab is more down to it being a bit old, it does seem to be aimed at a younger audience. I am unsure to what extent I can accredit success to Green, since this is a retelling and I wasn't too fond of his writing at times. Some sense felt very rushed and knights would appear in the first paragraph and their death would briefly be described in the second. I do quite enjoy the classic structure of trusting fate and make wise decisions. In the very beginning, Merlin is trying to reign in the young war-hungry Arthur and asks him which he likes best, the scabbard or the sword? Arthur, of course, replies he likes the sword best and Merlin scolds him for it, because the scabbard holds an enchantment that will protect him from dying of bloodloss. Arthur could never have known that the scabbard could do that but that's not really the point. I suppose the lesson was to not take things at face value. I like those little details in stories. All in all, very enjoyable but it felt a tad rushed to me. I would still recommend it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    Perhaps my favorite of Roger Lancelyn Green’s retellings of myths and legends for children, though it’s tough to choose. The ending, drawn from a variety of Arthurian stories but mostly—and in some places almost word for word—from Malory, moved me almost to tears, even though I knew it was coming. Well done.

  21. 5 out of 5

    k

    Played with my emotions. In a good way.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    Read out loud to my children and we really enjoyed it. It did take a while to make it through, but some of the chapters were really exciting! I'm glad we went for it! Read out loud to my children and we really enjoyed it. It did take a while to make it through, but some of the chapters were really exciting! I'm glad we went for it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Loar

    A very fun read!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Reid

    My mind was filled with colorful imagery, my mind was the battlefield and the author filled it with the characters of war and fantasy.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Art

    First thing: There are "things to think about" chapters in the back you should read upfront. They're like discussion points for a book club and they address whether or not King Arthur was real, other versions of the Arthurian Legends (e.g. Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, 1485), and explain the weapons knights used. This is all super insightful and makes reading the entire book more meaningful. Normal review: I wanted to learn about King Arthur and this book delivered. Like the title suggest First thing: There are "things to think about" chapters in the back you should read upfront. They're like discussion points for a book club and they address whether or not King Arthur was real, other versions of the Arthurian Legends (e.g. Sir Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur, 1485), and explain the weapons knights used. This is all super insightful and makes reading the entire book more meaningful. Normal review: I wanted to learn about King Arthur and this book delivered. Like the title suggests, it's not just about King Arthur, but also the adventures of the knights in his court: e.g. Sir Lancelot, Sir Galahad, etc. That's good, I didn't want to read about Lancelot separately. It also covers Excalibur, the Holy Grail, and a bit about Merlin. It's intended for Ages 10+ but with its medieval-esque language it doesn't read like a 6th grade book, though it's still a quick read. I didn't want to read Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur written in 1485; Green's is a simplified retelling of Malory's & others' writings. The bulk of the book is repetitive like: "Chapter X: Here's a knight of the Round Table; he rode out on a quest; along the way he fought bad knights & saved a damsel who became his wife; his quest complete he now returned to King Arthur..." But each of these stories does provide more context and advances the overall mission of King Arthur's court.

  26. 5 out of 5

    rORYHINSOn

    Roger Lancelyn Green's novel, King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, is a very long and pretty good book. Even if you read it in 1 or 2 days you probably would still only remember a few important things that happened. This book goes over a time span of about a century(maybe a little more) and is filled with lots of magical quests and cool adventures. It's has Knights, sorcerers, kings, queens, peasants, damsels in distress, and pretty much everything. If I were to write or even summariz Roger Lancelyn Green's novel, King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table, is a very long and pretty good book. Even if you read it in 1 or 2 days you probably would still only remember a few important things that happened. This book goes over a time span of about a century(maybe a little more) and is filled with lots of magical quests and cool adventures. It's has Knights, sorcerers, kings, queens, peasants, damsels in distress, and pretty much everything. If I were to write or even summarize all the important stuff, it would take weeks.(not even exaggerating) over all it was a good book and I give it 4.5-5 stars. By Rory Hinson

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alisha Marie

    "Games of men exhaust me"...and so exclaims Morgan Pendragon (also known as Morgaine, Morgana, etc.) in the Starz retelling of King Arthur's tale, Camelot. And with those words I simply sum up my entire attitude while reading King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table. I haven't read many books about Arthurian legend (in fact, this is only my second), but I've seen it retold quite a few times in both movies and TV shows. I imagined that when I picked up a book that told the tales of King Arth "Games of men exhaust me"...and so exclaims Morgan Pendragon (also known as Morgaine, Morgana, etc.) in the Starz retelling of King Arthur's tale, Camelot. And with those words I simply sum up my entire attitude while reading King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table. I haven't read many books about Arthurian legend (in fact, this is only my second), but I've seen it retold quite a few times in both movies and TV shows. I imagined that when I picked up a book that told the tales of King Arthur, that book would be filled to the brim with action, intrigue, and romance (even if the whole tale with Arthur and Guinevere makes me roll my eyes every single time) the way it seems to be in those same TV shows and movies. So, imagine my surprise that I found myself bored beyond belief while reading King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table. Could pop culture have been that wrong? How can a legend whose gist of it seems to imply that magic, battles, romance happened in every corner be so boring? I mean, it can't be, right? Oh...but it was. Not much of anything happened in King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table. King Arthur picks a knight...that knight meets a fair maiden...that knight tries to prove himself in a disappointingly less than epic battle. At times he's victorious, at times he's not (meanwhile I'm bored at ALL times). Then you have another knight...and the same thing happens all over again. I can't differentiate between these knights because you know so little about them. I guess this book includes a little bit of most of the Arthurian legends which means that you get a small dose of all the characters. But you really need a big dose to get a feel for the characters. Those small doses just made me not give a damn about any of the characters because I didn't really know anything about them. Even Morgan (Morgana, Morgaine, whatever!) was wasted here and that's the one character that everyone damn well knows remains intriguing in EVERY retelling. Yet in the moments she popped up, she wasn't doing much of anything (just little teeny bits of evil). I found that to be the biggest travesty of all. So, overall, I found King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table to be excruciatingly boring. No swashbuckling knights are to be found here. No intriguing women are found here either (probably because they don't do much of anything. Something that I'm glad to see changes in a lot of the retellings). I'm highly disappointed and feel a little bit sullied towards other Arthurian books. I'm looking at my new used copy of the Mists of Avalon and wondering whether or not I should pick it...

  28. 5 out of 5

    Valentino Orihuela

    I always like reading classic tales like Alice in Wonderland, and Peter Pan. Now King Arthur and his Noble Knights is no exception. I always had a fascination with the Medieval times ever since I learned it from history class. I always was fascinated with the whole theme and feeling of it. Now King Arthur and his Noble Knights has that feeling of olden times and even has the aged English written into it. Now that may scare some readers since they may worry over not understanding what they are s I always like reading classic tales like Alice in Wonderland, and Peter Pan. Now King Arthur and his Noble Knights is no exception. I always had a fascination with the Medieval times ever since I learned it from history class. I always was fascinated with the whole theme and feeling of it. Now King Arthur and his Noble Knights has that feeling of olden times and even has the aged English written into it. Now that may scare some readers since they may worry over not understanding what they are saying, and it may be a little hard to understand. Just make sure you are confident with your English and read over it a two to three more times if you get lost. Not to spoil anything but the story talks about all the our heroes of the Round Table. This first starts with Arthur and his foster family going to a tournament of Kingdoms, to decide on who can try pulling the Sword out of the stone pedestal, otherwise known as The Sword in Stone. This was set here by Merlin a famous sorcerer of long ago. The sword was named Excalibur, and he said whoever pulled it was of Noble Blood, and was granted to be King Of England. During one of his Brother’s, his brother being Sir Kay, matches he pulls the sword out since his weapon broke during a match. His brother tries to take credit but is soon proven wrong as he can’t perform the feat of sticking the sword back into the stone like Arthur who performs it with ease. He is crowned King and this then sets off, into other Knightly tales of the other Knights joining the round table, the search for the Holy Grail, and The Wars for the Holy Grail. Definitely a thrilling tale filled with action that may be a hard to understand at first but worth a read for this classic.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sofia

    I’m personally not about the whole medieval thing. This book was very boring, the parts that should’ve been exciting were written in a way that could put me to sleep. Pretty disappointed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I have always loved hearing the stories of King Arthur and his knights. However, this is the first book that I have actually gotten through. I tried reading "The Once and Future King" but I was in a tough semester at school so I never finished it. This book wasn't as hard of a read as what I remember from other books that I have sampled. The chapters are broken up into much smaller stories or adventures. The book seemed to me more like a collection of short stories that were all related. I was r I have always loved hearing the stories of King Arthur and his knights. However, this is the first book that I have actually gotten through. I tried reading "The Once and Future King" but I was in a tough semester at school so I never finished it. This book wasn't as hard of a read as what I remember from other books that I have sampled. The chapters are broken up into much smaller stories or adventures. The book seemed to me more like a collection of short stories that were all related. I was reading other books at the same time so it was easy to read a chapter in this book then move on to another book and then come back to this book. The book did get a little bit monotonous because all the knights wanted to do was greet each other, then pontificate for a while on their superior strength, and then to knock each other off from their horses. But it was a very rich and enjoyable group of stories. I would recommend this to anyone who likes fantasy or likes hearing stories about knights or adventures. This would be a great read for a teenager as well.

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